How To Give Advice to A New Rider??? - Page 2
 
 

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How To Give Advice to A New Rider???

This is a discussion on How To Give Advice to A New Rider??? within the New to Horses forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category

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        10-19-2013, 10:37 AM
      #11
    Foal
    Gosh, a 13 yr old wanting to teach a 10 yr old to ride? Not a good idea. No offence but you're 13 and you've been around horses your "whole life"...which is no time at all. I'm ancient - 48 yrs old - and I bought my first horse 15 mths ago. I learnt to ride and care for horses during my teenage years. I saved up pocket money, I got jobs and I paid for a professional riding instructor to teach me. Not just riding but safety around horses, correct use and care of tack and equipment, tacking up, feeding, rugging, etc etc.

    I'm still learning and I probably won't stop. Horses are a great teacher but the handler really has to have their wits about them when they're still a novice. That means horse handling under adult supervision in my opinion.

    Horses are expensive. If there is no room in the parent's budget for lessons, I wonder why they purchased a horse for their child in the first place? This isn't being rude, but it seems a little short-sighted to me.

    I would not be working this horse until the thrush has been remedied. It's a pretty painful infection in the hoof that can make the horse lame in the long term. Has a vet been out to prescribe a course of treatment as yet? If not, I'd strongly suggest that happens, and the sooner the better. Also, any infection can weaken the hoof's structures over time, which leads to all sorts of issues for the horse and can also mean permanent lameness.

    Best of luck.
         
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        10-19-2013, 03:31 PM
      #12
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Petlover500    
    I found that quite rude.

    She got a horse for her birthday.
    And she wants to know how to ride.
    Everyone has to start at one point or another.
    And teachers, well that can't just go off and teach! They have to learn the right way to do it.
    I'm sorry you thought I was being rude but I wasn't. Maybe a bit blunt with you about the situation yes. If she can't afford an instructor then she shouldn't have a horse end of.... What happens if the vet needs to be called out in an emergency??? Horses are expensive to keep and the fact that she is even riding it when it's suffering from thrush is very very cruel in itself. The infection could flare up into full blown canker if she isn't careful and that would result in a vet bill of at least 1000. Her parents are irresponsible for thinking she can take care of a horse and your poor knowledge of horse care yourself makes you a terrible instructor for her and I feel sorry for the poor horse.

    Yes this was probably quite rude but you need to see sense!!


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    EvilHorseOfDoom and Yooper like this.
         
        10-19-2013, 04:00 PM
      #13
    Foal
    Thanx guys :)
    You all really helped.
    Sorry if i was being rude :/
    I had a bad day yesterday.
    You all were very helpful and I thank you for it! :P
         
        10-19-2013, 04:48 PM
      #14
    Super Moderator
    I think a 13 year old can teach a 10 year old. I learned a LOT from my older sister, who has only 3 years on me. You are not saying that you are going to take the place of an instructor, only that in what ever capascity you can, you wish to help your cousin. Bully for you!

    Just keep in mind that you ARENT an instructor, so stick with what you really know well, and stay very, very basic, so that your cousin can benefit.

    Like someone said, horse handling skills , reading horse body language, correct and safe leading, backing, mounting.

    Watch your cousin ride (when the horse is READY, though) and take note of what she might need help with. Just have her walk. A TON can be done at a walk.
    Spellcheck and Petlover500 like this.
         
        10-19-2013, 06:36 PM
      #15
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by tinyliny    
    I think a 13 year old can teach a 10 year old. I learned a LOT from my older sister, who has only 3 years on me. You are not saying that you are going to take the place of an instructor, only that in what ever capascity you can, you wish to help your cousin. Bully for you!

    Just keep in mind that you ARENT an instructor, so stick with what you really know well, and stay very, very basic, so that your cousin can benefit.

    Like someone said, horse handling skills , reading horse body language, correct and safe leading, backing, mounting.

