Need help getting a horse
 
 

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Need help getting a horse

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  • Help gettingon horse

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  • 1 Post By Becca93

 
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    06-18-2013, 08:05 AM
  #1
Foal
Need help getting a horse

Hi, I'm getting a horse soon and I was wondering, if you could tell me what I will need, and a schedule of when stuff should be done and any advice in general would be much appreciated, I know the basics of caring for a horse, but I'm not sure on how often a horse should be groomed, and feeding schedules and that sort of stuff.

Hope you can help thanks.
     
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    06-18-2013, 08:27 AM
  #2
Weanling
This topic has been covered many times over before, so have a search in this section particularly.

Owning a horse isn't like owning a guinea pig or a dog.

This may seem harsh, and you will probably get all cranky and tell me I don't know what I"m talking about, but if you don't know what items you will need to purchase, scheudles for feeding, grooming and other basic things - then you should not buy a horse YET,

Go get lessons, lease a horse, work at a barn, volunteer for a pony club - get all that experience THEN buy a horse.

Another thread worth reading:

Thinking of getting your own horse?
EvilHorseOfDoom likes this.
     
    06-18-2013, 08:30 AM
  #3
Started
Hi Hannah, and welcome to the forum!

Firstly, will your horse be living on your property or someone else's? In a paddock or a stall? Which area (roughly) do you live in? What are your winters and/or summers like? This will help us determine what feeding schedules are needed. It will also depend on how easily your horse "keeps" I.e. How much feed it needs to keep a decent weight, and how much hard riding you're doing with it.

With my horse, if he was stalled (not ideal IMO, they get bored quickly in there), I take out in the morning, remove whatever rug he may have on, do a quick groom, exercise him, muck out his stall, put the feed and water in and put him back in. Then in the evening I go back, do a more thorough groom, ride, muck out, rug and feed before sending him to bed.

I've never had my own property but when my horse was living in someone else's paddock about an hour's drive away I was only able to get down there once a week. The property owner managed his feeds and rugging, so I would go down and groom, ride and groom again. That was sufficient for him to have a very glossy coat, because his diet was so good. He was being fed twice daily at first but he got VERY fat so ended up only getting a hard feed every second day. He had plenty of space to exercise himself (but the lazy bum chose not to! ).

Best of luck with your near-future acquisition!
     
    06-18-2013, 08:42 AM
  #4
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by EvilHorseOfDoom    
Hi Hannah, and welcome to the forum!

Firstly, will your horse be living on your property or someone else's? In a paddock or a stall? Which area (roughly) do you live in? What are your winters and/or summers like? This will help us determine what feeding schedules are needed. It will also depend on how easily your horse "keeps" I.e. How much feed it needs to keep a decent weight, and how much hard riding you're doing with it.

With my horse, if he was stalled (not ideal IMO, they get bored quickly in there), I take out in the morning, remove whatever rug he may have on, do a quick groom, exercise him, muck out his stall, put the feed and water in and put him back in. Then in the evening I go back, do a more thorough groom, ride, muck out, rug and feed before sending him to bed.

I've never had my own property but when my horse was living in someone else's paddock about an hour's drive away I was only able to get down there once a week. The property owner managed his feeds and rugging, so I would go down and groom, ride and groom again. That was sufficient for him to have a very glossy coat, because his diet was so good. He was being fed twice daily at first but he got VERY fat so ended up only getting a hard feed every second day. He had plenty of space to exercise himself (but the lazy bum chose not to! ).

Best of luck with your near-future acquisition!

Thanks for your response
The horse will be living on my property, I live in the south east of Britain so fairly cold winters and warmish summers, the amount of riding will be a fair amount mainly flatwork, hacks, jumping that sort of stuff
     
