should i buy a 4yo TB? - Page 2
 
 

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should i buy a 4yo TB?

This is a discussion on should i buy a 4yo TB? within the New to Horses forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category

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        06-19-2014, 07:59 AM
      #11
    Started
    Firstly, she said TB guys not OTTB.

    If you have reservations about it, it's likely not a good idea. While you have the assistance of your Aunt (which is a huge plus!) there may be issues that arise when she is not there to help you. Also, a young horse can be quick to learn who is boss - your Aunt may put the horse in his place but you may not and this could create more problems.

    Go with your gut feeling - it's normally right.
    Yogiwick likes this.
         
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        06-19-2014, 09:28 AM
      #12
    Started
    A four year old is very young, and very green. Just because Thoroughbreds are frequently started young in racing doesn't mean that they have the mental capacity to make a good all-round riding horse at that age.

    Likely a 4yo TB would be too green, too unpredictable, and therefore too dangerous for a relatively young horse owner to take on. Whilst I am sure your aunt's help would be valuable she would need to be with you ALL THE TIME to make things safely possible.

    Now, you don't want a horse that you can work with only when you aunt is there do you?!

    I say keep looking. Decide what you DO want rather than looking at everything and falling in love with the most unsuitable ones (we all do it ).

    Set yourself a minimum age (I suggest 8 or 10 depending on your abilities), height, and training/abilities then ONLY look at those ads.
         
        06-19-2014, 10:04 AM
      #13
    Showing
    I started riding at 6, not often, just enough to remain hooked. At age 9 a birthday gift was 10 lessons. There is a span of time in which we have no fear of horses or think about possible consequence. I was game to get on any horse. And I learned the hard way, literally. By 15 I'd developed my skills on my own, with the odd lesson, maybe two a year, because I had learned I had to outsmart the horse and the ground hadn't gotten any softer.I was also riding ottbs just weeks off the track as 2 yr olds and loved that they were forward thinking. Part of my learning was always watching the best riders at horse shows. A few times I was invited to try out well trained horses which taught me a lot. I'm so glad I didn't listen to naysayers. When I got my first job at 19 and my first horse, he was an ottb that had been off the track a few years and he was game to try anything I asked of him.
         
        06-19-2014, 10:08 AM
      #14
    Weanling
    If you have to ask...then probably not.
         
        06-19-2014, 10:08 AM
      #15
    Yearling
    A 4 year old horse doesn't have the experience or training of a older horse. He just can't because of his age.
    Would I say "No, absolutely not!"
    NO, I won't.

    Some horses have the disposition at a young age of a older, seasoned horse...your issue though is he is not well-trained yet.
    Honestly, few human 15 year olds have enough experience under their belt to handle and train a horse, even with occasional help of your Aunt.
    If you said he was going into a boarding & training barn where you will ride him in lessons, he will be ridden and worked by your trainer and instructor,,, then I would be more apt to say be very careful and make sure you ride him several times & your trainer should be with you to observe and ride the horse themself before purchasing. {And that "cheap" young horse should still have a PPE done to make sure he is healthy and not having any hidden issues......}

    You mentioned none of that so...just because of your "green-ness" and the horses "green-ness" I will say "No, not in either of your best interest."

    Do look for a horse, but a older horse who is well-trained and more settled and set in his/her ways. One that can teach you...and if they are trained they will teach you.

    Bad habits take not long to form, teaching riding cues and manuevers without having a solid foundation yourself... well, undoing your errors is much harder than just doing it right from the beginning.
    Take the time to search for a older horse... they come bigger in size too.
    And they come affordable...look around. Ask around and don't go looking with rosy glasses on of "my new horse" but with "what can he teach me, is he safe for me to ride, can I enjoy him, and can I ride him alone without always having to have supervision". You don't want to teach him something wrong or let him get away with something that further along in his education will hurt you both moving on to more difficult activities...

    This horse....No.
    A older seasoned horse...Yes.
    Parents permission, consent and blessing since they have to pay for his upkeep...
    ABSOLUTELY MANDATORY!!!

    Midnite711 likes this.
         
        06-24-2014, 08:00 PM
      #16
    Foal
    I would say maybe not. Only because of safety. I don't think you'll ruin this horse. BUT I do think you could get seriously hurt. If he was to be boarded at a barn and worked with by a trainer then maybe, but just having your aunty out once a week won't do much. You might think he is perfect now, but just wait the horse that is perfect for YOU is waiting just around the corner! Hope all ends up well!
         
        06-24-2014, 08:55 PM
      #17
    Green Broke
    My first statement is age (your age, not the horse's) really doesn't have much to do with anything... Especially at 15. There are 15 year olds who are perfectly capable of training a horse, and have done so successfully. That said, those 15 year olds have been riding for their wholes lives.

    So, based on the little information given, I would say this probably isn't the horse for you, based on its age alone.

    What are you planning to do with this horse? What discipline are you looking to do? As someone else on the previous page asked, what makes this horse more appealing than others you have looked at? What kind of experience do you have?
    These are all things you need to consider.
         
        06-25-2014, 04:31 AM
      #18
    Foal
    I would suggest finding a horse that is ready to go in lieu of a 4 year old TB. Speaking from experience with OTTBs and TBs, it's a huge time investment. We had a 4 year old in our barn last week that freaked being tied, slipped out of her halter, fell on her back from rearing, and then proceeded to conduct a galloping tour of the farm.

    Would you be happier with an older TB already started?

    I admire your hutzpah, though. If this is something you truly, truly want, just make sure you have the time, effort, and energy to put into it. (Oh my god I just heard my mom in my head)
    IquitosARG10, boots and Dustbunny like this.
         
        06-26-2014, 09:34 PM
      #19
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by diggerandkelsey    
    i am only 15 and im looking for a bigger horse, i've been looking online for awhile and have recently come across a 4yo TB gelding.

    I don't have much experience with young horses. He is already broken in and in light work, but if I did buy him I would get someone out to do some natural horsemanship and further his education.

    Mu aunty also has done alot of work with younger horse and would help me out, but I just don't know if its a good idea; or if people will give me hate and say I don't know what im doing or that im going to ruin the horse. I just need a bit of advice or re-directing in what to do.

    Thanks kelsey
    Kelsey - is this an OTTB? If so, he will need some down time (if he's not had it already) in which you can spend time doing A LOT of groundwork. If you have the confidence that you can do it I think you shouldn't hold back...on the other hand, they can be very unpredictable and green, like most everyone else has said.

    If you go through with it I think it is IMPERATIVE that you work with a trainer for groundwork AND when you begin training.

    Only you yourself will know if this is something you can handle or not. If you are in no rush and just want to be a sponge on learning how to bring along a younger horse, then I think you should indulge in the opportunity. However, if you have doubts regarding your ability or think you lack the experience, or don't have the support system, then I don't think this is the horse for you.

    I think it's worth going out to have a look - regardless of the stereotype of TBs, there are many that are as mellow as they come (I am lucky enough to have one of those! )

    Keep us all posted, and good luck!
         
        06-26-2014, 10:09 PM
      #20
    Super Moderator
    There are some really laid back TB's and I've always found them to be less spooky and better able to deal with life than a lot of other breeds but I don't think taking on a green 4 year old when you say you don't have a lot of experience is such a good idea because some of them are super smart and soon realize they're with a less confident person and will take advantage if they get the chance.
    There are lots of taller QH's around that are already well trained that might be a better step to moving on to a bigger horse
         

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