Is my horse is to advanced for me? - Page 5 - The Horse Forum
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post #41 of 60 Old 03-30-2014, 04:49 PM
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Originally Posted by rydernation View Post
My take is that your horse is all the behaviors that you reinforce in some way. Yes, I was all over the place in this post, let me clarify! When you hit a horse for a bad behavior, you validate the behavior for the horse as a way to get attention. Some horses might find any attention, even punishing attention, rewarding. He gets attention, good or bad. A way to deal with this is to reward and praise to the skies good behaviors, even if you think it's silly. He's standing for grooming? Praise? He starts to walk off? Don't say anything just pull the halter and bring him back into position and say good boy, when he's standing again.

Some things obviously you're going to have to have a trainer to deal with. I rode at that barn where the BO would tell the girls riding his hotter than hot show jumper to hit him on the head with a crop when he reared. I don't know if that really worked, but those girls used the crop a lot. Obviously, I was happy that I only rode their well schooled OTTB cause he was an angel.

Thank you for clarifying.

I completely agree that some horses misbehave for attention and that the best thing to do is ignore the bad behavior/quietly correct and NOT make a fuss. However, I don't feel this is at all relevant in this thread, and the main behaviors the OP is concerned about take place under saddle. The horse is not trying to bolt home for attention..

Agree, anything dangerous needs to be dealt with by a professional!
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post #42 of 60 Old 03-30-2014, 04:50 PM
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Originally Posted by SlideStop View Post
If your hit is provoking or validating the horses behavior your not doing hard enough. I want my horse to think "****, I'll never do that again".
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Agree...for *most* situations.
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post #43 of 60 Old 04-02-2014, 05:26 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yogiwick View Post
Thank you for clarifying.

I completely agree that some horses misbehave for attention and that the best thing to do is ignore the bad behavior/quietly correct and NOT make a fuss. However, I don't feel this is at all relevant in this thread, and the main behaviors the OP is concerned about take place under saddle. The horse is not trying to bolt home for attention..

Agree, anything dangerous needs to be dealt with by a professional!

it has always been my understanding that horses just want to be left alone to do what they want, release is reward
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post #44 of 60 Old 04-02-2014, 09:27 PM
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My horse was too much for me to handle when I got him. I got a trainer, and we worked through my horse's issues. I wouldn't give up on her just yet...convince your parents to get you some help. It will be worth it.

Proud owner of Aurelius (PB Arab) and Oinky (Arab/Paint).
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post #45 of 60 Old 04-02-2014, 09:54 PM
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I went through this exact situation with my first horse. I bought her after hanging out with her for 5 or 6 hours. I never rode her, just knew she was the horse for me. (I know, I know..stupid!)

Anyways I had her for three months, and put her on craigslist. I knew that if I sold her, I wouldn't be getting another horse for a long time. A few hours later I took the ad down. It took almost 6 months for us to be able to work together, and be comfortable. I will have had her for a year in May, and now we are inseparable.

My advice is to work through it. I gave myself the rule that; if in a year we still weren't working together very well, I would sell her. So give her a year and continuously work on her, work on walk for a month. Then trot for a month. Then work on slowing her lope for a month. Work on ground work, get her to respect YOU. Take as much time as you need. If after a year you guys still aren't working out, then maybe look into things and consider if it is worth the time. I think if you take the time to work with her, and give it a year. Things will work out.

Don't get your mind set on selling her just yet. The only reason you should sell her is if she is a danger to you. If she is going to hurt you purposely, then yes maybe you should look into selling her. If she isn't trying to purposely hurt you, find a trainer and have them work with you two. Maybe go to her old owner and ask what her little quirks are. Maybe the way you are riding is telling her to GO. See what you can learn about her. Go sit in pasture for a few hours and observe her. Get to know her. It will benefit you both greatly.

Trust me it is worth it.

I won't be stopped. I can't be stopped.
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post #46 of 60 Old 04-03-2014, 12:28 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CrossCountry View Post
My advice is to work through it. I gave myself the rule that; if in a year we still weren't working together very well, I would sell her. So give her a year and continuously work on her, work on walk for a month. Then trot for a month. Then work on slowing her lope for a month. Work on ground work, get her to respect YOU. Take as much time as you need. If after a year you guys still aren't working out, then maybe look into things and consider if it is worth the time. I think if you take the time to work with her, and give it a year. Things will work out.
I really want to emphasize the TAKING YOUR TIME part. There's nothing wrong with working at only a walk for a while! Get her energy out through turn out or lunging, then walk until you're BOTH comfortable to trot. Then, work through the trot until it's always under control.

Never rush the process. It won't help either of you!

@CrossCountry, that was a very good response. I'm glad you and your horse are doing so well and grew together like that!

Yes, I am from one of those "fun barns".
"There are no bad horses, nor bad people. There are only broken spirits."
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post #47 of 60 Old 04-03-2014, 04:55 PM
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Originally Posted by jmike View Post
it has always been my understanding that horses just want to be left alone to do what they want, release is reward
I agree, and am not sure how that is relevant to what I said.
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post #48 of 60 Old 04-04-2014, 10:37 AM
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Originally Posted by Yogiwick View Post
I agree, and am not sure how that is relevant to what I said.
you said that some horses misbehave for attention

just thought that was odd --- i can see my kids doing that, but i had never thought to apply it to horses
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post #49 of 60 Old 04-04-2014, 04:02 PM
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Well I did not mean that as a general statement :)

Think of a horse pawing on the cross ties, or banging for their food, etc.

I don't think it counts under saddle at all or in many situations, but there are *some* situations where they definitely do "bad" things to try and get attention.

Or all the many horses that act like idiots in the paddock purely so they will a) be brought in or b) be given hay.

They have us trained pretty well!
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post #50 of 60 Old 04-04-2014, 04:41 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yogiwick View Post
Well I did not mean that as a general statement :)

Think of a horse pawing on the cross ties, or banging for their food, etc.

I don't think it counts under saddle at all or in many situations, but there are *some* situations where they definitely do "bad" things to try and get attention.

Or all the many horses that act like idiots in the paddock purely so they will a) be brought in or b) be given hay.

They have us trained pretty well!
I attribute this to "impatience"....and I totally tune the horse out when they do it. Do I label it bad behavior? Not really....not as in your "normal" or dangerous bad behaviors such as bucking, rearing, biting, running off and such. I call it their way of saying..."hey feed me first" because they can't speak after all.
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