Requirements for a fence? - The Horse Forum
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post #1 of 11 Old 02-07-2014, 03:12 PM Thread Starter
Foal
 
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Requirements for a fence?

Hello,
I'm new to actually owning a horse of my own, but I've worked with horses a lot with my friends. Now I can actually get a horse, and I thought that my biggest problem might be finding a horse, but I've already found my sweet boy! Now I don't know what to do about the fencing. Does anyone have any ideas for fencing materials?
Thanks,
Michaela W
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post #2 of 11 Old 02-07-2014, 03:26 PM
Weanling
 
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hi! Welcome to the forum and to horse ownership! Congrats on finding your horse!

Building a fence depends on a lot of things, and we might need some more info to really help you.

What kind of area you are fencing, if you want electric or not, wood? PVC? What kind of a budget are you working on? How much space do you have to cover? Do you have materials already or are you starting from scratch?
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post #3 of 11 Old 02-09-2014, 11:33 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 17mwallingford View Post
Hello,
I'm new to actually owning a horse of my own, but I've worked with horses a lot with my friends. Now I can actually get a horse, and I thought that my biggest problem might be finding a horse, but I've already found my sweet boy! Now I don't know what to do about the fencing. Does anyone have any ideas for fencing materials?
Thanks,
Michaela W
Your budget will help determine part of the answer.
One thing you do want is something which is a true physical barrier. Whether it's wire fence, wood boards, vinyl "imitation wood" boards, cables, etc..... or a combination of things (e.g. wire and board, boards and cable, etc..) Something that will represent a true deterrent against them just running through it. If needed you can add something like electric fence as an additional deterrent, but never rely on it as your primary barrier, because they can blow through it in a second and then they're free to go where ever. Its also ok for dividing areas within your primary boundary since the primary boundary will still keep them contained if they violate the electric barrier.

They're always going to be bigger and stronger so you better always be smarter. (One of my grandfather's many pearls of wisdom)
its lbs not miles is offline  
post #4 of 11 Old 02-10-2014, 06:31 PM
Green Broke
 
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Put up the best fence you can afford and save yourself some heart ache.
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post #5 of 11 Old 02-10-2014, 08:13 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by its lbs not miles View Post
One thing you do want is something which is a true physical barrier. Whether it's wire fence, wood boards, vinyl "imitation wood" boards, cables, etc..... or a combination of things (e.g. wire and board, boards and cable, etc..) Something that will represent a true deterrent against them just running through it. If needed you can add something like electric fence as an additional deterrent, but never rely on it as your primary barrier, because they can blow through it in a second and then they're free to go where ever. Its also ok for dividing areas within your primary boundary since the primary boundary will still keep them contained if they violate the electric barrier.
What you need is totally dependent on your horses and how they respect a fence. All our horses were raised with electric and are contained by just one strand of electric polyrope, 3' high (2 strands where there are foals like in the picture) and they have never gone under, over, or through it. They'll graze to the edge, but just don't mess with it. It is inexpensive, quick to put up, and low maintenance.

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On the sixth day, God created the Quarter Horse.
On the seventh day, he Painted the good ones.
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post #6 of 11 Old 02-10-2014, 08:56 PM
Yearling
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PaintHorseMares View Post
What you need is totally dependent on your horses and how they respect a fence. All our horses were raised with electric and are contained by just one strand of electric polyrope, 3' high (2 strands where there are foals like in the picture) and they have never gone under, over, or through it. They'll graze to the edge, but just don't mess with it. It is inexpensive, quick to put up, and low maintenance.

You're just been successfully dodging a bullet .

We did the same thing with some pastured areas until an 8 year old QH who'd been contained with e-fencing since she was 6 months old spooked, panicked (we never knew what caused it) and we could see where she ran, brushed the fence so was obviously shocked, turned and from the tracks she ran through the fencing further in after it changed direction.

Then they there's always the cases that all the training in the world won't help, which we've also encountered at times (more often) such as when a deer takes out a section of e-fencing. Fortunately that was always done when it was just being used to divide a pasture so everything was still within the primary pasture and we didn't have to go find them.

I've contained animals with just a section of rope, but even though I've successfully done it at times I still wouldn't advise doing it for a permanent containment area. Experience as taught me that I prefer not to live on the edge and that the old saying "an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure" is very true.

They're always going to be bigger and stronger so you better always be smarter. (One of my grandfather's many pearls of wisdom)
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post #7 of 11 Old 02-10-2014, 09:12 PM
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you can use treated wood post , space about 8 to 10 feet apart, and put up some field fence or some no climb horse fence.
i like my fence to be at Lease 5 ft tall , exterior fences I like to be about 6 ft tall .
You staple the wire fence onto the post. You can also place boards across the top for a top rail . You can also use T post instead of wood, or used oil field pipe . I personally would not use just a hot wire as a perimeter fence. I like more substance and the wire fence helps to keep out stray dogs and coyotes. Good luck.
And you were given the best advice,, Put up the best fence you can afford .
You need to tape off the area you want fenced to figure out cost . Good luck.
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post #8 of 11 Old 02-12-2014, 07:29 AM
Green Broke
 
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I like electric fencing on pretty much every fence. It teaches the horse to keep away from fences, whether they be wood or wire or something else. So many horses get injured on fences, or damage them or rugs it's just good to keep them away. Beyond that it will be a matter of cost. Post and rail would be lovely, but it my country 90% of fences are star picket and wire... not the best but they do the job, the electric keeps the whole thing a little safer though.
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post #9 of 11 Old 02-12-2014, 09:57 AM
Green Broke
 
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We did some work on our front fence yesterday-replacing rotten posts, etc.-found a spot where something on the outside had almost completed digging in-took care of that, too. We will have to establish a routine for fence checking-our side fences were already here as per the neighbors, so we were lucky not having to invest much moneywise.
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post #10 of 11 Old 02-12-2014, 10:54 AM
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My number one choice is post and rail, with a strand of electric along the top. But lumber is costly, so my second choice is heavy gauge stock wire and electric (considerably cheaper). If you use stock wire, make sure it is strung taut with a fence puller or come-along, and if it is the deer and rabbit fence make sure it is the right way up, with the smaller squares at the bottom to prevent a horse putting a foot through it. A strand of electric along the top will stop them from leaning over it to graze and stretching it down. Good luck, and have fun with your new horse! Post pics when you can.
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