Thinking of getting your own horse? - Page 3
 
 

       The Horse Forum > Keeping and Caring for Horses > New to Horses

Thinking of getting your own horse?

This is a discussion on Thinking of getting your own horse? within the New to Horses forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category

    Like Tree256Likes

     
    LinkBack Thread Tools
        05-25-2013, 03:19 PM
      #21
    Teen Forum Moderator
    For your first horse, you need to know it's health record, training backround, etc as far back as possible. Their health record is an indicative of what you can expect later on.

    Calculate what the cost of upkeep should be for your horse, then add another $200 per month to it to allow for vets, chiropractors, fittings, massages, more expensive farrier care, etc. Most horses will need at least one of these at some point in their lives. Just because your new horse seems like it will be an easy keeper now doesn't mean it will be later. Things happen.

    Have at least a $500 emergency fund, preferably $1000. Horses are accident prone, and if they can hurt them on something they will!

    PAY FOR LESSONS FOR BOTH YOU AND YOUR NEW HORSE. It doesn't matter if you've been riding for 1 year or 20, if your horse is a school master or just a trail horse. Your experience will be SO much better if you have at least a few months of help while you and your new horse learn to work with each other.
         
    Sponsored Links
    Advertisement
     
        05-25-2013, 04:11 PM
      #22
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Tessa7707    
    Amen. Do the math. Calculate what it will cost in a year, divide that by 12, and make sure you can afford that much. Better yet, set aside the much for a few months before you get a horse A) to be absolutely sure you can afford it & B) so that if anything happens to your income, you can still afford to feed your horse while you are looking for a new home for it. Here's a sample breakdown for prices in my neck of the woods:

    Yearly Vaccinations: $100
    Farrier: $45 every 8 weeks. Barefoot trim, add accordingly for horses that need shoes. $270 yearly
    Wormer: varies as you rotate wormer, say an average of $10 every 3 months: $40 yearly
    Board: self care board for me is $135 a month, $1620 yearly
    Feed: $100 month, $1200 yearly

    So, baseline, you're talking $3230 a year, or about $270 a month. Baseline.
    That's not to mention unexpected vet costs for injuries, colic or other crazy things yu'll be responsible for. My BO just spent $1400 in vet bills because his mare got bit by a tick. Teeth floating is usually a couple hundred dollars.

    I think I mentioned this before, but leasing is a wonderful step to take before horse ownership. You get the perks of ownership without as much of the responsibility like unexpected vet costs
    Here's a huge pet peeve of mine.

    Always get an estimate of costs in YOUR AREA not what people put up on the internet. The costs of basic care expenses vary greatly from region to region. Board can vary from 100/month to 1000+/month across the map. The cheapest vet/farrier/boarding barn etc may not always be the best quality and can really screw you over out of a lot of money when something goes wrong. Plan accordingly to your own individual horse as each horse's care needs will differ.

    The horse industry is all about word of mouth. Surround yourself with knowledgable folk and read reviews about the services in your area.

    Do take a trainer with you who is brutally honest and reputable. Some trainers will deliberately coax a rider into buying a horse that is a terrible match for them in order to make money off the training.

    Don't buy cheap tack but don't think that the most expensive tack is always appropriate either. Do your research get opinions and reviews and remember that it is what fits BOTH you and your horse well. Just because it works for your friend doesn't mean it will work for you. That $100 Wintec may either work or not work for your horse and that $5000 Tad Coffin will either work or not work. If you need help with saddle fitting find a professional fitter (not just a rep) or a trainer who has a good eye for fit and checks the fit in all dimensions rather than just sticking 4 fingers under the gullet and thinking a half-pad is the panacea to all fitting problems. A poor fit can quickly cause training, behavioral, and medical issues down the road.

