Help with riding lessons! - Page 2 - The Horse Forum

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post #11 of 37 Old 09-30-2013, 03:12 PM
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Originally Posted by bsms View Post
Depending on which study you believe, jumping increases the chance of serious injury 10 to 40-fold. There was a time instructors tried to get their students jumping in 12-20 lessons. But back then, if someone broke their shoulder or neck riding, the courts would ignore it.
bsms - I've seen you quote the study that jumping increases the risk of serious injury up to 40 before, and I can't find it anywhere. Can you post it? Thanks.

Back to the OP, when you jump depends on a lot of things. Examples: A good instructor, good school horses, the length of your lessons (1/2 hour or 1 hour) and how often you take riding lessons. 8 lessons in 8 days or 8 lessons in 8 weeks makes a big difference in how quickly you advance. I have seen riders jumping by their 2nd lesson and I have seen riders take much longer. There is no hard and fast rule. But whenever it happens, remember to have fun along the way!
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post #12 of 37 Old 09-30-2013, 03:37 PM
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If you can walk, trot and canter perfectly with no stirrups and you can hold a two-point in walk, trot and canter for over 10 minutes per gait....

Then I will teach you how to jump.
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Horses are scared of two things... Things that move and things that don't.
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post #13 of 37 Old 09-30-2013, 05:27 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by jamesqf View Post
Why should you necessarily EVER do jumping? (Bar hopping over small creeks & ditches.) Is it your goal?
Jumping seems fun for me, why ur sayng that
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post #14 of 37 Old 09-30-2013, 05:44 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by updownrider View Post
bsms - I've seen you quote the study that jumping increases the risk of serious injury up to 40 before, and I can't find it anywhere. Can you post it? Thanks.

Back to the OP, when you jump depends on a lot of things. Examples: A good instructor, good school horses, the length of your lessons (1/2 hour or 1 hour) and how often you take riding lessons. 8 lessons in 8 days or 8 lessons in 8 weeks makes a big difference in how quickly you advance. I have seen riders jumping by their 2nd lesson and I have seen riders take much longer. There is no hard and fast rule. But whenever it happens, remember to have fun along the way!
If ANYONE is jumping by their second lesson, they need a new instructor. I don't care how "natural" of a rider you are, if you've only been on a horse twice, you shouldn't be jumping, let alone trotting off the lunge line.
I hope you are grossly exaggerating, here.
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post #15 of 37 Old 09-30-2013, 06:39 PM
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I can't add to what anyone else above has said.

What has your riding instructor planned for your riding? If you or she/he haven't talked about your long term riding, maybe you should start there.

"SUCCESS is not what horse you have . . . but what you do with that horse."
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post #16 of 37 Old 09-30-2013, 06:53 PM
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Originally Posted by Francisco Abreu View Post
Jumping seems fun for me, why ur sayng that
Because I'm wondering why you seem to be in such a rush to get to jumping. While on the other hand, I (still very much a beginning rider despite a couple of years of riding on trails & across country through forests & brush) have never jumped more than those hops across small creeks &c, and don't ever see a reason to.

Apart from the risk of injury to me (which honestly doesn't bother me all that much), I get really paranoid about what could happen to my horse if I recklessly jumped her in the sort of places I ride. I've already spent one hour holding a tourniquet on a spurting leg wound: that's enough to last me a lifetime.
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post #17 of 37 Old 09-30-2013, 07:08 PM
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The 40 times figure comes from a review of USCTA Accident Statistics for 1990 and 1991 (American Medical Equestrian Associaton).

"The place where most accidents occurred was on cross country. Cross country involves jumping fixed obstacles at speed. If a hors hits one of these obstacles, either the rider or horse and rider will fall. The second most common area was either stadium or other unspecified. Warmup areas for the jumping phases were the next most likely place for an injury. It comes as no surprise the jumping phases accounted for 86% of the injuries. Dressage accounted for only 1% and the stable area and other accounted for 12%, again indicating the surprisingly large number of unmounted injuries."

If one assumes twice as many events involving jumping, then the 86:1 ration of injuries would give about a 40 fold increase in injuries during jumping. The last time I looked for more current statistics, the report basically divided the injuries into during the jump and just before & after the jump. It had dropped the dressage phase, apparently from lack of injuries.

These are crude measures. There was another study that had:

A Cambridge University study of 1000 riding accident hospital admissions has shown:5

* One injury for 100 h of leisure riding
* One injury for 5 h for amateur racing over jumps
* One injury for 1 h of cross-country eventing

That would be a 20-fold increase, but those figures sound very high to me. You can find it referred here:

Spinal injuries resulting from horse riding accidents

I do think it is reasonably established that jumping involves significantly greater risk than riding the flat, and thus warrants safety steps like good instruction, use of helmet, etc.

"There goes Earl!"
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post #18 of 37 Old 09-30-2013, 07:14 PM
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Believe it or not, jumping is the end of a process. Learning to jump starts with have a strong position so that if the horse stops suddenly, or spins you don't come off. It's not only strong in the way that you can stay on, but that you can use your aids without changing your position or balance. You should have excellent hands and a very stable leg before you move onto practicing your two point position at the trot and canter. You must learn to maintain a steady rhythm without argument from the horse, learn how to lengthen and shorten strides, to do small and large circles at different paces. Usually I'd say it would take a rider a minimum of about 50 hours of riding to get a good walk/trot/canter while being able to have a stable positions and clear aids. However, this depends on the rider, the instructor, the horse, frequency of riding etc and could take far longer.

Once you have these things down pat, then you'll be ready to start small jumping, grids etc. Don't rush it. Jumping, and riding in general, is fun but it's a long process. Even when you're good enough to ride on your own 90% of riding isn't jumping, galloping around etc, it's reinforcing aids, ensuring you have control etc. Whether you are a trail rider, jumper, dressage you still work with structure.
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post #19 of 37 Old 09-30-2013, 07:21 PM
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Originally Posted by Francisco Abreu View Post
Thanks, but I almost fell cause the horse was going crazy, and im strong and tall that's why I didnt fell of the horse
crazy how? Did he spook?

Equestrianism; 10% luck, 20% skill, 15% concentrated power of will, 5% pleasure, 50% pain and 100% reason to remember you're absolutely insane to be riding a beast that big.
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post #20 of 37 Old 09-30-2013, 07:51 PM
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Originally Posted by xlionesss View Post
If ANYONE is jumping by their second lesson, they need a new instructor. I don't care how "natural" of a rider you are, if you've only been on a horse twice, you shouldn't be jumping, let alone trotting off the lunge line.
I hope you are grossly exaggerating, here.
Why ever would I grossly exaggerate? What would be the point?

You would be surprised at what some people can accomplish if they have excelled in other sports.
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