"Lawn Grass" "Pasture Grass"? What is the difference?
   

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"Lawn Grass" "Pasture Grass"? What is the difference?

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  • What is the difference between pasture grass and other grass
  • Yard grass and horse

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    11-02-2013, 12:03 PM
  #1
Foal
"Lawn Grass" "Pasture Grass"? What is the difference?

I came across a video talking about feeding horses grass clippings. In the description of the video, the person says says "Lawn grass is higher in sugar than pasture grass, NOT good for horses". But what is the difference between lawn and pasture grass? Is this person talking about lawn grass that has been cut, or uncut lawn grass?
     
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    11-02-2013, 06:02 PM
  #2
Weanling
Feeding grass clippings to a horse can affect a horses digestive system and may cause colic or founder. Dumping a pile of grass clippings in front of a horse may cause them to them eat it too quickly leading to the chance of choking.
Damp/warm clippings can quickly develop high levels of bacteria or mould and there may be chemicals or herbicides in lawn grass that you would not find in pasture grass. Whether they are talking about cut or uncut lawn grass neither would be a good idea for your horse to eat.
     
    11-02-2013, 06:21 PM
  #3
Foal
Yes, I know. But is "grass clippings" the same as "lawn grass"?
What is the difference between lawn grass and pasture grass?
     
    11-02-2013, 06:42 PM
  #4
Green Broke
I imagine it's just a different variety designed to look good rather than pasture grass which is for eating. However people can use a variety of grass for their lawn. The stuff in my backyard is the same as in the paddock.

I'm not sure about the particular species but I'd imagine lawn grass would be higher in sugar just because it's so short. Short, green, new grass is higher in sugar, it's only when it gets taller that the sugars become "structural" or something like that.

Regardless, feeding clippings isn't a good idea.
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    11-02-2013, 06:44 PM
  #5
Trained
There is no difference at our place. The more they eat, the less I have to mow.
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    11-02-2013, 06:49 PM
  #6
Showing
By the time grass clipping are gathered fermentation begins immediately. Horses won't usually touch it when presented. Lawn grasses are usually a variety of grasses as some are more drought tolerant than others. Pasture grasses may be part of the same as seeds blow but in many areas there's a fair amount of timothy which horses fare well on.
     
    11-02-2013, 06:56 PM
  #7
Super Moderator
On my farm there isn't any difference and that is because I would not let my City Slicker DH plant fancy grass in the yard area. Our yard is part of the original pasture, therefore identical to what the horses eat.

"Lawn Grass", IMO, means when somebody has gone to the trouble and expense of making a very pretty yard for all the passers-by to comment on, while not giving a single thought as to how much starch & sugar it will shove down a horse's throat.

Regarding "grass clippings", ditto it is not good to rake up any sort of grass clippings (ex-pasture or otherwise) and feed it to a horse; especially if it's had time to ferment in the warmth of the sun.
     
    11-02-2013, 06:57 PM
  #8
Green Broke
Should never feed cut grass, or lawn clippings to horses. Can kill them.

Letting them graze on the lawn is another matter, depending on whether or not anything has been sprayed on it that is.
     
    11-02-2013, 07:27 PM
  #9
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Slaptail    
Yes, I know. But is "grass clippings" the same as "lawn grass"?
What is the difference between lawn grass and pasture grass?
Hard to know if they just said 'grass clippings' rather than 'lawn clippings'. Like others said specific lawn grass seed is there to look nice, not designed for eating.
     
    11-02-2013, 07:41 PM
  #10
Foal
Thank you for your answers, I understand now.
     

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