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new - AQHA bloodlines?

This is a discussion on new - AQHA bloodlines? within the New to Horses forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category

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        08-21-2013, 10:49 PM
      #11
    Weanling
    My daughter is 16, and I have let her live thus far!!! Some days it is a toss up though!!!
         
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        08-21-2013, 10:51 PM
      #12
    Trained
    That was the way mine was......She is now delightful at 26. I lived through it-you will too.
         
        08-22-2013, 08:26 AM
      #13
    Yearling
    She seems built a little downhill (i think that is what it's called?)
         
        08-23-2013, 06:36 PM
      #14
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by jmike    
    that was very detailed --- I appreciate that a lot --- looking up omolene now --- switched from 10% all-stock to 10% horse and cattle ($1 more - but it has cracked grains in it instead of just pellets)
    I would HIGHLY recommend switching to something that is horse specific. Horses and cows don't have the same digestive system at all, and there's no such thing as a feed that is healthy for both. Grain (corn, barley, oats, etc.) really isn't very healthy for horses- they're very high in starch which horses don't digest well. Corn is the worst; I wouldn't feed anything that has corn anywhere on the ingredient label. Oats are "ok" as they're lower in starch, and the starch that they do have is more digestible than corn or barley, but they're still not great for them, and are unnecessary in most cases.

    A lot of horses do just fine on hay/pasture only with access to a salt lick and ration balancer or vitamin/mineral supplement. If they need a little something extra to keep weight on, there are a lot of good alfalfa- or beet pulp-based feeds out there. For the foal, you might consider a mare & foal formula.
         
        08-26-2013, 10:18 PM
      #15
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by verona1016    
    I would HIGHLY recommend switching to something that is horse specific. Horses and cows don't have the same digestive system at all, and there's no such thing as a feed that is healthy for both. Grain (corn, barley, oats, etc.) really isn't very healthy for horses- they're very high in starch which horses don't digest well. Corn is the worst; I wouldn't feed anything that has corn anywhere on the ingredient label. Oats are "ok" as they're lower in starch, and the starch that they do have is more digestible than corn or barley, but they're still not great for them, and are unnecessary in most cases.

    A lot of horses do just fine on hay/pasture only with access to a salt lick and ration balancer or vitamin/mineral supplement. If they need a little something extra to keep weight on, there are a lot of good alfalfa- or beet pulp-based feeds out there. For the foal, you might consider a mare & foal formula.
    they get the sweet feed twice a day --- 1 scoop each feeding and free range grass and hay

    I hadn't thought of the salt/mineral lick

    Might be good for the deer that visit the pasture as well --- thank you
         
        08-26-2013, 10:36 PM
      #16
    Yearling
    I just want to say I think it is amazing that you got a horse to share the experience with your family! They are so very lucky.

    Horses have always been something I have been able to share with my mom (even when she hasn't been riding) and while we are "horsing around" as we like to call it, we have always gotten along. Although we get along really well in general.

    I am now 23 and while we live about an hour away from each other, we still get together 3-5 times a week to ride. If it wasn't for horses we wouldn't see each other as much and it really is something I always look forward to.

    I hope this is the experience with you and your daughter as well! I know several father- daughter teams that rope and rodeo together etc and really seem to love it!
    jmike likes this.
         
        08-26-2013, 10:57 PM
      #17
    Showing
    I think if I were in your position, I would look to re-home the filly. She's got excellent bloodlines so you could market her as a ranch/cutting/sorting/working cow horse prospect and get a bit more money for her than just advertising her as an average filly.

    I'm telling you, bloodlines like that will bring money, even in this crappy market.

    Also, my experience with cutting bred horses like your filly, training them isn't for the faint of heart. They are quick and agile and energetic....and smart. Generally not the best combination for success when you don't have training experience. If you are truly interested in keeping the filly, I strongly suggest you involve a good trainer to help you with her. That way, you have the best chance of getting her broke enough to be safe with your kids, or the trainer will let you know if they don't believe she would be suitable for novice riders.


    As for feeding, I don't generally believe in feeding sweet feed to anything. All of mine get nothing but good quality grass hay and fresh grass when there is some. They also have free access to a mineral block and they all stay fat and slick and healthy. Oh, and make sure you get the mineral lick designed for horses. Some that are designed for cattle have ingredients that can make a horse very sick or even kill it.
         
        08-30-2013, 12:38 AM
      #18
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by smrobs    
    I think if I were in your position, I would look to re-home the filly. She's got excellent bloodlines so you could market her as a ranch/cutting/sorting/working cow horse prospect and get a bit more money for her than just advertising her as an average filly.

    I'm telling you, bloodlines like that will bring money, even in this crappy market.

    Also, my experience with cutting bred horses like your filly, training them isn't for the faint of heart. They are quick and agile and energetic....and smart. Generally not the best combination for success when you don't have training experience. If you are truly interested in keeping the filly, I strongly suggest you involve a good trainer to help you with her. That way, you have the best chance of getting her broke enough to be safe with your kids, or the trainer will let you know if they don't believe she would be suitable for novice riders.


    As for feeding, I don't generally believe in feeding sweet feed to anything. All of mine get nothing but good quality grass hay and fresh grass when there is some. They also have free access to a mineral block and they all stay fat and slick and healthy. Oh, and make sure you get the mineral lick designed for horses. Some that are designed for cattle have ingredients that can make a horse very sick or even kill it.
    good advice - thank you

    If was in it for a quick buck I would sell her in a heartbeat and probably make good money off of her, but I told the girl that I bought her from that I would take good care of her horses --- they will never go hungry or thirsty and they will always have space to roam.

    I can guarantee that I am not feint of heart - I am persistent and consistent - ask my wife :)

    I have a neighbor that has trained the most amazing horse and he will be helping me train her. She may never end up in a rodeo or a competition --- but she will be trained well enough to be safe with my kids -- if my neighbor can't help me get it right -- there is an AQHA certified trainer 20 miles away.


    I just recently put out a salt lick and mineral lick for the horses -- switched the filly to the dumas mare/foal feed --- and switched the other 2 horses to 12% pleasure horse feed.

    I hope I have their nutritional needs covered --- I am mostly concerned for the safety of my wife and children when they deal with the horses --- that filly is unpredictable.
    smrobs likes this.
         
        08-30-2013, 11:54 AM
      #19
    Green Broke
    That filly should be exposed to cattle and cutting training with those blood lines.

    I wish I was in a situation where I could take a horse.. that is a filly I would want.. if she looks like those blood lines say she should look!

    Get a trainer involved and get someone involved to give lessons to you all. A horse or horses for a family centric activity is great but you need to involve professionals.

    This is not for the feint of heart or the feint of finances.

    And I will say again.. get that filly looked at by someone who knows cutting horses. Seriously. She might have what it takes to go far.... those horses can even earn money (and where are the pictures?????)
    smrobs likes this.
         
        08-30-2013, 04:02 PM
      #20
    Yearling
    Will try to get some pictures up later today

    Was just out measuring them

    50 inches at the withers = 13 hands? At 17 months

    The mare that came with her is 64 inches ... so 16 hands?


    I have a neighbor that has been training horses for a long time and I am waiting for him to get back from Kansas to help me out

    Not sure if she will ever be a cutting horse or just a pleasure horse --- if we send her off to training -- there is a place near my work that trains cutting horses.
         

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