Filly Pinning It's Ears - Page 3 - The Horse Forum

 10Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #21 of 31 Old 06-24-2013, 11:40 PM Thread Starter
Foal
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Idaho <3
Posts: 73
• Horses: 0
Quote:
Originally Posted by Saddlebag View Post
Pink, there's a fine line between the filly following you and the filly thinking she's driving you away. Since her ears were pinned I'm going to say she thinks she's driving you away which makes her herd position superior to yours. The next time she does this suddenly turn to face her and stamp one foot as you take a step toward her and hold your hand to block her. This should surprise her and cause her to stop. Remain like this until her ears come up.
Thank you! It is great advise... And I will do this. I don't want it to turn into aggressive behavior.
Posted via Mobile Device

Last edited by pinkbow; 06-24-2013 at 11:43 PM.
pinkbow is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #22 of 31 Old 06-25-2013, 12:04 AM
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Seattle, WA
Posts: 38,489
• Horses: 2
another technicque I have used when I go out into the pasture to get a horse, and the other horses walk behind me and get too close, uninvited, I take the lead rope and the halter ( a rope halter with NO HARDWARE), bundle it up and put it where a tail would be if I had one. Then I stop , start to swish my tail back and forth like an irritated horse would, and back toward the horse who is pushing too close into me. They either get the message quick and move away, or they get a bit of a smack in the nose with the line as it swishes back and forth. This mimicry of horse body language gets the message across "don't get so close to me!" very clearly.

AS for using with a baby, just be careful to not whack him . I mean, give her a chance to back away.
And balance that with sometimes turning toward her and inviting her toward you. YOu should be able to both move her away from you when you want, and draw her toward you when you want, but horses must learn to never assume they are invited in. They must stand , look at you and "ask" with that facial expression that expresses interest. IF you want them closer, you can invite them in, but if a horse steps toward me with an aggressive attitude, even if it's only a sort of "possessive" way of being, I ask the horse to stop 6 feet away and the I make the final approach, while he awaits ME.
tinyliny is offline  
post #23 of 31 Old 06-25-2013, 12:22 AM
Green Broke
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Canada
Posts: 3,377
• Horses: 0
QUOTE=tinyliny;2885570]another technicque I have used when I go out into the pasture to get a horse, and the other horses walk behind me and get too close, uninvited, I take the lead rope and the halter ....[/QUOTE]

My variation on this is a stick - technically an old branch which I guess would be 2-3' long. I hold it in such away that it sticks out behind me and the horse walking into my space then pokes him/herself on the stick. I don't move the stick at all so as soon as they back off they've made their own release from pressure and get the message with minimum trauma.
Chevaux is offline  
post #24 of 31 Old 06-25-2013, 12:27 AM
Foal
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Posts: 25
• Horses: 2
Quote:
Originally Posted by JaphyJaphy View Post
But see, some actually do advise such actions.

However, I'm glad to see you don't! Thanks for the explanation, I appreciate it.
No problem lol. What I should have said was no decent training methods include punching. Lol
x8jason8x is offline  
post #25 of 31 Old 06-25-2013, 10:17 AM Thread Starter
Foal
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Idaho <3
Posts: 73
• Horses: 0
Hmm I guess I don't understand how keeping its ears up is going to put it in a better mood. If someone told me to put on a smile when I was upset I'd probably get more upset haha
Posted via Mobile Device
pinkbow is offline  
post #26 of 31 Old 06-25-2013, 11:35 AM
Weanling
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: North, way up North.
Posts: 551
• Horses: 0
Quote:
Originally Posted by pinkbow View Post
Hmm I guess I don't understand how keeping its ears up is going to put it in a better mood. If someone told me to put on a smile when I was upset I'd probably get more upset haha
Posted via Mobile Device
It's not about getting her in a better mood. Forward ears indicate an alert horse, not necessarily a happy one. If her ears are forward, her focus is on you. You have her attention.

O-Ba-Gee-Ba-Jabba-Joy!
JaphyJaphy is offline  
post #27 of 31 Old 06-25-2013, 11:36 AM
Yearling
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Pacific NW
Posts: 1,320
• Horses: 2
Quote:
Originally Posted by pinkbow View Post
Hmm I guess I don't understand how keeping its ears up is going to put it in a better mood. If someone told me to put on a smile when I was upset I'd probably get more upset haha
Posted via Mobile Device
Ears are more of an indicator of the horse's state. If you wait until the horse's ears are forward, you've waited until the horse has decided not to be aggressive or in a bad mood anymore. (EDIT: at least for that moment, they're not focused on their bad mood and are attentive as JaphyJaphy mentioned)

