First Horse I've owned. Kicking problem? - Page 2 - The Horse Forum
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post #11 of 37 Old 08-08-2013, 09:51 PM
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Also by chasing them you are moving their feet and establishing respect and showing you are the lead mare and in charge. If a horse turns its butt on me in the pasture then I'll chase them away from me. I don't put up with that behavior AT ALL!
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post #12 of 37 Old 08-08-2013, 10:03 PM Thread Starter
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So basically anything showing that this kind or behavior isn't acceptable. Either chasing off, hitting (in a disciplinary sense) and making him obey even when he tries to do otherwise. I already had the basic ideas down, and when I am working with him I make sure that I don't cut him the slack to do what he wants. I must be slipping in some areas, and I Will be sure to keep an eye on what I am doing more closely.
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post #13 of 37 Old 08-08-2013, 10:04 PM
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Sounds like you got it down :) good luck
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post #14 of 37 Old 08-08-2013, 10:04 PM
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The horse was feeling his oats, the stormy weather contributed to that, & he was playing. If you watch two horses being rambunctious, running at pasture, they'll kick out at each other like yours did at you, but it's NOT in the spirit of disrespect, it's play.

There's a famous video on youtube of a white horse playing with a girl, following her over jumps at liberty, & at one point he kicked at her while passing by her (& it did make contact with her head.) He was not disrespecting her, either, he was playing in the way horses play.

What you do is understand that the heels often go up when the horse is playing, & you never allow yourself to be in the vulnerable position of being within kicking distance; that's YOUR responsibility.

Reprimanding the horse for "disrespect" here is going to confuse the horse, who'll then have a hard time respecting you as his leader (a good leader understands horses), THEN you'll have a respect issue, but it'll be your fault.
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post #15 of 37 Old 08-08-2013, 10:08 PM
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I horse won't turn his back on something that he considers "important". anything that will either do something he likes, such as a nice scratch on the wither, or will do something he doesn't, like make a commotion or swish the leadline out at him like a lead mare biting an underling is something worth watching, and not turning his butt to.
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post #16 of 37 Old 08-08-2013, 10:11 PM
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Originally Posted by Northern View Post
The horse was feeling his oats, the stormy weather contributed to that, & he was playing. If you watch two horses being rambunctious, running at pasture, they'll kick out at each other like yours did at you, but it's NOT in the spirit of disrespect, it's play.

There's a famous video on youtube of a white horse playing with a girl, following her over jumps at liberty, & at one point he kicked at her while passing by her (& it did make contact with her head.) He was not disrespecting her, either, he was playing in the way horses play.

What you do is understand that the heels often go up when the horse is playing, & you never allow yourself to be in the vulnerable position of being within kicking distance; that's YOUR responsibility.

Reprimanding the horse for "disrespect" here is going to confuse the horse, who'll then have a hard time respecting you as his leader (a good leader understands horses), THEN you'll have a respect issue, but it'll be your fault.

while I agree with you that a horse will kick out in play, I do recall that video and the horse in question was very irritated and was changing from a horse that is happily following the lead , to one that is irritated about being made to move by an "underling". it was NOT just rambunctiousness, there was a clear expression of contempt and irritation to that horse, the gray in the famous video who kicked the girl in the head.
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post #17 of 37 Old 08-08-2013, 10:25 PM
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ETA: Of course, a horse will kick another horse in the spirit of "disrespect", but I don't like the word, because humans get caught up in believing that horses disrespect humans, then punish them. It's really the eternal vying for dominance, one's place in the hierarchy, & among horses, it's not taken personally.

Horses have no trouble knowing whether a kick is in exuberant play or in vying for dominance. Humans need to discern the difference, too.
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post #18 of 37 Old 08-08-2013, 10:38 PM
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Ok, someone should post that video to this thread.

What, tiny, was the human doing, in your opinion, that caused the alleged irritation in the horse's mind? (Perhaps that she was running him around in a junky yard? Kidding!) I recall the horse enjoying, getting treats for following girl around.
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post #19 of 37 Old 08-08-2013, 10:45 PM Thread Starter
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Usually he follows me around at a respectful distance whenever I enter the pasture, even without a lead rope. This is a good sign that he does respect me, is it not? I want to be sure that I do have a handle on him seeing me as his leader and that I am not in complete disillusionment, lol. My fiancée grew up around horses all of his life and knows a whole lot more about them then I do, but right now he is away overseas (please, pray for our marines) and I don't have his guidance as much at the moment. So, you all have no idea how much I appreciate your help.
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post #20 of 37 Old 08-08-2013, 11:04 PM
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Originally Posted by Squirrelle View Post
Usually he follows me around at a respectful distance whenever I enter the pasture, even without a lead rope. This is a good sign that he does respect me, is it not?...Yes. Unless you were being annoying when the incident happened, he was just expressing his playfulness.
Hope that helps!
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