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having problems with our new quarter horse

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        08-05-2013, 10:11 PM
      #21
    Yearling
    Green rider + green horse = black and blue

    I agree with the previous posts you need a trainer, for the horse and for yourself. Leading her around showing her love is not the answer. She is going to learn to be pushy and disrespectful. You and the horse need to learn about doing ground work. A young horse is not a good horse for someone with no experience. Be safe.
    smrobs and cowgirlnay like this.
         
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        08-05-2013, 10:20 PM
      #22
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by gssw5    
    Green rider + green horse = black and blue

    I agree with the previous posts you need a trainer, for the horse and for yourself. Leading her around showing her love is not the answer. She is going to learn to be pushy and disrespectful. You and the horse need to learn about doing ground work. A young horse is not a good horse for someone with no experience. Be safe.
    There is no good to come of this situation. Even with a trainer such a completely green inexperienced person will be hard pressed to deal with this situation with good results.
         
        08-05-2013, 10:20 PM
      #23
    Foal
    We arent that kind of people? We don't give up on stuff, we own 3 dogs which one is my brittany spaniel hunting dog.. I didnt give up on him, and now he's my favorite, and brought home 60 birds for me last year.. Im going to get a trainer, im not doing it because I have no idea where to start at.. I rather pay someone to train than someone get hurt.. we will just love on her and build trust and bond with her.. other wise she's great besides the riding part.. and for us its not all about the riding, we wanted a young horse so we could learn as we went..
         
        08-05-2013, 10:35 PM
      #24
    Showing
    Dustin, there is a difference between giving up on a situation that you could make it through and realizing when you are in way over your head.

    It is possible to keep this horse and make her into a very nice riding partner, but ya'll are going to need to have a trainer there every single step of the way for, I'd guess, no less than a year. You're talking about a lot of money right there just to get a horse that you can maybe ride without getting bucked off or run off with.

    No offense, but "learning as you go" is the worst possible thing you can do to yourself and to your horse. Someone who doesn't know a whole lot about horses needs to have a horse that knows the ropes. They need a horse that they can trust, a horse that can teach the rider what they need to know.

    I just don't see this ending well, but I pray I'm wrong.
         
        08-05-2013, 10:53 PM
      #25
    Green Broke
    Selling is going to be your best option, it's not that you're giving up on a horse, just that you're understanding that your skills aren't up to what the horse needs yet. By keeping such a young horse you're risking your safety, and the horses future.

    Call your farrier BEFORE they come and tell them the situation. Some will do some training for a high fee but many don't want to waste their time and risk their safety with untrained horses. They can probably recommend a trainer who can come out and teach your horse to pick up her feet.

    If you insist on keeping the horse then find a good trainer and get them out to teach you how to handle this horse on the ground. Have them evaluate the horse (they might be able to tell its age too) and work out a plan with them. They might want to come out each week, or each month, or they might want to take the horse and do some training, return it, and then do some training later.

    When looking for a trainer don't look for one that just trains horses, but one that also gives basic lessons. You're not just wanting your horse trained, you want you and your girlfriend trained too - so someone with good instruction skills is important.
    EvilHorseOfDoom and gssw5 like this.
         
        08-05-2013, 11:09 PM
      #26
    Trained
    Learning as you go is what I did. I don't recommend it.

    I bought a horse I was told was "perfect for a beginner". She was 7. I had done a little riding 30 years before, had recently retired from the US Air Force and thought I'd buy an experienced horse and learn to ride.

    Let's just say there is a reason horse sellers have a bad reputation for honesty...

    I rode her bitless because she wouldn't take a bit. She didn't buck, but she spooked a lot and seemed to be always testing me. A few months after I got her, she bolted while I was halfway thru the dismount, and I hurt my back bad enough that I had to give up jogging for 4 years (after 40 years). I continued to ride, but it hurt. She became halfway decent in a very controlled environment, but would regularly spin herself up to totally bonkers over nothing.

    I finally quit riding her, took about 5 months of lessons, and spent months riding a ranch-trained gelding we also owned. Then I hired a professional trainer, who concluded Mia had either never been broken to ride, or had barely had any training and then been left in a corral for years. If I led her off property on a lead rope, she literally did not know to pick her feet up over a small rock - she would just stumble! By that time, she was pushing 11.

