Is my horse is to advanced for me? - Page 6 - The Horse Forum
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post #51 of 60 Old 04-04-2014, 05:24 PM
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Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Corner of 5th and insanity.
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In the search for a trainer (provided you keep the horse) specify that you need someone who is willing to teach you from the ground up. You shouldn't be in the saddle if you can't get some basic respect out of it. You're going to want to learn how to lunge and get the horse to respect your space by yielding its hind quarters, moving its shoulder away from you, backing up when you ask, and walking respectfully with you. If it doesn't do this already, or if you don't know how to do this already, you need a trainer that is willing to teach you and the horse. ASAP.

Riding and being around horses isn't JUST about time spent in the saddle, and technically, neither is being an experienced horse person. There is So. Much. More. to horses than being able to walk/trot/canter, especially as a horse owner. Basic first aid, spotting lameness, financials, knowing how to get ground respect and mounted respect, and being at least somewhat able to manage misbehavior are all keys in successful horse ownership. If you can't manage these things without another horse person guiding you, you are STILL a green rider, aka a newb, aka inexperienced. Honestly? I wish I had been able to call myself "experienced" after my first year of lessons. After two years I started riding greener horses, but I didn't have the faintest clue about ground control and only learned that the hard way (on the horse I SHOULD have bought.. after helping to break her in.)

You're still young and you're far from "experienced." If you're serious about this horse, seek lessons and a good, quality barn. If you're not serious or too frightened, sell it. It doesn't need to be in incapable hands and I don't say this to be mean.

But, understand something. You set your mind on finding a horse that was NOT dead broke and kid safe, as well as something that WOULD improve your riding/handling skills. That something fell in your lap, or otherwise there's good advice about being careful what you wish for. This is a good learning opportunity to take advantage of, even if it means getting a part time job and paying for lessons on your own.

-I haven't read the entire thread, but I'm sure this has all been mentioned before.

The path is different for you and me.. but the journey begins in the heart.

Last edited by NeryLibra; 04-04-2014 at 05:32 PM.
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post #52 of 60 Old 04-04-2014, 10:04 PM
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Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: New England
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GotaDunQH View Post
I attribute this to "impatience"....and I totally tune the horse out when they do it. Do I label it bad behavior? Not really....not as in your "normal" or dangerous bad behaviors such as bucking, rearing, biting, running off and such. I call it their way of saying..."hey feed me first" because they can't speak after all.
I guess it depends on your definition of "bad behavior". It may be acceptable to you, it is not to me. Is it dangerous or rude, no, but I feel if I ask a horse to stand quietly and they are being impatient...

The point is-
Yes they are trying to get my attention (for whatever reason), so I don't give it to them since I do not want to encourage the "inappropriate" (maybe better than "bad"? Lol) behavior.
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post #53 of 60 Old 04-04-2014, 10:30 PM
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Join Date: Apr 2013
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I think we may have scared OP off. I hope she managed to work something out with her parents to get lessons or some sort of help.

Tug on anything at all and you'll find it connected to everything else in the universe.~John Muir
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post #54 of 60 Old 04-07-2014, 03:47 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rydernation View Post
It suddenly occurred to me that you might be having issues with your parents as much as the horse. It's likely that you chose this horse, and promised he'd be the right one for you. It turned out he wasn't and you have to convince your parents to help you do something about it! I know in this situation my parents would have been angry and might have made me give up on horses altogether. Have you had any luck with them, yet?

