So much information..
 
 

       The Horse Forum > Keeping and Caring for Horses > New to Horses

So much information..

This is a discussion on So much information.. within the New to Horses forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category

    Like Tree2Likes
    • 1 Post By loosie
    • 1 Post By its lbs not miles

     
    LinkBack Thread Tools
        09-01-2013, 03:02 PM
      #1
    Foal
    So much information..

    There's so much information about horses that I can learn.
    But I have no idea what to begin with.
    So, this is why I need you guys' help.
    If you have any information that you feel like anyone should know, or articles that are really helpful for beginners, or even videos and such, do you mind sharing them?
         
    Sponsored Links
    Advertisement
     
        09-01-2013, 05:19 PM
      #2
    Trained
    There is so much information out there, but do be aware that a lot of it is still outdated, even on the net. Are you looking at getting a horse? If so I'd first start on learning about management, diet, hoof care, etc.
    its lbs not miles likes this.
         
        09-01-2013, 05:55 PM
      #3
    Green Broke
    I think the best way to learn about horses is to deal with them hands on. Is there a place nearby that you can begin to take lessons under a knowledgeable instructor?
         
        09-01-2013, 06:07 PM
      #4
    Started
    Hands on is always a plus.
    I think you should look into groundwork, teaching your horse respect, and making sure the horse can and will listnanto you on the ground. If the horse isn't listening to you on the ground, chances are that he won't listen with you on him either.
    The horse should trust you and respect you. He should trust you with everything you do around him and he should let you do anything around him.
    A few days ago I was getting ready to get on m horse bareback. There was some people around and they were watching me. After I got off him for the day, those people came up to me and told me that they were shocked that my horse continued to eat and didn't pay any attention to me when I went from a running jump to get on his back. My horses didn't flick an ear and he usually doesn't when I do anything around him - new or old.
    Your horse should be comfortable with everything you do around him.
    You horse should also be willing and will do anything you ask of him - ground or mounted, he should do what you ask.
    Some days I know Brisco just doesn't feel like loping - so when I ask him to he may hesitate, but after a few more cues and asking he will get to a lope.

    Just a few things to look into when you work with your horse ;)
         
        09-01-2013, 06:11 PM
      #5
    Yearling
    Ditto to what loosie said.

    Feed/nutrition and feet are what I'd consider most important. While a horse can get by on relatively poor nutritional balance (if not there wouldn't be many people with horses ) they'll do a lot better with it. (and don't believe what every feed maker says.....research the information....several colleges/universities provide a wealth of information)
    You'll find that the most common and often life ending items for horses have to do with their digestion and their feet (and the feed can effect the feet). Many things that people still believe today is centuries old erroneous information. Many things that people are finding out (and often think are "new") are also centuries old, but didn't come out of Europe so it wasn't seen as being what's best. Much of what is believed is the result of keeping horses in cities (for a long time there were huge numbers of horses maintained in cities for transporting goods and people around town). People were less concerned about the well being of the animal and more concerned about the labor they provide (also they were relatively cheap and easy to replace), but what they believed then is still carried on today.
    While people in general do want to treat their horses better a great many still tend to rely on what was continuously passed down from those times.

    Many good, well meaning people will tell you things that they believe, because it's what they were told, but not because it's right. E.g. Our vet during my youth told us for years that we needed to shoe our horses and especially my white mare with her white feet (there's an old belief that a black hoof is harder and a white hoof is soft..... it's not true ). It took 6 years before he acknowledge that my extended family, with our unshod horses , had the best feet in the county (and was shocked when he found out that they were ridden on the hwy almost daily).

    Proper management is critical, because without a healthy, sound horse the rest won't really matter.
    The next thing after management will be the equipment that you use. Mainly the saddle. Make sure you get one that fits properly (and ideally displaces the most weight if you're not restricted to a certain type of saddle). A sore back can ruin your day and sure isn't much fun for your horse.
    loosie likes this.
         
