speed and cues?
   

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speed and cues?

This is a discussion on speed and cues? within the New to Horses forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category

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        10-01-2013, 10:31 AM
      #1
    Yearling
    speed and cues?

    What are the different speeds and the different cues for those speeds?

    I can cue for walk and gallop, but not sure what the cues *should be for the other speeds.

    I am assuming that the other speeds are trot and canter - but am not 100% sure
         
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        10-01-2013, 11:19 AM
      #2
    Showing
    It depends completely on how the horse was trained. Some horses only know walk and gallop.

    For me, the way I train my horses:

    Walk = slight squeeze with both legs equally

    Trot = slight bump with both legs equally

    Lope (canter) = slight squeeze with both legs, inside leg being more forward closer to the cinch, outside leg giving a little more pressure farther back to cue for correct lead

    Gallop = forward seat or modified '2-point' position, moderate bumping with both legs and, if they need more encouragement, I'll also smooch to them.

    Stop = sit deep and pick up the reins just enough to remove some of the slack, though sitting is enough on most my horses.

    At no point do I ever "kick" and a horse that's trained properly should pick up the gait you ask for without you having to slow them down via the reins.


    Unfortunately, there are way too many horses that are trained like this
    Kick = go forward
    Kick more = go faster
    Head yank = slow down and maybe eventually stop.
    jmike likes this.
         
        10-01-2013, 11:46 AM
      #3
    Yearling
    Thanks smrobs -- that's a good breakdown and was exactly what I was looking for -- I am completely ignorant of leg cues and I would really like to learn them so I can phase them in to replace the audible cues

    From what I see of this horse (and keep in mind I am an ignorant beginner) -

    2 smooch's = walk
    3 fast smooch's = go faster (or go up a gear)
    4 fast smooch's = go much faster (or go up 2 gears)

    Easy bump on the bit makes her drop all the way down into a walk (would like to find a way to make her drop a gear instead of dropping all the way down to a walk)

    2 easy bumps on the bit makes her walk a step or 2 backwards (recently learned and still working on it)
         
        10-01-2013, 12:16 PM
      #4
    Green Broke
    ALL horses can be ridden collected, working and extended in every gait. Consider the gallop a 4th "gear" for the canter.
    I believe that you need some lessons to feel and be able to distinguish between, recognize and perform the cues you give in rein, leg and weight to get a horse to perform all of these. Many horses are never trained to listen, either, so you probably need a trainer, too.
    jmike likes this.
         
        10-01-2013, 12:35 PM
      #5
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Corporal    
    ALL horses can be ridden collected, working and extended in every gait. Consider the gallop a 4th "gear" for the canter.
    I believe that you need some lessons to feel and be able to distinguish between, recognize and perform the cues you give in rein, leg and weight to get a horse to perform all of these. Many horses are never trained to listen, either, so you probably need a trainer, too.
    Thanks Corporal

    I do need lessons -- but just don't have that option at the moment

    From what I have seen, she has a walk, a trot, a slow canter, a fast canter, and a gallop -- I am comfortable sitting in the walk, trot, and slow canter -- the fast canter is when I start losing a little of my balance and I am definitely not ready for a gallop


    Not real sure what you mean by "ALL horses can be ridden collected, working and extended in every gait." --- my initial thoughts are the length of the strides --- collected being slower and shorter than working, and working being slower and shorter than extended --- 3 gears for each gait?


    Also not sure what you mean by "Many horses are never trained to listen"
         
        10-01-2013, 12:42 PM
      #6
    Green Broke
    "Listening" means your horse is light and obedient to your aids. It is horse-speak, like the term "over-faced."
    Buy and read this, since you cannot afford lessons.
    Http://www.amazon.com/Complete-Training-Horse-Rider-Podhajsky/dp/0879802359/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1375219035&sr=1-1&keywords=the+complete+training+of+horse+and+rider
         
        10-01-2013, 01:14 PM
      #7
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Corporal    
    "Listening" means your horse is light and obedient to your aids. It is horse-speak, like the term "over-faced."
    Buy and read this, since you cannot afford lessons.
    Complete Training of Horse and Rider: Alois Podhajsky: 9780879802356: Amazon.com: Books
    she definitely listens more since I started doing groudwork with her, and I try to use as little pressure as I can to get her to do what I want. (except when she was charging into my space)


    Thank you for the reading material
         
        10-01-2013, 01:15 PM
      #8
    Green Broke
    My horse is trained to walk at "Walk on", trot at a cluck, and canter at a kiss. It's always interesting to ride different horses and see different cues. Subbing~
    jmike likes this.
         
        10-01-2013, 01:19 PM
      #9
    Green Broke
    I try to train my horses to eventually listen to JUST my silent body cues. I believe that smooches and kisses and clucks are okay for ground training, but are not precise enough horse vocabulary with any nuance for a finished horse.
    jmike likes this.
         
        10-01-2013, 01:28 PM
      #10
    Green Broke
    ^I don't think there's anything wrong with verbal cues to go along with physical ones. In many cases it's really just a matter of classical conditioning.
         

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