Yep, your parents are angry with you and trying to prove a point but unfortunately, they are also risking your neck by letting you keep this horse.
I can't blame them for not wanting to pay for training. The cost of ownership plus training is a real financial burden. And, of course if you had bought a steady,quiet, fun horse you could handle, you wouldn't really need to add training.
Just look at it this way-to own a horse is roughly equivelant to going to the dealership and buying a really nice brand new car or truck. And, of course you never actually pay it off like you would a vehicle. Horses are purely a luxury item and we horse owners sacrifice a lot to own them in both time and money.
Since your parents are making the decisions, I assume you are under 18 and that means your parents truly own the horse. Until you reach 18 (in the US) you cannot own property or enter into a contract. They can actually sell the horse anytime they want. Be careful not to anger them, just approach the problem as maturely as you can
You may have to just sell the horse and go back to lessons (for a while) so that you can try to prove to them that you are responsible enough to own again. If you do get a chance to own a horse again, please take a trusted trainer with you for every single horse you look at. (Pay them for their time). Do not fall in love with the 1st one and do not buy for color.
Get a horse that meshes well with you and is trained to do everything you need so that no one has to take on the extra training expense.
Take everything a seller tells you with 'a grain of salt'.
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post #55 of 60 Old 04-16-2014, 07:06 PM
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Location: Charlottesville VA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GotaDunQH View Post
Huh???? I think you have things a little skewed for sure. Do I want his attention when I put forth a reprimand....well heck ya! Have you ever heard of the 3 second rule? I have used it and used it well, and whatever behavior that caused me to use the 3 second rule....was stopped. If you are going to reprimand....it needs to be swift and assertive and within the 3 seconds. The element of surprise and the fact that God has unleashed something unholy....means a lot to a horse and it's not the kind of attention they seek and they realize it within 3 seconds. I'm not talking about beating on a horse but getting your point across REAL quick. The element of surprise in those 3 seconds it was we call a "come to Jesus" moment. You get in...get out, and the horse is REAL sheepish at the end of it.
No, I don't have things skewed in the slightest. Some animals, like some people, act out as a way to get attention. Praising only good behaviors, and doing exactly as I said, getting the horse back where you want him and THEN, praising him again, works wonders. Of course, if you're the type that hits the rearing horse over the head with a crop, you'll NEVER get what I mean.
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post #56 of 60 Old 04-16-2014, 07:09 PM
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Location: Charlottesville VA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chasin Ponies View Post
Yep, your parents are angry with you and trying to prove a point but unfortunately, they are also risking your neck by letting you keep this horse.
I can't blame them for not wanting to pay for training. The cost of ownership plus training is a real financial burden. And, of course if you had bought a steady,quiet, fun horse you could handle, you wouldn't really need to add training.
Just look at it this way-to own a horse is roughly equivelant to going to the dealership and buying a really nice brand new car or truck. And, of course you never actually pay it off like you would a vehicle. Horses are purely a luxury item and we horse owners sacrifice a lot to own them in both time and money.
Since your parents are making the decisions, I assume you are under 18 and that means your parents truly own the horse. Until you reach 18 (in the US) you cannot own property or enter into a contract. They can actually sell the horse anytime they want. Be careful not to anger them, just approach the problem as maturely as you can
You may have to just sell the horse and go back to lessons (for a while) so that you can try to prove to them that you are responsible enough to own again. If you do get a chance to own a horse again, please take a trusted trainer with you for every single horse you look at. (Pay them for their time). Do not fall in love with the 1st one and do not buy for color.
Get a horse that meshes well with you and is trained to do everything you need so that no one has to take on the extra training expense.
Take everything a seller tells you with 'a grain of salt'.
I've never seen a car that was too much for any driver. Horses and cars are in no way similar. They are NOT machines, they do not run on gas, they are beings. You have to negotiate with them, read their body language, understand them, with a car you do none of these things!
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post #57 of 60 Old 04-16-2014, 07:11 PM
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Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Charlottesville VA
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Got thirty four hundred dollars? Get your horse three months of intensive hunter training at a professional stable.
Then if you still can't manage him, you have a horse you can sell or trade to anyone.
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post #58 of 60 Old 04-17-2014, 07:06 AM
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Join Date: Apr 2013
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Island Horselover View Post
First of all 1 year of riding is NOT a lot even if you would have ridden 6 different horses every day!

My understanding is that you 'test' rode that horse on a lunge line? And not without? Well, horses that are ridden while being lunged usually listen to the person on the ground - that is why beginners often start out with riding on the lunge line.

That horse does not sound to experienced or advanced for you it sounds like it has not been probably trained yet. My advice is either:

- sell the horse
- get a trainer

...
One year is NOT a lot, you ane nnot experienced, you will be a novice at the most

A beginner will practise until they can get it right but a professional will practise until they can't get it wrong
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post #59 of 60 Old 04-18-2014, 12:55 PM
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Join Date: Apr 2014
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I am going to speak from experience on this one. Years ago one of the students at our barn purchased a fantastic 3 yr old,however this horse was 3 and green broke. Did all her basics just needed time in the saddle. The girl was a very good rider but was intimidated because of how forward the little mare was. To keep a long story short it was not a good situation for her or the horse. She ended up with a broke arm and the horse ended up with a lot of bad habits. After the broke arm they gave her to the BO (was not purchased from him and he had advised against the initial purchase). I am not saying this to scare you. The horse ended up being absolutely fantastic! One of the best little horses I have ever rode. That being said the girl who had owned had her confidence shaken dramatically and literally quit riding for a few months even after her arm was healed. It took ages to get her over her fear. A dead broke horse can take you much farther than most people think. Confidence in the saddle can be easily shaken when just starting out. I would personally either sell her or trade with someone who has a dead broke horse but is looking for something with more spunk. Invest in a dead broke one. They are worth their weight in gold. Dead broke does not mean lazy by the way. It simply means they know what to do and how to handle a very many situations with a calm,cool head. There is a difference between dead broke and a dead head. I wish you the best of luck!
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post #60 of 60 Old 04-19-2014, 07:56 PM
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Location: New England
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rydernation View Post
I've never seen a car that was too much for any driver. Horses and cars are in no way similar. They are NOT machines, they do not run on gas, they are beings. You have to negotiate with them, read their body language, understand them, with a car you do none of these things!
I don't think that was what that statement was aiming towards...
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