        09-02-2013, 05:09 AM
      #6
    Foal
    Thanks guys! That's very helpful.
    And yes I might get a horse in the future but now I'm just a beginner, started taking lessons, so I don't want to feel like a complete noob when I enter the stall and look at the horses, and understand nothing of what they do. XD
         
        09-02-2013, 05:21 AM
      #7
    Showing
    Basics Needs:

    Space to run around
    Exercise
    Companionship (for happiness)
    Clean water
    Good quality Hay
    Salt and other vitamins as needed

    Developmental needs:

    Respect for handler
    Picking up feet/grooming
    Loading into trailer
    Being tacked up
    Worked on by vet/farrier

    Health needs:

    Yearly shots
    Worming regularly (I usually get fecal done but barn sometimes does every X months)
    If you have a gelding, sheath to be cleaned and for mares, utters cleaned
    Teeth done every 8-12 months depending
    Feet trimmed 4-6 weeks depending
    Coggins and other bloodwork to check for selenium levels

    Then it goes into more intricate things like basics of being ridden, yielding to pressure, desensitizing, groundwork, etc. And also minor care of wounds, correcting bad habits, praising good attempts, etc.

    Hope that helps.
         
        09-02-2013, 11:07 AM
      #8
    Weanling
    The what's to learn have been covered, , now what remains is who to learn from. Books and videos can give you the vocabulary and a basic understanding of what is going on, but having a mentor to help you apply the lessons is invaluable. I lucked out by having some great buckaroos and trainers to learn from. I hope that you can find people just as skilled and willing to teach. Good luck.
    Posted via Mobile Device
         
        09-02-2013, 12:47 PM
      #9
    Super Moderator
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by amberly    
    Hands on is always a plus.
    I think you should look into groundwork, teaching your horse respect, and making sure the horse can and will listnanto you on the ground. If the horse isn't listening to you on the ground, chances are that he won't listen with you on him either.
    The horse should trust you and respect you. He should trust you with everything you do around him and he should let you do anything around him.
    A few days ago I was getting ready to get on m horse bareback. There was some people around and they were watching me. After I got off him for the day, those people came up to me and told me that they were shocked that my horse continued to eat and didn't pay any attention to me when I went from a running jump to get on his back. My horses didn't flick an ear and he usually doesn't when I do anything around him - new or old.
    Your horse should be comfortable with everything you do around him.
    You horse should also be willing and will do anything you ask of him - ground or mounted, he should do what you ask.
    Some days I know Brisco just doesn't feel like loping - so when I ask him to he may hesitate, but after a few more cues and asking he will get to a lope.

    Just a few things to look into when you work with your horse ;)

    I think it is a mistake to tell someone who admits to being a rank beginner to start off with all kinds of groundwork and looking to have the horse do anything you ask and let you do anything you want around him. While this is all true, yes, you do want to learn how to work with a hrose on the ground , if you are a beginner, do not try to do all this stuff on your own. It's not like following a manual or plugging in an appliance.
    Done poorly, groundwork actually confuses, dulls or irritates your horse and makes for a poorer relationship.

    Ok, basic reading: I loved Sally Swifts "Centered Riding".
    I know there are books about basic handling of horses, for manners, too, but don't know which to recommend.

    REally, what you need to do is get hooked into a good trainer, even if it's just a friend who has maybe 5 years + of experience. That's not a lot, but they can get you started, and then you just keep looking to the person who has more experience than yourself, and eventually, you'll be helping along a junior person!
         

    Thread Tools

    Similar Threads
    Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
    Need Information! Breezy2011 Horse Colors and Genetics 9 07-03-2013 04:07 PM
    Looking for information! Rodeo1998 Horse Breeds 2 02-09-2013 04:28 AM
    Just looking for some information Oxer Hoof Care 16 02-07-2012 10:59 AM
    Need Information!!!! wannahorse22 Horse Breeds 40 02-22-2010 02:34 PM



    All times are GMT -4. The time now is 04:00 AM.


    Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
    Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
    Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0