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Purchasing First Horse - Young or Old?

This is a discussion on Purchasing First Horse - Young or Old? within the New to Horses forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category

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        06-21-2014, 02:58 AM
      #11
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Mochachino    
    Oh my... I'm sorry but just reading what you wrote clearly shows how inexperienced you are, and I hope that someone will make a safe, sound and sane decision here or else I see this turning out very badly. The fact that you think that training a horse would be easy is shocking.

    You need a safe, older, been there done that horse. Whether it gets along with goats is not really part of the equation here...it's all about your safety.
    Again, I've never trained one so I wouldn't know how easy or hard it would be. For an experienced person it may seem like a no brainer but for some one like me who trains other animals I wouldn't really know because I don't usually work with large mammals.
         
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        06-21-2014, 08:19 AM
      #12
    Weanling
    I agree with the other comments so far that you are much wiser to go for an older and well trained horse to start with. I would avoid buying from an auction as well unless you have someone experienced that can come with you. Even then I would still try and find a horse elsewhere first.

    Having one horse for the whole family to ride may get frustrating, have you considered getting two? That way you can ride together and the horse gets company. Some horses might consider goats to be company but its still a poor substitute to another equine. Some horses can fall apart without any company of their own kind, so it would pay to find out whether any potential horses have ever been grazed alone and how they coped.

    Also a friend of mine had a horse that tolerated goats to the point where the goat would stand behind the horse and chew on its tail. I don't know why some goats do this but this horse had hardly any tail left. It didn't bother the owner much but looked odd and left the horse without a decent fly swatter over summer.
         
        06-21-2014, 05:28 PM
      #13
    Started
    I can tell you have a great head on your shoulders, because you are here asking questions.

    Option two or three are really the only options to consider. While you might be able to train a horse to get along with the goats, saddle training is a different matter. It would be a long while before you would be able to ride a young horse.

    A calm, well trained gelding would be your best bet. I have found that geldings are more receptive to pasture mates.

    Do you take lessons? If so, I suggest asking your instructor to help you horse shop. Finding the right one can be a daunting task!

    If you do not take lessons, I would recommend finding a good barn and getting some lessons under your belt before you buy your own horse.

    Good luck!
    Posted via Mobile Device
         
        06-22-2014, 06:40 PM
      #14
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by nikelodeon79    
    I can tell you have a great head on your shoulders, because you are here asking questions.

    Option two or three are really the only options to consider. While you might be able to train a horse to get along with the goats, saddle training is a different matter. It would be a long while before you would be able to ride a young horse.

    A calm, well trained gelding would be your best bet. I have found that geldings are more receptive to pasture mates.

    Do you take lessons? If so, I suggest asking your instructor to help you horse shop. Finding the right one can be a daunting task!

    If you do not take lessons, I would recommend finding a good barn and getting some lessons under your belt before you buy your own horse.

    Good luck!
    Posted via Mobile Device
    No lessons right now, would like to but I'm sure they're pricey... I used to go to a horse rescue and they'd give me some lessons, but other than that I've had only a few lessons. I'm considering working with the rescue again since they've been so helpful with me and my lack of knowledge, the issue being they're about 2 or 3 hours away. There's a city near us (half hour or so) that is known for having a bunch of horses since they're so close to the city yet have ample room, might try there, but locally it's mainly just farmers with horses they pasture raise or really, really expensive breeding ranches.

    I don't think we'll be purchasing one soon, it won't be for atleast a few months so we have plenty of time. I would prefer two horses, but I just don't know if we'll have the money for that many (we're looking to get some cattle as well since beef prices are going to go up soon). I like the idea of a rescue but many appear to be for experienced riders only, or aren't broke. There are some broke horses that people sell cheap or give away we see now and then but we're fairly wary about them, any tips on the best places to get horses?
         
        06-22-2014, 07:08 PM
      #15
    Weanling
    Hi, reading your OP made me shiver. Please, please, please explain to your family that buying the "young, wild horse" to raise and tame and be their loyal pet forever, is the worst idea ever. It actually might end up from your horse being just a pasture pet, to your horse seriously injuring you or a family member. Raising a colt into being your unique magic unicorn is suitable only for kids tales and experienced trainers.

    Look for an older horse, minimum 10 yo (more is better). Look for a horse who was a home-kept horse, a kids horse, known to be gentle and as bombproof as possible. You need a horse who had unexperienced owners and still behaved very well (so, the best would be a beloved family horse that is being sold due to financial reasons)

    Most horses, even if they look "perfect" when you see them with their (experienced) owners, learn soon bad habits from new owners who cannot correct them in time. And we're talking about well trained, well behaved horses.

    I don't have any advice about the goats; some horses love them, some just ignore them, some hate them. No way to know until you put them together, though a separate pen should be better, at least at the beginning.
    DraftyAiresMum and EliRose like this.
         
        06-22-2014, 11:10 PM
      #16
    Green Broke
    Something to point out here, is if you have limited experience with horses, not only do you need an older horse, but you are also going to need some good instructions on working with and handling horses.

    Horses will know if you don't have a clue and behave accordingly, so that the well broke and gentle horse, may turn in to a spoiled brat, if you don't handle it right.
         
        06-22-2014, 11:22 PM
      #17
    Foal
    As far as horses and goats, some horses are just STUPID about that! Honestly, there is no way to tell. We had horses with goats, with no problems. Then we sold the goats, sold a couple horses and got a couple different horses, got goats again after one of the new guys had been here about 2 years, and the horses did not like them at all. One even went plum through a barbed wire fence to get away from them even though the goats were in a separate pen from him, but nearby.
         
        06-23-2014, 12:28 AM
      #18
    Weanling
    SO glad to hear this!
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by falconrygal    
    Honestly that was pretty much what I've been thinking... A few people have told me this as well, so I wasn't sure when some one said it was the best way to keep a horse with goats. The initial plan was to get an older horse, but I started feeling pressured after my mom heard about the young horse thing and started saying that was the way to go.

    I completely agree with you on the part where I don't know how much I don't know, I've been to some seminars but usually I'm in the blind and don't know much of what they're talking about. We're hoping to do some mucking work in exchange for horse back riding lessons, I know some english riding but I'm still fairly fresh on western.

    Do you think it will still be alright to get a well broke horse even though we're fairly new to this, and if not how much training do you think I should go through before purchasing one?
         
        06-23-2014, 12:30 AM
      #19
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by falconrygal    
    No lessons right now, would like to but I'm sure they're pricey...
    Nothing compared to the cost of owning and properly caring for a horse.
         
        06-23-2014, 01:55 AM
      #20
    Weanling
    When looking for a horse three years ago, as a beginner, I was looking for something between the ages 9 and 12, already trained. By all means, the second option.
    Posted via Mobile Device
         

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