my 6 yr horse keeps throwing her butt at me when being groomed, how do i stop this?
 
 

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my 6 yr horse keeps throwing her butt at me when being groomed, how do i stop this?

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  • Making my horse stand while being groomed
  • Horse throws head while being groomed

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    02-17-2014, 11:44 PM
  #1
Foal
my 6 yr horse keeps throwing her butt at me when being groomed, how do i stop this?

I just got this 6 yr old paint mare. From what I understand her previous owner just had her and a stud in a pen and did not work with either much. I was told she is rideable but can be hard to catch. She is beautiful and I wanted to give her a chance since she was no longer wanted. My biggest problem is when I take her out of the pen to groom her she can get nervous and will all of a sudden throw her but toward me. She has not tried to actually kick but I having really gave her a chance to. At times she seems to like the attention but all of a sudden she will shift her butt and real quick throw it my way. I have to have my hand on her reins at all times or she gets this way. But that makes it hard to groom her correctly. How can I correct this behavior? She seems skittish at times so I have just been trying to gain her trust but I can't have her throwing her butt around Like that. I have 2 small children and would like for them to be around her at some point. Any suggestions would be great!
     
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    02-18-2014, 05:20 AM
  #2
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by tcangel3    
I just got this 6 yr old paint mare. From what I understand her previous owner just had her and a stud in a pen and did not work with either much.
I didn't read the rest after this and I do apologize, but those three words jumped out at me. She is most likely in foal now. Get a vet out, and see if she really is in foal. Others will be able to give you advice on getting her confidence up/ getting her to have manners.
Best of luck.
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    02-18-2014, 06:42 AM
  #3
Green Broke
I caught the stud/mare thing, too, but what got my attention is your hand is on her reins? Isn't she wearing a halter and a leadrope? She needs to learn patience & to stand & tie properly. I'm working w/my young mare on this right now, & she is coming around quickly. She will have to be very solid before you let your youngsters around her.
     
    02-18-2014, 06:47 AM
  #4
Trained
Hi tcangel, & thanks for pointing that out Candy - missed it entirely! I think I read 'at a stud in a pen'. Tcangel, if she's in foal, that is relevant to her behaviour, as well as to her - & the foal's - health & wellbeing. Sooner you find out, the sooner you can make plans... one way or another. What sort of horse is she? What is the stud? Does the old owner run a stud farm or...?

Honestly, it sounds like you're quite inexperienced & have taken on an uneducated & inexperienced horse. Therefore there is just way too much to go purely on theory - not to mention all our different opinions on forums to sort through - so if you want to keep the horse, I would strongly suggest you work with a good trainer, or experienced horseperson, for hands-on instruction.

Don't stop learning the theory(ies) either though. Understanding how horses think & the principles behind the training/actions is vital to developing a good strong leadership role.... having fun & staying safe. Learn about horse behaviour & bodylanguage, etc. Learn about the 'laws of learning', or behavioural training principles. A great little easy to read book on that is "Don't Shoot The Dog" by Karen Pryor(not a dog book )

For now, until you find a trainer, I'd probably just do stuff with her in the paddock or such, if she's nervous in a stable. Get to know her on easier grounds first, before you start testing the relationship with new & scary experiences. When a horse is frightened, they almost 'can't' think clearly & their whole focus is on self preservation, not the handler. It takes training & being *trusted* leader to calm the horse & get him listening again if 'overfaced'.

Oh & yes, hold onto the reins/lead & keep her head bent slightly towards you & 'listen' to her bodylanguage, be ready to correct & stay safe when she *starts thinking* about kicking or such. Once you develop an understanding with her & she learns that she mustn't 'fob you off' like that, of course, you shouldn't need to tie/restrain her just for handling. Sounds like it's for the best for now tho. I'd keep the kids at a safe distance until you've got a good thing going with her first too.
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    02-18-2014, 06:56 AM
  #5
Showing
Invest in a knotted rope halter for about $10. Google Warrick Schiller on youtube and look for how he gets a horse to pay attention to him when leading it. People with little experience are called green. Same with horses. Put them together and you get black and blue. Don't even think of this horse's past or it will cripple your thinking on how to handle her.
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    02-18-2014, 06:59 AM
  #6
Foal
Yes I thought the same thing when I was told they were together. I was told they grow up together and you can tell they are really attached. I asked if she had ever been pregnant and was told no. So I'm not sure why she has not been pregnant if they have grown up together in the same pasture. Thanks for all the great advice so far.
     
    02-18-2014, 07:09 AM
  #7
Foal
Cacowgirl pointed out I meant to say halter. Sorry about that I did not reread before I posted.
     
    02-18-2014, 09:17 AM
  #8
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by tcangel3    
Yes I thought the same thing when I was told they were together. I was told they grow up together and you can tell they are really attached. I asked if she had ever been pregnant and was told no. So I'm not sure why she has not been pregnant if they have grown up together in the same pasture. Thanks for all the great advice so far.

I don't know either... So I suspect that either A.) You have been lied to, and she has had many foals. B.) They just got lucky. But that doesn't mean she isn't in foal now, which is unlikely.
     
    02-18-2014, 09:22 AM
  #9
Weanling
I agree with loosie, great points as always.

Even if the previous owner claims she isn't pregnant, it would be good to have her checked by the vet to be certain. Some sellers may not know that the mare is pregnant (or be selling her because she's pregnant, and they don't want to deal with it).

Also like loosie said, I would just spend time gaining her trust and not asking anything of her. Just go out and spend some time with her, maybe sit nearby when she's eating and just be a pleasant presence. Then you can start working on her manners in regards to her turning around on you, but above all if youa ren't completely comfortable with her GET A TRAINER. While we all have our methods and ideas on here, there's nothing better than having someone there seeing her and showing you hands-on what to do.

Good luck with her!
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    02-19-2014, 12:50 PM
  #10
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by CandyCanes    
I don't know either... So I suspect that either A.) You have been lied to, and she has had many foals. B.) They just got lucky. But that doesn't mean she isn't in foal now, which is unlikely.
or C.) the Stud is a Gelding
     

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