    06-24-2013, 05:39 PM
  #5
Foal
Try working at a ranch! I work at a ranch (as a volunteer) and it helped me learn what's involved with owning and caring for a horse as well as what you will need. First I'm required to muck stalls, which wasn't fun at first because you get filthy especially if it had recently rained... An horses poop a lot. So you have to be willing to clean their pen and stable often. After I muck stalls I then get to brush out a horse and saddle up for riding. I learned how to groom them and how to use all the grooming tools properly, and how to clean out their hooves. I also had to learn how to put all the neccicary tack on a horse before riding which is more complicated than it may seem unless you've owned horses before. There are certain sizes of saddles, blankets, halters, ect, needed to fit a horse, and you can't pick just any or else it will be uncomortable for the horse and for the rider. There's also a ton more involved with owning a horse. You have to have an adiquate food source and money to pay for it. I've still got a TON to learn about horses, but working at a ranch as a volunteer certainly helped me. And now I'm confidently getting my own horse in 3 months from now, and I know that if I need any help I always have people at the ranch to help me out if I need it. :)
But don't let anyone discourage you from getting a horse. They make you a better person who is more responcable and confident. If you're able to provide care and training for your horse, then it's likely you'll have a great horse. Do lots of research and go the extra mile to learn.
     
    06-24-2013, 10:46 PM
  #6
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hannah17    
Hi, I'm getting a horse soon and I was wondering, if you could tell me what I will need, and a schedule of when stuff should be done and any advice in general would be much appreciated, I know the basics of caring for a horse, but I'm not sure on how often a horse should be groomed, and feeding schedules and that sort of stuff.

Hope you can help thanks.

Hi Hannah, Welcome.

First off, every horse is different so what works for one, wont work for another.

I am by no means an expert, but I can tell you how I manage both my boys;
  • They are in a paddock 24/7 with a hay roll (one of them used to race and is a windsucker, so living in a paddock 24/7 with heaps of hay is better for him than bringing him into a stable).
  • Both get fed once a day (between 4 & 6pm) - with the amount of hay they get, they don't need any more than that. They get Oaten Chaff, Coprice P (a pellet which has added vitamins and minerals to it), Livamol - for their coats, Equimin (a suppliment to give them any additional vitamins and minerals that are lacking from the feed they get, due to the soils over here lacking in certain trace elements) and Slippery Elm (my ex racer has a sensitive stomach and the Slippery Elm coats his gut and stops him scouring. They also have access to a salt lick. I like to feed as simple as possible, whilst also feeding a well balanced diet. I don't believe in feeding suppliments just for the sake of adding suppliments. I only feed them if necessary.
  • Worming should be done as per instructions on the wormer. I worm every 3 months, as per instructions.
  • Teeth should be done (depending on the age of your horse) every year. Horses under 5 should be done twice a year and if your horse has dental problems - checkups should be as recommended by your dentist.
  • Feet should be done every 4-6 weeks as per recommendation by your farrier. I am a firm believer in only shoeing if necessary. One of my horses is unshod (not barefoot - the barefoot movement is something you may want to read up on if you are not familliar with it. It's really interesting reading) and my TB only has front shoes... he cannot cope with having no front shoes but his back feet are awesome.
  • Saddle fitting should be done as soon as you get a new saddle and then every 6-12 months after, depending on how much your horse changes shape. Your saddle should be fitted to both you and your horse to ensure the pair of you are comfortable.
  • My horses are washed (shampoo, conditioner, etc) before a show... that's it. Washing too often will strip the natural oils from their coats. They are rinsed off after trips to the beach and if they are sweating after a ride. If you don't plan on showing, wash them as needed.
  • I groom my boys before I ride. It's winter over here and both are clipped, so they are rugged and it doesn't take long to give them a quick once over. While grooming, I also check their bodies and legs for any swellings, scratches or heat. It allows me to know if something is wrong. Then I can assess whether to call the vet or not. I aslo give a quick brush or sponge off after I ride over their sweaty bits. Hooves are picked out before and after a ride.
  • My tack is cleaned thoroughly once a month. It is wiped over and the bit is cleaned after every ride.
My old boss - a pro rider manages his yard pretty much the same in regards to worming, teeth, feet etc.
  • Feeding is a bit different, he feeds twice a day -around 6am and between 5 & 6pm. Hay is fed morning and night at around the same time as the hard feeds.
  • Stables are cleaned out in the morning, ready for the horses to come in at night.
  • Horses are washed every 1-2 weeks, they are all rugged year round.
  • Horses are groomed before every ride (daily) and their feet are picked out before and after being ridden.
  • Horses are hosed off after every ride.
  • Tack is cleaned after every ride and bits are rinsed after every ride.
Any other questions, feel free to PM me.
     

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