    A couple of thousand dollars of training later, starting from scratch, the trainer got on her back for 5 minutes. The next day, I rode her with the trainer watching. A few months of twice weekly lessons for both of us, and I had a horse who would regularly jump sideways 6 feet a half dozen times on a trail ride...but who usually didn't bolt.

    I've now owned her for 5 1/2 years. She hasn't tried to bolt in over a year. She hasn't jumped sideways for close to a year. I still have an unorthodox style of riding, though, meant to help me stay on and stay in control - because we USED to do a lot of spins, sideways jumps, and bolts.

    In the last 6 months, my back is finally healed enough from Jan 2009's fall that I have been able to start jogging again (tough to start up at 55!) and also have enough flexibility in my lower back to start riding half-way decent. She isn't perfect, and she will NEVER be "perfect for a beginner". Our ability levels are slowly converging. In another year, we might be a very good match for each other...

    So yes, it can work. But it has been expensive, both in cash and in pain. If I had to do it over again, I would not. I was in some ways lucky. The one incident I had with her hurt the soft tissue in my back bad enough for 4.5 years of pain, but she could have just as easily have fallen on my knee and crippled me, or dumped me in the desert rocks and broken my back. There is a sticky thread that deals with this situation:

    "Playing the Hero" -- when to 'stick with it' & when to realize it's time to move on.

    In some ways, it made sense for Mia & I to stick it out. Underneath her fears, she is an exceptionally sweet and willing horse - and she has always seemed to like me. She came to fascinate me, and I think I needed that to get hooked on riding. But it also could have ended with me too crippled to ride. I've gained some wonderful experience, but I've also shelled out thousands of dollars, took more risk than I should have, picked up a lot of bad riding habits, and I still don't have a horse I trust to go out riding solo in the desert!

    You will have to make your own decision, and I hope God blesses whatever you decide - for both you and your horse. But I share this as a warning, because I know, from personal experience, that it can make a very rough road to travel.
         
        08-05-2013, 11:16 PM
      #27
    Weanling
    Thanks for sharing your story BSMS. Working with a trainer regularly over an extended period of time, is the only way to go. And with that comes the cost factor. A good trainer will get the horse to come around and then work with you to further the horse, but people have to understand that sometimes the cost put into the horse for training is more than the horse will ever be worth. I just sent mine for 2 months at almost 4 years old. I spent the money and now I've just logged on 35 hours trail riding on him. He is quiet, willing, responsive and as calm as my seasoned 25 year old. This would never have happened if it wasn't for the great trainer I had. Good for you for doing it right!
         
        08-06-2013, 01:24 AM
      #28
    Foal
    Well thanks bsms, im sorry to hear that you got hurt.. We have a couple of people coming to take a look at her.. I think we can get through this just its going to take some time..
         
        08-06-2013, 01:52 AM
      #29
    Weanling
    I tried to learn as I went. All that ended up happening was me nearly ruining a perfectly good horse due to me thinking he was tubborn and it turned out he was lame. I also had a situation many years later where my mare almost died due to an ilness. If I was not experience my mare would now be dead and I would have no horse. I also do not condone anyone to by young green horse if they don't know what they are doing. I have been riding for 7 years and I in no way belive I am ready for a young horse. I am just starting to think about getting another 10yo that I havebeen offered IMHO I would sell and get a more expeianced horse and learn, or even lease the 2YO and get yourself an older horse
         
        08-06-2013, 03:22 AM
      #30
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by dustinwhite87    
    we arent that kind of people? We don't give up on stuff, we own 3 dogs which one is my brittany spaniel hunting dog.. I didnt give up on him, and now he's my favorite, and brought home 60 birds for me last year.. Im going to get a trainer, im not doing it because I have no idea where to start at.. I rather pay someone to train than someone get hurt.. we will just love on her and build trust and bond with her.. other wise she's great besides the riding part.. and for us its not all about the riding, we wanted a young horse so we could learn as we went..

    I regret to inform you this is the worst idea possible. Beginners should never learn with young horses, sounds like you guys need an experienced push button pony. This is the mind-set many people have, sadly. They want to watch the horse grow and learn together. As I said, veryvery bad idea.
         

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