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Does anyone forsee any problems?

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        09-19-2013, 09:34 AM
      #11
    Weanling
    Yes, I am very nicely trying to discourage her. I am 61 years old, and I like giving advise and helping people with their problems, but I am finding out more and more, that people just don't listen, even when they ask for your advise, they still don't listen, even tho it's perfectly good advise. Then, after whatever bad thing happens, that I warned them was going to happen, guess who has to listen to them whine and cry about how they should have listened.
    Case in point: I once had a very good friend, she was a person who had never done drugs of any kind, then got involved with a guy who was a crack addict who had just been paroled from prison! I tried to warn her, over and over, and all she could say is if he loved her enough, he would change. Well, he ended up stealing her blind, caused her to lose all her family,but she would always take him back. This was 8 years ago, and for all I know, she's still with him.
         
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        09-19-2013, 09:50 AM
      #12
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by cowgirllinda1952    
    Yes, I am very nicely trying to discourage her. I am 61 years old, and I like giving advise and helping people with their problems, but I am finding out more and more, that people just don't listen, even when they ask for your advise, they still don't listen, even tho it's perfectly good advise.
    mostly because they are just looking for someone to agree with them or support their decision (which is already made)

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by cowgirllinda1952    
    Then, after whatever bad thing happens, that I warned them was going to happen, guess who has to listen to them whine and cry about how they should have listened.

    Case in point: I once had a very good friend, she was a person who had never done drugs of any kind, then got involved with a guy who was a crack addict who had just been paroled from prison! I tried to warn her, over and over, and all she could say is if he loved her enough, he would change. Well, he ended up stealing her blind, caused her to lose all her family,but she would always take him back. This was 8 years ago, and for all I know, she's still with him.
    sorry about your buddy

    Usually a quick "i told you so" stops the crying and whining
    loosie likes this.
         
        09-19-2013, 10:16 AM
      #13
    Foal
    I also agree that is does not sound like the best match. I have found that starting older horses under saddle can be a bit tricky. They are definitely more mature in a lot of ways, which can make certain things easier, but a lot of the time they will have already formed their own opinion about how their world works, and while some horses welcome the work and change of lifestyle, it can be hard to convince some of the others to change their minds!

    Older horse or not, it still sounds like your friend would be better off investing money in plenty of lessons and eventually a lease situation on a solid, well broke horse that she can just hop on and ride and have fun with. Then later down the road she can think about buying something. Whether she take the advice or not, well, you or anyone else don't really have any control over that. If she gets the horse anyways and continues to disregard any good advice on the situation, there comes a time where you'll just have to tell her that you are sorry, but you can't support her decision because of the reasons you've outlined before, and just quietly remove yourself from the situation. You tried to help her and she chose not to take good advice, so if she wants to go get herself half killed with an unbroke horse, that's really her prerogative.
         
        09-19-2013, 10:56 AM
      #14
    Weanling
    It all depends on the mare. I personally would rather have a horse that had never been fooled with, and hadnt learned any bad habbits that one that had been broke 2-3times and had been treated like some kids puppy dog for the last 9yrs.

    Jim
    loosie and Roux like this.
         
        09-19-2013, 11:39 AM
      #15
    Showing
    $400 is probably just a little over slaughter price, so no one would buy her for that.
         
        09-19-2013, 11:45 AM
      #16
    Started
    Really a bad idea.
    A gentle unbroken horse can easily be screwed up and frustrated by a new owner with no experience. They can also screw up a well trained horse if they have no clue what to do and won't get instruction or take advice from others with experience. There is more to riding than getting on and kicking them in the slats to go.
    Hopefully your friend will heed your advice to start with a mellow, well trained mount. It will make the journey from complete novice to "horsewoman" a lot less bumpy...for her and the horse.
    Good luck to you.
         
        09-19-2013, 03:06 PM
      #17
    Weanling
    Yes, I was sure it was too much money,I don't even know if the mare has ground manners or not. I just can't even imagine anyone wasting a nice horse for 9 years and not giving them a job. I am hoping she'll ask me to go with her to look, then I'm sure I can find some reason to discourage her,LOL! All she sees is a fat, pretty paint. She's never even ridden a horse, plus, I already know, she is not going to want to listen to anything a trainer has to say, she'll want everything her own way.
         
        09-19-2013, 03:42 PM
      #18
    Weanling
    No, just NO!!

    If this is truthfully I nice mare she should be broke by now! Training an older horse can be very hard to impossible. You can try but there a very likely chance that you will end up with an unbroken crazy pasture pet. She better be under $200 otherwise absolutely your crazy! Also if you are not a pretty experienced horse person you need not to do this for your own safety!
         
        09-19-2013, 04:09 PM
      #19
    Weanling
    This sounds like a terrible idea, I think :( I don't really have any advice on how to convince her of that, but honestly I would say a horse like this would be a slight risk for someone with much horse experience. Did you really mean none whatsoever? Buying a horse without experience isn't a great idea period, let alone buying a horse to train from scratch. If she insists she needs to buy a horse, I would buy one already way, way broke. But really, it seems very silly to do anything but start with lessons and then a lease.
         
        09-19-2013, 07:48 PM
      #20
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by cowgirllinda1952    
    I am 61 years old, and I like giving advise and helping people with their problems, but I am finding out more and more, that people just don't listen, even when they ask for your advise,...
    You made it to 61yo & only just learning that?? You must have only recently started offering people advice then! You can lead a man to knowledge but you can't make him think!

    Quote:
    Training an older horse can be very hard to impossible. You can try but there a very likely chance that you will end up with an unbroken crazy pasture pet.
    That's a load of kerfooey! But as we're discussing a beginner, IMO an untrained horse of any age is a bad move.
         

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