    Always expect the unexpected. It is always better to overbudget and come up with a plan ahead of time for the worst of scenarios. Horses are half-ton China glass that quite honestly...are very unintelligently designed. What will you do when your horse suddenly comes up lame? How much will you spend to diagnose the issue? How much will you spend to treat the issue? What will you do if your horse is unridable for a long period of time and needs special rehab? Will you spend thousands of dollars for surgery if the horse has a 50/50 chance of soundness? What will you do if your horse is permanently unridable? What if your horse colics? The lowest bill for a colic I've had was $500 for a minor colic that quickly turned around the same night. It cost $4000 for a colic that required the vet coming for 2-3 days but didn't require hospitalization. Colic surgery (for just the surgery alone) can cost $10-12k and usually there is a deposit of about $5000 down. This does not include hospitalization fees and aftercare. My friend bought a new horse and the very same night she brought it home the horse colicked and underwent surgery. She has spent 30k on surgery, hospitalization, aftercare, and rehab. The horse is permanently unsound.

    You need to ask yourself how much will you invest in your horse hobby or career? What are your limits? How will you prepare emotionally and financially?

    The best advice I can probably give is to do your research and listen to the bountiful advice from knowledgable horse owners and professionals. If you want to enjoy time on a horse but can't afford the expenses attached to ownership always look into leasing!
         
        05-25-2013, 05:04 PM
      #23
    Trained
    If owning horses was as difficult and expensive as this thread is beginning to indicate, there would be no new horse owners. It would be something you had to be born to do.

    Speaking as a relative newbie...no, I didn't know anything about horses. I didn't buy the right one. I didn't set aside 10K for emergencies. I didn't start with years of lessons, riding 45-60 minutes a week until I had an incredible seat. I'm still learning, as is the unsuitable horse I bought.

    Am I the only person who bought a horse and THEN learned to ride? Am I the only one who has never had a saddle fitter out to tell me what saddle to buy, and the only one whose horses don't get massages? Heck, I'm beginning to feel like running out to the corral and shouting, "Forgive me! I'm unworthy!" It is a good thing my horses don't have Internet access...
         
        05-25-2013, 05:49 PM
      #24
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by bsms    
    If owning horses was as difficult and expensive as this thread is beginning to indicate, there would be no new horse owners. It would be something you had to be born to do.

    Speaking as a relative newbie...no, I didn't know anything about horses. I didn't buy the right one. I didn't set aside 10K for emergencies. I didn't start with years of lessons, riding 45-60 minutes a week until I had an incredible seat. I'm still learning, as is the unsuitable horse I bought.

    Am I the only person who bought a horse and THEN learned to ride? Am I the only one who has never had a saddle fitter out to tell me what saddle to buy, and the only one whose horses don't get massages? Heck, I'm beginning to feel like running out to the corral and shouting, "Forgive me! I'm unworthy!" It is a good thing my horses don't have Internet access...
    LOL!!

    Hugs to you my dear! *None* of us do eveything perfectly! I put down my thoughts based on experiences that I have had, based on things I did right and things I wish I did differently, to put together my post. That is thirty plus years of blood, sweat, and tears, loving horses, losing them. Living with them and my fellow horse lovers. Everyone who has posted here is right in some way shape or form, including you. There is the ideal way to do anything, and then the reality.

    I think myself and the other posters are giving what we would recommend in the best case scenario. Nobody is perfect at anything, especially not horses. And believe me...no horse is perfect, but there will be perfect horses for you, if you love them.

    One of *my* experiences as a child, that was absolutely invaluable, was spending hours on a longe line, no stirrups, at all gaits. We could not "get our reins" until we could sit every gait, even posting, without stirrups. They were tough, but I have a very secure seat and good body position. Trust me, I have made a million mistakes with horses over the years, but that one experience, is one I wish I could give to every beginning rider. That is why I emphasized it so much in my post. I know good and well not everyone can or will do it, but if I can throw out the idea, I will.

