separation anxiety?
 
 

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separation anxiety?

This is a discussion on separation anxiety? within the New to Horses forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category

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    • 1 Post By Skyseternalangel

     
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        08-31-2013, 11:52 PM
      #1
    Yearling
    separation anxiety?

    So ... got 2 horses together -- a 6 year old mare and 17 month old filly

    The filly is always looking for the mare ... always

    I have been trying to work with the filly but she is always looking for the mare instead of keeping her focus on me

    I will walk her around on a lead and when we are walking aware from the mare once in a while she will stop and look over her should to find the mare --- and when we are walking towards the mare she will try to pick up the pace

    Not sure if this is an issue, or if I should ignore it.

    Thoughts? Ideas?

    ... side-note ... there is another 19 year old mare in the pasture with them and she is just now starting to feel safe around her --- the majority of the time she is grazing with her mare -- but just today I saw her grazing with the older mare (older mare is the dominant one)
         
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        09-01-2013, 12:01 AM
      #2
    Showing
    Just get her focused on you. If you ignore it then it'll become an even bigger issue.
    Oldhorselady likes this.
         
        09-01-2013, 12:50 AM
      #3
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Skyseternalangel    
    Just get her focused on you. If you ignore it then it'll become an even bigger issue.
    thanks -- I will try to keep her focused on me --- not sure how though

    She is still challenging my authority/dominance
         
        09-01-2013, 01:10 AM
      #4
    Showing
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by jmike    
    thanks -- I will try to keep her focused on me --- not sure how though

    She is still challenging my authority/dominance
    Horses at that age are looking for their place in the herd. They can push boundaries, they can rebel since this whole "human being herd leader" concept is newer to them, and they also can soak up things like a sponge.

    So if she looks around, circle her on lead, ask her to yield her butt over, back her up a step or two, trot with her on lead (if you're comfortable running along side her) until you have her full attention again.

    Since she's younger, there are less options to correct since joints haven't fused yet but those options are low-impact and work on capturing her attention.

    Also try not to think of it as your authority/dominance. Think of yourself more as a mentor. A mentor that corrects when she steps out of line, that encourages and supports her through learning how to become a mount, and a mentor that is also protective of her and will let no "boogy monsters" get to her. Your role is to become her leader. Help her succeed by keeping her attention.
         
        09-01-2013, 02:00 AM
      #5
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Skyseternalangel    
    Horses at that age are looking for their place in the herd. They can push boundaries, they can rebel since this whole "human being herd leader" concept is newer to them, and they also can soak up things like a sponge.

    So if she looks around, circle her on lead, ask her to yield her butt over, back her up a step or two, trot with her on lead (if you're comfortable running along side her) until you have her full attention again.

    Since she's younger, there are less options to correct since joints haven't fused yet but those options are low-impact and work on capturing her attention.

    Also try not to think of it as your authority/dominance. Think of yourself more as a mentor. A mentor that corrects when she steps out of line, that encourages and supports her through learning how to become a mount, and a mentor that is also protective of her and will let no "boogy monsters" get to her. Your role is to become her leader. Help her succeed by keeping her attention.
    something I will have to correct in myself --- mentoring versus authority/dominance -- I can do that

    Definitely want to work on yielding her hind quarters -- but she is good about walking back and forth and not really fond of trotting
         
        09-01-2013, 04:23 AM
      #6
    Yearling
    Hey OP, This is not uncommon for young horses to spend the first few minutes of each training session looking around, and especially looking for their buddies.
    I have a 3 yr old stallion, and a 5 yr old gelding, who look for each other all the time. The 5yr old gelding will run around the fields when I take the stallion out to go for work or grazing or anything, and the stallion runs around and screams for a while when I take the gelding out... then after 5-10 minutes they calm down...

    The gelding never pays attention to where the stallion is when the gelding is worked, I can ride, lunge or just walk near the fence where the stallion is calling for him, or running around, he wont even move an ear.
    The stallion on the lunge occasionally tries to pull me closes to the gelding, but gets immediatelly corrected, set in to work, when he settles and works nice he has dones his job well and goes back to the fields after some extra grass grazing :P

    To correct a horse pulling towards another horse, or trying to run over you to get to the other one, is working with a lunge line and a whip, when the horse is focused on you and listens to stopping and resting together, it is allowed to, but if it stops to check for buddies, then it gets to work... OK, you won't lunge a 16 month filly too much, but even then ground manners and her will to focus on you have to be established, and that can even be done in a leadline.. With such a young horse you can back them and as said before by others, yield her hind to get her to think about you, and they don't enjoy backing much, so she will associate when you are asking something she doesnt like, and hopefully pay more attention..
    Some suggest that when the horse is not paying attention you have to do things faster and louder, to get them to react faster and remember that they have to look at you.....
         

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