Most people cannot MAKE a horse put their ears forward in the sense that we can tell one another to put a smile on. On the flip side, if you do something that gets their ears forward like making a noise or moving quickly, you've directed their attention away from their bad mood, much like asking a four-year-old who's crying over a boo-boo to tell you how many horses they see in the pasture. They forget about what they were in a bad mood about and up come their ears! (The exception to this is clicker training, where you CAN train a horse to have ears forward, which then basically makes them "get over it" and pay attention/listen to you, which is different for a horse than telling you to smile.)
jillybean19 is offline  
post #28 of 31 Old 06-25-2013, 12:50 PM
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Seattle, WA
Posts: 38,489
• Horses: 2
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chevaux View Post
QUOTE=tinyliny;2885570]another technicque I have used when I go out into the pasture to get a horse, and the other horses walk behind me and get too close, uninvited, I take the lead rope and the halter ....
My variation on this is a stick - technically an old branch which I guess would be 2-3' long. I hold it in such away that it sticks out behind me and the horse walking into my space then pokes him/herself on the stick. I don't move the stick at all so as soon as they back off they've made their own release from pressure and get the message with minimum trauma.[/QUOTE]


I spose that will work too. The reason this "tail"thing works so well is that move like a pissy mare. I kind of hunker down a bit and stick my tail toward them and start to back into them, just the way a mare does when she's threatening to kick. They get the message very clearly. And, I often will have like three horses following me, so this will make all of them move off, instead of an immobile stick than only one will run into..
tinyliny is offline  
post #29 of 31 Old 06-26-2013, 03:49 PM
Green Broke
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Missouri
Posts: 3,734
• Horses: 3
Those who say you can't get a horse to put ears up if sulled up are wrong. By increasing intensity of your own body language and using your voice or lightly shaking halter and telling horse to shape up, you can get those ears up and horse in different frame of mind quickly. In herd situations the lead horse does just this. Leader rightly regards those ears pinned as other horse having attitude, and fixes it.

As to OP.

Looked at the few pictures you have...and the one where is following human? That is an attitude and not a good one either. She thinks she is running the show in that shot, and not a good thing for one to think. You'd be better off to not let her follow you like this. She gets a little bigger and she will come up, wheel and kick out and then you will wish you hadn't done this. And one where she is in front of human is not a good idea either to do with foal, as gets them too familiar and too cocky.

You don't need to let this horse or any horse lick you, ever. Bad habit to get into, and darn sure hard to break later. And if horse is showing ear pinning now, coupling that with licking will make problems down the road.

As for popping horse in mouth making one headshy? BS. Hit the end that offends, and make it count too. Never seen a horse become headshy IF the person was determined to get point across. If someone is flailing away without intent to end behavior, it will make a horse worse in terms of it will come back at you harder.

But never had one become headshy because of getting popped in nose, or smacked on jaw. Have got the unwanted behavior stopped though.

As for whoever said horses don't do things to hurt or displease?

That is also BS. Either you don't have that much horse experience or you don't pay attention to what is going on in terms of dynamics. Horses have a mind of their own, and many times what they want or don't want is expressed with a kick, or they sull up, but when they kick? What do you think they are doing? Pilates?

Horses make me a better person.

Last edited by Palomine; 06-26-2013 at 03:57 PM.
Palomine is offline  
post #30 of 31 Old 06-26-2013, 04:05 PM
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Seattle, WA
Posts: 38,489
• Horses: 2
I horse's ears move to where they are thinking. You'll see a horse's ears lightly back when they are listening to the rider, or often, just one ear back. When they PIN the ears, their emotional state is beyond just paying attention to something. It's in an aggressive posture or very irritated. So, the ear is no longer pointing toward what they are thinking about. Or, maybe it is, since at that time they are reacting to internal emotions , so are inside of themselves.
tinyliny is offline  
Reply

Tags
ear pinning , filly , foal , pinned ears , training

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

Already have a Horse Forum account?
Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

New to the Horse Forum?
Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.



User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in









Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.


Old Thread Warning
This thread is more than 90 days old. When a thread is this old, it is often better to start a new thread rather than post to it. However, If you feel you have something of value to add to this particular thread, you can do so by checking the box below before submitting your post.

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Pinning Ears Horsegal16 Horse Breeding 12 08-08-2012 11:10 PM
Pinning ears while riding Equilove Horse Training 15 07-10-2012 09:56 AM
Pinning ears and getting into my space. Lorri D Turner Horse Training 1 10-28-2011 10:19 PM
Pinning ears with food Wheatermay Horse Training 3 09-17-2011 08:54 AM
Pinning her ears at me? Wallaby Horse Training 12 10-20-2009 07:51 PM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome