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got a trainer -- and lots of "homework"

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        02-04-2014, 09:48 AM
      #21
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by dlady    
    Just noticed you were in MS. Howdy neighbor. It rained all day Sunday here too.

    LOL keep posting your exercises. I'll do them at home when the weather permits.

    Have fun and good luck.
    awesome -- hi-5 neighbor

    I am about 30 minutes south of Jackson ... might miss lessons on Sunday because of the rain

    You going to the Dixie National Rodeo next weekend?
         
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        02-04-2014, 08:04 PM
      #22
    Foal
    I'm in Victoria, that's about 20 minutes from Memphis TN. Not going to the rodeo but waiting on the weather to get better so we can go to Stinkin Jim's for trail riding in the spring.
    jmike likes this.
         
        02-05-2014, 02:06 AM
      #23
    Weanling
    I just "mastered" the sitting trot. Yay. Here is the technique my trainer taught me:

    1. Keep your feet very light in the stirrups (it actually helps to use none because too much pressure on your feet encourages bouncing in newbies).

    2. With the reins in hand, grab the horn if riding Western or saddle pad if riding English, and lean waaaay back in the saddle. This is to encourage a very deep seat. It's not "proper" riding posture; it's just there for training purposes and temporary. It really works, I promise, and it doesn't develop bad habits. It's actually safer and nicer for the horse's back too than a person banging away in the saddle.

    3. Breathe in and out regularly. It's normal to hold your breath when you're stressed.

    4. If you're still bouncing, lean back more.

    5. Relax those butt muscles.

    6. Keep your eyes looking out far. "Soft eyes", looking in the general direction where you want the horse to go, not laser-focused on one thing out in front. Definitely don't look at the ground below you or the horse's neck. It can throw off your balance.

    7. After you're comfy and balanced doing this, practice letting go of the reins with one hand and holding that arm out laterally, for about 50 beats (horse steps). Then reverse and do the other arm. Then drop both reins and do both arms (harder). Once you can do the seated trot (with no stirrups) with both arms out to the sides comfortably, you know you have decent balance.

    8. Do the seated trot without stirrups. Also practice putting your feet in and then out of the stirrups while the horse maintains the trot. You will learn that if you don't do it keeping your seat and balance, your horse will pick up the cues and stop. It's a delicate balance to sending the go signal while also messing around with the stirrups.

    9. Make sure to do both directions around the riding ring/arena every time, so you don't get to leaning one side or the other and so your horse doesn't get stiff. Plus you'll find it's easier sometimes going one direction or the other due to the horse just naturally preferring one side over the other, so being good when it's tough is good practice.

    10. After you've done a ton of miles with these exercises, you'll be able to sit up in a normal position, have your feet in the stirrups, and actually feel the rhythm of the horse that you can ride the trot to. Before then, I wouldn't worry about the rhythm.
    dlady, jmike and AFull99 like this.
         
        02-05-2014, 08:44 AM
      #24
    Showing
    When you are mounted, bend your leg and lift it as high as you can out to the side and back. Don't lean away. Then do the other side. This helps open your hips. As the horse trots, try to absorb the action thro your hips with a side to side motion, following the motion you are feeling. You'll learn to "disconnect" you spine by relaxing it. Lots of practice and lots of laughing. If you feel frustrated, do something else and come back to it.
         
        02-05-2014, 09:52 AM
      #25
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by ecasey    
    I just "mastered" the sitting trot. Yay. Here is the technique my trainer taught me:

    1. Keep your feet very light in the stirrups (it actually helps to use none because too much pressure on your feet encourages bouncing in newbies).

    2. With the reins in hand, grab the horn if riding Western or saddle pad if riding English, and lean waaaay back in the saddle. This is to encourage a very deep seat. It's not "proper" riding posture; it's just there for training purposes and temporary. It really works, I promise, and it doesn't develop bad habits. It's actually safer and nicer for the horse's back too than a person banging away in the saddle.

    3. Breathe in and out regularly. It's normal to hold your breath when you're stressed.

    4. If you're still bouncing, lean back more.

    5. Relax those butt muscles.

    6. Keep your eyes looking out far. "Soft eyes", looking in the general direction where you want the horse to go, not laser-focused on one thing out in front. Definitely don't look at the ground below you or the horse's neck. It can throw off your balance.

    7. After you're comfy and balanced doing this, practice letting go of the reins with one hand and holding that arm out laterally, for about 50 beats (horse steps). Then reverse and do the other arm. Then drop both reins and do both arms (harder). Once you can do the seated trot (with no stirrups) with both arms out to the sides comfortably, you know you have decent balance.

    8. Do the seated trot without stirrups. Also practice putting your feet in and then out of the stirrups while the horse maintains the trot. You will learn that if you don't do it keeping your seat and balance, your horse will pick up the cues and stop. It's a delicate balance to sending the go signal while also messing around with the stirrups.

    9. Make sure to do both directions around the riding ring/arena every time, so you don't get to leaning one side or the other and so your horse doesn't get stiff. Plus you'll find it's easier sometimes going one direction or the other due to the horse just naturally preferring one side over the other, so being good when it's tough is good practice.

    10. After you've done a ton of miles with these exercises, you'll be able to sit up in a normal position, have your feet in the stirrups, and actually feel the rhythm of the horse that you can ride the trot to. Before then, I wouldn't worry about the rhythm.
    thanks so much ecasey -- that was awesome advice -- will try it when it stops raining enough for me to get out there
    ecasey and AFull99 like this.
         
        02-05-2014, 11:36 AM
      #26
    Green Broke
    What works best for me is using my lower back as a shock absorber. I quite like the sitting trot!
    jmike and equinesnfelines like this.
         
        02-05-2014, 11:53 AM
      #27
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Zexious    
    What works best for me is using my lower back as a shock absorber. I quite like the sitting trot!
    i have to be careful with min

    Herniated disc in my lower back
         
        02-05-2014, 02:03 PM
      #28
    Green Broke
    ^Eeep! Did I miss that, somewhere? Dx I can imagine that would make it much more difficult!
    jmike likes this.
         
        02-05-2014, 02:14 PM
      #29
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Zexious    
    ^Eeep! Did I miss that, somewhere? Dx I can imagine that would make it much more difficult!
    nope -- never posted it on this forum

    But horse riding builds my core, which supports my back, and that means less pain ... just hurts while building the muscles

    Weight loss would also help ... still working on that

    But first demon is first -- got to quit smoking
    equinesnfelines likes this.
         
        02-05-2014, 02:16 PM
      #30
    Green Broke
    ^It's fantastic that you're trying to quit smoking.

    You could maybe look into back supports? It may not be a bad idea while you're building everything back up (:
         

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