    Watch your cousin ride (when the horse is READY, though) and take note of what she might need help with. Just have her walk. A TON can be done at a walk.
    EXACTALY!!!! Thank you!
    Ok I will start slow, once her horse is better :)
         
        10-19-2013, 06:42 PM
      #16
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by EquineGirl1965    
    Gosh, a 13 yr old wanting to teach a 10 yr old to ride? Not a good idea. No offence but you're 13 and you've been around horses your "whole life"...which is no time at all. I'm ancient - 48 yrs old - and I bought my first horse 15 mths ago. I learnt to ride and care for horses during my teenage years. I saved up pocket money, I got jobs and I paid for a professional riding instructor to teach me. Not just riding but safety around horses, correct use and care of tack and equipment, tacking up, feeding, rugging, etc etc.

    I'm still learning and I probably won't stop. Horses are a great teacher but the handler really has to have their wits about them when they're still a novice. That means horse handling under adult supervision in my opinion.

    Horses are expensive. If there is no room in the parent's budget for lessons, I wonder why they purchased a horse for their child in the first place? This isn't being rude, but it seems a little short-sighted to me.

    I would not be working this horse until the thrush has been remedied. It's a pretty painful infection in the hoof that can make the horse lame in the long term. Has a vet been out to prescribe a course of treatment as yet? If not, I'd strongly suggest that happens, and the sooner the better. Also, any infection can weaken the hoof's structures over time, which leads to all sorts of issues for the horse and can also mean permanent lameness.

    Best of luck.
    Thank you for your reccomendations :)

    Just saying, a 14 year old could know more about Horses than a 50 year old. It just depends what you know and what you do.
         
        10-19-2013, 07:59 PM
      #17
    Weanling
    If you want to give her some pointers on her riding or show her how to pick out hooves and muck stalls properly or whatever, okay. I think by enough people have said it so that you realize that you (no matter how much you know, even if you do know a lot) cannot take the place of a qualified instructor.

    As far as her parents giving her a horse for her birthday and not budgeting for things like lessons, I'm missing the logic there. However, I'm sure something can be arranged. Do you take lessons? Who taught you to ride? Could that person teach her in exchange for work at the barn, etc?

    I would say, when showing her how to do things, try not to be condescending or a know it all. You're probably going to have to be quite patient and have to show her things again and again.
    tinyliny and EvilHorseOfDoom like this.
         
        10-19-2013, 08:20 PM
      #18
    Green Broke
    I'm a little confused about why your cousin can afford a horse, but not lessons? The latter is far less expensive!

    Like many have said, definitely seek out a trainer. Get that thrush taken care of. He really shouldn't be ridden until it is....
    EvilHorseOfDoom likes this.
         
        10-19-2013, 11:18 PM
      #19
    Foal
    Maybe a good place to start would be to let her ride behind you while she is clearing up the thrush. She can get a feel for the balance and movement of a horse that way, and develop some confidence.
    Just don't try that if you are not sure it can be done safely. A bad wreck would probably turn her off to horses for good.

    And FYI to the rest of you, there are horses out there for next to nothing. That is what my signature is about. I watch people get hurt, horses get ruined, and every winter I see horses starve because the market is so depressed that a kid can go out and buy a horse for a couple weeks allowance or less.
         
        10-20-2013, 12:10 AM
      #20
    Weanling
    As far as thrush goes, have her put apple cider vinegar in a spray bottle and spray it on 1-2 times daily. It should help it heal. TBH I wouldn't ride at all if thrush is causing pain, but that's just me.

    As far as helping her, first she needs to gain balance on a horse. It's not as easy as it sounds or looks. I learned balance best bareback at a walk, with someone leading my horse. You could definitely do that. After she is comfortable with that, lunge her in a circle around you (turning is the hardest part!) and eventually have her do it with her hands straight out to her side.
    Are you teaching her English or Western. If English you can show her how to post, while at a walk until she picks it up. You can even teach posting if she's Western. I actually like to post in my western saddle. It makes a trot a lot easier on my bum. Good luck with your cousin! And let us know how you are doing.
    Petlover500 likes this.
         

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    horse training, new to horses, not sure, trainier

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