He Stops Loping after a view strides!
   

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He Stops Loping after a view strides!

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        10-17-2013, 06:45 PM
      #1
    Foal
    He Stops Loping after a view strides!

    So this is my lease, He seems to be in good shape as I posted in the heath fourm, I thought he could use a little weight but he is in good heath. So when I am in the out door ring, I can lope him and when I do and he starts going he only goes for a few strides ( like 10 ) and then stops, I don't understand what it is. When I feel him to sttart to slow down I get after him but it doesnt work he just ends up going into a trot then walk... I don't know if I need to build up the musclel to do it for a whole lap or what? But the funny thing is when he was in the field (25arc) he woudnt stop loping, I had to make him stopp so I have no idea....i know he can do it because he showed me he can in the field. Any ideas?
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        10-17-2013, 07:08 PM
      #2
    Weanling
    It sounds like he needs to gain some muscle and get his body used to cantering with a rider on him. It's allot easier for a horse to canter freely in a field than it is tacked up collected and with a rider on his back. Just do allot of trotting for a couple weeks and he should eventually keep cantering. This could also be because he had and owner that only liked to canter for short periods of time (People are weird haha). Are you an experienced rider? Are you bouncing around allot when he canters? If so you might be irritating him! Let me know.
    Corporal likes this.
         
        10-17-2013, 07:12 PM
      #3
    Foal
    Sorry for the miss communication, when he was in the field he was all tacked up with me on his back, and he kept going, and I have been riding for a couple months now, so my lope isnt crazy bouncy I know how to control it, but I can see what you mean that may be it... I was thinking it was muscle too, and he did only have one previous owner where he was the only horse, so he WHINEYS all the time, we are working on that also.
    LyraFreedom likes this.
         
        10-17-2013, 07:13 PM
      #4
    Foal
    I am also going to have my friend ride him who has been riding for years to see if he does the same thing, if he doesnt than we know its ME and not him LOL
    Corporal and LyraFreedom like this.
         
        10-17-2013, 07:15 PM
      #5
    Yearling
    Were you on him when he was in the field loping? Or just watching him?

    My first thought would be he has transferred his weight and yours is now on his forehand... so he is pulling himself.
    To truly lope they need to lighten their front end by transferring their weight to the hind end, lightening the front and pushing off from behind. Only horse I have ever seen gallop heavy on the forehand is a racing Thoroughbred, but exercise riders and jockeys are like statues in quiet riding of their bodies and keeping their weight balanced above the horses
    Center of gravity.

    My thought would be you are leaning forward enough as you start to move off that you are putting hi slightly off-balance as you continue... so making it much harder for him to remain steady and balanced in his gait.

    Even his picture you posted he looks slightly heavy on his forehand... not pushing but pulling.... add your weight to that and he can't continue this for long.
    You need to elevate his front and allow him to round his back so he can reach under and push... and you need to get off his brakes...NO, not his mouth...his spinal column and muscles are part of his braking system.

    jmo...
    aerie likes this.
         
        10-17-2013, 07:16 PM
      #6
    Super Moderator
    Can't and Won't are different . This is a case of "Won't"
    He lopes in the fiield becuase he basically wants to , or at least doesn't mind. In the arena, he is bored and knows that by stopping he can get out of work. That is "won't" , not a "can't".

    Look to yourself and your clearness of leadership here.
    jamesqf, waresbear and Foxhunter like this.
         
        10-17-2013, 07:22 PM
      #7
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by tinyliny    
    Can't and Won't are different . This is a case of "Won't"
    He lopes in the fiield becuase he basically wants to , or at least doesn't mind. In the arena, he is bored and knows that by stopping he can get out of work. That is "won't" , not a "can't".

    Look to yourself and your clearness of leadership here.
    what do you mean look to your self for leadership, what should I do? When he stops I tell him to keep going by using pressure and clicking and kissing but nothing
         
        10-17-2013, 07:28 PM
      #8
    Foal
    Then you keep going after him until he listens, then the second he goes just a step further than what you ask you tell him to stop. Soon he will realize that he can't stop when he wants and that it will be less work in the long run to just wait for your cue to slow down. However, as another poster suggested he may not have enough stamina or muscle to keep going for long periods of time. I would continue to work on trotting and getting him to use his back and behind correctly before working on a ton of cantering/loping.
         
        10-17-2013, 07:36 PM
      #9
    Yearling
    Does he always try to stop or slow in the same area of the arena?
    Horses are creatures of habit, ours.

    If his owner rode him, then stopped and got off at the same place generally or after a particular routine and time frame he is anticipating this.
    If he does this coming toward the "gate", he got you...never ever pull up, or get off near the gate. This becomes a horrible habit in a hurry and so hard to correct and break.

    You need to ride him stronger, push harder when you feel him start to get balky and ride him past this point in time and place.
    You need to possibly push him with your butt and legs and "drive" him but not lean and send him mixed signals at the same time. It is hard not knowing how advanced your riding is and how sensitive this horse is to you and your weight shifting you not even realize you may be doing.

    This can also be a "respect" issue... he could be testing to see if you are going to make him do as you want or if he can do as he pleases.
    Respect and you being "herd leader {lead mare}"...from the ground on up to astride work make sure you have the horses respect, attention and correct attitude at all times.
         
        10-17-2013, 07:39 PM
      #10
    Trained
    If this is something he always does in the arena, then it is predictable, right? So, KEEP YOU LEG ON HIM! It is much easier to keep him going than to get him going again. If you need to use a crop, then do it, but he has now learned he can do this!

    I would also suggest, and this seems so simple, but it works for me......make sure you are looking up. Look and act like you are going somewhere. Chances are that is what you did in the field, but in the arena many of us tend to look down......
    dlady and horselovinguy like this.
         

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