loner horse?
 
 

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loner horse?

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  • My yearling colt is a loner

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  • 1 Post By gssw5

 
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    08-13-2013, 07:07 PM
  #1
Foal
loner horse?

Hi my name is jon and I just got a buckskin quarter horse in the beginning of the month. I was wondering how long it takes for a horse to "become a member of a herd"?
     
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    08-13-2013, 09:10 PM
  #2
Foal
Let me give more info. Ok, so on the second of august I bought my first horse. I took her to a girls foundation (which I both volunteer at and have a daughter attending) they have say 10 or 11 horses already that are usually in 2 groups. As soon as they saw ali (my buckskin) the leader of the first group guya (3yrs old) started nipping and kicking and a few minutes later bo the big male leader of the other group joined in in picking on her. Since then she (ali) has kicked the other horses alot gave bo a bloody lower jaw and pretty much has (from what we see) been exiled from both groups she never goes around any of the other horses unless in in the pin with her playing body guard for her. So I was wondering will this ever end or will she be a exile forever.
P.s. There is one horse that I would say she has made friends with "hersey" which kinda does her own thing doesnt really belong to either hurd. There are some horse in the field next to the one ali's in that I think she's become friends with but there is a barbed wire fence between them so when I go see ali every day I check her because she's got cuts on her. Im trying to get her to become friends with the horses in her field because im trying to get her to work well with them for when we go trail riding in the mountains.
     
    08-13-2013, 09:15 PM
  #3
Yearling
When you say herd are trying to introduce the horse to the herd, or is it having trouble in the herd. Every herd dynamic is different and it depends on how strong your herd leader is and the personality of the horse your introducing. If the new horse is the dominant type and likely to challenge the others then it may take longer then a more submissive personality, that just goes to the bottom of the hierarchy.

When I get a new horse I keep it separate from my other horses for at least two weeks, they get to see each other across the fences, but no touching. Then I will put the new horse out with my lowest horse in the pecking order, and depending on how things go I introduce a another horse every couple days. I go up the pecking order, by the time my alpha gets introduced the new horse has had time to find its place in the pecking order and depending on where he is in the pecking order determines if he challenges the alpha or not. But if he does the others already know to stay out of it. I have certain combinations of horses that work and some that don't. The ones who are constantly fighting and beating each other up don't go out together. Hope this helps.

I was typing while you added more information. But putting a lone horse into an established herd is very hard for them to find a place. If you can find a way to separate her and add horses to her area, then out together she is more likely to become part of a herd. She was overwhelmed and scared being put out with so many horses and as you saw the alpha went right over and gave her the business. Think of high school clicks and how mean they can be to outsiders when they are together, but get the individuals apart and they are nicer.
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    08-13-2013, 09:39 PM
  #4
Yearling
I can't really tell you how to fix your situation but I can tell you about one of my horses.

A brood mare was purchased while in foal, she gave birth to a filly, for some reason the mare and filly was given back to the seller. The filly was never excepted by this herd, her mother was of course as she had been in this herd most of her life, the fillys dad ran with the herd. The filly was bred by the dad when she was 2 (don't throw tomatoes as I didn't have her yet!! Too young!) She was still not accepted by the herd (30-40 head of brood mares 1 stud). April of this year we took her(Lady) and Sage home to our pasture, Sage is the alpha mare, she protectes Lady but I still don't thinks she is accepted in their little herd (Sage, Lady, Cactus[filly], Cowboy[colt]). I don't think she will ever be accepted and it all stems from not being accepted in the original herd.
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    08-13-2013, 11:47 PM
  #5
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by gssw5    
When you say herd are trying to introduce the horse to the herd, or is it having trouble in the herd. Every herd dynamic is different and it depends on how strong your herd leader is and the personality of the horse your introducing. If the new horse is the dominant type and likely to challenge the others then it may take longer then a more submissive personality, that just goes to the bottom of the hierarchy.

When I get a new horse I keep it separate from my other horses for at least two weeks, they get to see each other across the fences, but no touching. Then I will put the new horse out with my lowest horse in the pecking order, and depending on how things go I introduce a another horse every couple days. I go up the pecking order, by the time my alpha gets introduced the new horse has had time to find its place in the pecking order and depending on where he is in the pecking order determines if he challenges the alpha or not. But if he does the others already know to stay out of it. I have certain combinations of horses that work and some that don't. The ones who are constantly fighting and beating each other up don't go out together. Hope this helps.

I was typing while you added more information. But putting a lone horse into an established herd is very hard for them to find a place. If you can find a way to separate her and add horses to her area, then out together she is more likely to become part of a herd. She was overwhelmed and scared being put out with so many horses and as you saw the alpha went right over and gave her the business. Think of high school clicks and how mean they can be to outsiders when they are together, but get the individuals apart and they are nicer.
that makes alot of since actually. Thank you
     
    08-14-2013, 10:22 AM
  #6
Green Broke
I do the samething as gssw5. My last addition is a 22 yr old gelding(Doc). I kept him in a pasture separated by a fence for two weeks then brought in one horse at a time for a couple days each. They each tried to bully Doc as they entered and each got double barreled each time they tried to push him. He did not go after them as he just wants to do his own thing without being bothered. Finally the lead mare came in and also tried it with the same result. They have been in the pasture together as a herd now for 6 weeks and they just now are getting to the point where the upper 3 do not push him except at feeding time while waiting for their turn to go in their stall. He does a quick spin to give them a view of his rump being loaded to deliver a kick which usually stops the aggression. Occasionally the lead mare with take a kick then try to deliver her own which sends them both running from each other throwing half bucks.

If you can separate her then do so as was stated earlier. It just makes things easier on her and the heard. It will eventually work out as is, but takes longer.
     
    08-14-2013, 12:46 PM
  #7
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Roadyy    
I do the samething as gssw5. My last addition is a 22 yr old gelding(Doc). I kept him in a pasture separated by a fence for two weeks then brought in one horse at a time for a couple days each. They each tried to bully Doc as they entered and each got double barreled each time they tried to push him. He did not go after them as he just wants to do his own thing without being bothered. Finally the lead mare came in and also tried it with the same result. They have been in the pasture together as a herd now for 6 weeks and they just now are getting to the point where the upper 3 do not push him except at feeding time while waiting for their turn to go in their stall. He does a quick spin to give them a view of his rump being loaded to deliver a kick which usually stops the aggression. Occasionally the lead mare with take a kick then try to deliver her own which sends them both running from each other throwing half bucks.

If you can separate her then do so as was stated earlier. It just makes things easier on her and the heard. It will eventually work out as is, but takes longer.
thanks ill try that. I feel bad she is so lonely all the time.
     
    08-14-2013, 01:41 PM
  #8
Yearling
It is sad to see your horse pushed out, but it should all work out in the end. I am going through this with my gelding. He was pastures with the herd boss and second in command for a week first, AMD they did fine. We put them all out together ( a herd of ten now), and the middle guy won't let my gelding anywhere near the herd. The yearling is starting (after two weeks) to leave the herd and graze with him, so I hope either they will buddy up and seperate herds or he will e entually be accepted into the large herd.
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