Friendliest stud I ever encountered
 
 

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Friendliest stud I ever encountered

This is a discussion on Friendliest stud I ever encountered within the New to Horses forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category

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    • 2 Post By Sharpie
    • 1 Post By dlady
    • 6 Post By EdmontonHorseGal
    • 2 Post By Yogiwick
    • 1 Post By jimmyp
    • 1 Post By beverleyy

     
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        02-02-2014, 11:12 PM
      #1
    Weanling
    Friendliest stud I ever encountered

    I have been around a few studs and most of them needed an attitude adjustment. But not Jake. He has the weirdest craziest looking eyes I ever saw on a horse, but was super friendly. I named him Jake after my grandfather because he had that same crazy look in his eyes when he started going blind. I guess he figured the wider he opened his eyes, the better he could see.

    I was walking in the pasture with a few horses that was recently rescued. It came running across the pasture behind me. When I turned to look at it, he stopped. I turned around and started walking it walked a few feet behind me, always stopping when I stopped. I finally turned and faced him. He just stood there until I put my hand out then he came up to me and sniffed it. I rubbed on him for a few minutes and he seemed to like the attention. I put a rope halter and lead rope on him and he was the perfect gentleman. He lunged him at a walk and he yield his forequarters, hind quarters, flexes like a dream.

    I realize that he is a rescue and his whole attitude may change after he has gotten plenty of nourishment and get a little weight on him. He's said to be around 5 or 6 years old. He looks to be around 14.2 - 15 hands. I will measure him next weekend when I'm out there.

    I was out at the farm yesterday and today, he still the same friendly horse with me. He's being kept in a stall in the barn, but there's a small paddock for him to be turned out in. The vet will be out to check on the rescues sometime this week. I was told that I could keep him but haven't made up my mind yet. I told them to give me a few months to see how he acts after he's gelded and fattened up.

    He's 5-6 and was in a pasture with many mares, most of which were pregnant. Over 10 of the horses there were studs.

    If he's gelded at this age will he have a studish behavior?


    Excuse my spelling
         
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        02-02-2014, 11:24 PM
      #2
    Green Broke
    Doesn't sound like he's really studish atm. I'm also guessing he was not the one breeding the mares. I don't see why he'd be any studier after gelding. Sounds like he'd make a wonderful gelding. Only way to tell is to see, health will make a difference in his overall demeanor regardless of sex.
         
        02-02-2014, 11:48 PM
      #3
    Started
    Generally, gelding will only make them better behaved. If he is already a gentleman, gelding will only help him stay that way as he fattens up and feels a bit better. Not all stallions are evil, especially if they've been kept in a herd with other horses and get exercise, social interaction, and taught to mind their manners from other horses and humans.
    Yogiwick and cayenne like this.
         
        02-03-2014, 01:15 AM
      #4
    Weanling
    Thanks for the responses. I want to nourish him for a couple of weeks before I have him gelded. I'll see what the vet suggest. He's kind of ribby, but not nearly as bad as some I've seen posted on here.

    Our friend works at a rescue facility and foster animals on their farm when the shelters are full. They can only take in a few of them on their farm. They also give riding lessons and train horses. I want to work with training a horse, so I have 2 assigned to me that I will be working with under their supervision.
    Yogiwick likes this.
         
        02-03-2014, 02:14 AM
      #5
    Weanling
    IMO a stallion's behaviour is about 99% what we train into them and only 1% what is already in their brain to begin with.

    The stud at my barn lives in a paddock in a high traffic area right next to the outdoor arena. If you weren't told he was a stud, you'd think he was a lazy laid back gelding or mare. Other than a nicker when another horse comes near, all he cares about is his hay, and the potential for treats from nearby humans. He's broke, and when he gets out to ride he's a perfect gentleman regardless of the riding company. That is what a stud should act like.

    Sadly, most people treat them like some creature to be feared and locked up, segregated from other horses 24/7 except for when breeding. Then the stallion starts acting like something to be feared and locked up, because his behaviour is influenced by his care and handling. Then people view the stud as dangerous and believe other studs are dangerous. You see where this perpetual loop of (what I believe is) stallion abuse is going? :(
         
        02-03-2014, 01:56 PM
      #6
    Green Broke
    ^ I agree with this post, but not with the "99%" part. There are also lots of stories of very well trained well behaved stallions suddenly snapping and doing something completely out of character and dangerous, because that is what a stallion is.

    I know one stud who was practically a gelding (I'm starting to think he had hormone issues) and another breeding stud who was extremely well behaved and well mannered but was still very obviously a stallion. Training is extremely relevant but so is the horses personality/hormones.

    Think this is going a little OT though :P
    Palomine and Foxhunter like this.
         
        02-03-2014, 02:28 PM
      #7
    Started
    There is a three year old Morgan stud at our barn. He is the nicest guy ever and loves people. He is respectful and the owner rides him with cattle, barrels, and drives him. He listens nicely - although I wish the rider had a little lighter hands on him because he really doens't need his face to be jerked around....
         
        02-03-2014, 03:54 PM
      #8
    Weanling
    Most studs act like fools because their owners make excuses for them.... Our RMH breeding stud acts like a perfect gentleman we use him to pony mares and fillies on a regular basis and he is rode almost daily with mares.

    As far as gelding him, it will almost always cool ones jets. We had a breeding QH stud on the farm he was used to breed several times at our place and before we got him (and was a jerk....). Once he was cut, he became a whole other animal. Most wont make a night and day change, but they will usually be a noticeably different critter.

    Jim
    dlady likes this.
         
        02-03-2014, 06:28 PM
      #9
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by EdmontonHorseGal    
    IMO a stallion's behaviour is about 99% what we train into them and only 1% what is already in their brain to begin with.

    The stud at my barn lives in a paddock in a high traffic area right next to the outdoor arena. If you weren't told he was a stud, you'd think he was a lazy laid back gelding or mare. Other than a nicker when another horse comes near, all he cares about is his hay, and the potential for treats from nearby humans. He's broke, and when he gets out to ride he's a perfect gentleman regardless of the riding company. That is what a stud should act like.

    Sadly, most people treat them like some creature to be feared and locked up, segregated from other horses 24/7 except for when breeding. Then the stallion starts acting like something to be feared and locked up, because his behaviour is influenced by his care and handling. Then people view the stud as dangerous and believe other studs are dangerous. You see where this perpetual loop of (what I believe is) stallion abuse is going? :(
    Exactly. There's currently 2 studs at my barn, and there have been 3-4 others in the past (BO sold them on though, purchased different stock for reining vs. halter pons). They are as well behaved as the geldings or mares. She doesn't treat them any differently, they are broke to ride, etc etc. Obviously they don't get turned out directly next to mares, and all the fields and paddocks are hot wired, but even so they behave just fine. The outdoor is right next to a couple of the fields as well as some of the smaller paddocks, the studs don't care, and only one of my mares "likes" being around them (ex-broodie).

    It's all how you handle them from the get-go IMHO. Treat them like some crazy, dangerous animal, and that's what they will become. Same for any horse, mares or geldings or studs. Give them proper training and care and they should behave as any other horse.
    Sharpie likes this.
         
        02-03-2014, 09:38 PM
      #10
    Weanling
    I've heard so many stories about studs being hard to handle and actually encountered 1 that was a complete nut but mostly because he was kept locked up in a stall all the time. In at least 3 months, I think the only time it was out of the stall was when it broke out. I would probably get a little crazy being locked away. Poor thing ran around for about 2 hours like it was having the time of it's life.

    But this one is the sweetest horse I've met. I have an appy and a quarter horse at home that I can do anything with, but all horses have their off days. But this stud is so laid back and easy for me to handle. LOL I saw him pin his ears once, not all the way back, at the man that owns the stable. Never with a female though. I told him that maybe he preferred ladies. He's very tolerant of his wife and daughter, but just don't want the man to touch him.

    At the stables where I take riding lessons there was 1 stud and his only pasture mate was a goat. The goat was his best friend and he didn't like it if you took the goat out.
         

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