    I noticed some other posters emphasized the financial aspect. That may have been what has affected them most in their lives with horses. I did not even mention it...I am far from rich, but have been budgeting for horse stuff most of my life, and completely forgot about it!!

    My hope is that newbies will read through these posts and get some good ideas, and maybe they will avoid making a mistake or two that the rest of us made. That's all
    bsms, Cinder, Canterklutz and 3 others like this.
         
        05-25-2013, 05:49 PM
      #25
    Showing
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by bsms    
    Am I the only person who bought a horse and THEN learned to ride? Am I the only one who has never had a saddle fitter out to tell me what saddle to buy, and the only one whose horses don't get massages? Heck, I'm beginning to feel like running out to the corral and shouting, "Forgive me! I'm unworthy!" It is a good thing my horses don't have Internet access...
    Well the things you mentioned that you didn't do generally make it easier on the horse. Sky was very very very locked up through his back. Had I not had a "chiropractor" or "sports masseuse" out there to sort him out, I probably would have either trashed my horse's back or been blessed with tickets to my own personal rodeo.

    I didn't buy Sky, he was given to me. I had ridden on and off years before then but I had no idea what I was doing..nor did Sky. We taught each other to be calm and mosey on along just fine. But if I had access to an amazing instructor like I have right now, we would have progressed much more steadily. Walk trot for 8 straight months every day is commendable since his trot is a dreamcastle now.. however he has just turned 12 this past April and is still green at the canter. This november I will have owned him for 3 years.

    As for saddle fit, I'm pretty good at detecting if a saddle doesn't work for my horse but I have no knowledge on how to make it fit via reflocking nor do I have an expert eye. I could miss things that matter.. and a fitting saddle is the difference between my horse having muscle atrophy or being nicely filled out.

    So while those things aren't "necessary" they do save time and trouble. But the wrong kind of those types of things (bad chiro/masseuse, bad saddle fitter, and bad instructor) probably do more harm than good. So you definitely should be careful and research those that you allow into your horse's and your own life.
    Saranda likes this.
         
        05-30-2013, 02:52 PM
      #26
    Foal
    Great thread! If it hasn't already been said, I have a tid bit to share.

    When people find out you are new they will ALL want to teach you. Everyone has different opinions on how your horse should be handled, fed, ridden, ect.They all have good intentions, but some people think they know a lot more than they really do. Find out who the 'reliable' sources at your barn are. My mentor once told me 'hear what everyone has to say, but only listen to the reliable sources'. If you get reliable sounding information from someone you don't know well, try running it by another person who you know is knowledgeable :)

    When I got my first horse after a 10 year riding break, I asked my barn manager who he believed were knowledgable people I could talk to. I found our that he was an ex vet, and he also introduced me to two farriers and some long time riders with a lot of knowledge. Talking to them has saved me a lot of time, worry, and money.
    bsms, wausuaw, frisbeeguy and 2 others like this.
         
        07-26-2013, 03:00 AM
      #27
    Foal
    Just wanted to say that this thread was very informative! I like seeing all the different opinions.
    Cinder likes this.
         
        08-03-2013, 02:56 AM
      #28
    Foal
    I personal think that beginners have not done the work to deserve a horse. Nothin irritates me more than seeing a six year old get a pony from daddy for Christmas, or even word grandpa, since I never had one. It may be jealousy, but I think it's my belief in hard work=reward. I have been riding for almost 12 years, since I was four, and I have learned all about horsemanship, I know how to fit a saddle, how to fix a behavioral problem, have helped train horses, rode green horses, handled foals, worked with stallions, been bucked off way too many times, and learned the most important lesson of life, when you fall, get back up an get back on. And you know how I learned it? By NOT Having my own horse. I have ridden a ton of different horses, and had the opportunity to do a lot of different things, I partially resent my parents for never getting me a horse, but I partially thank them. In my opinion, you need to have at least four years riding under your belt, I have eleven, and I still don't have a horse. You should be able to tell me how a saddle should fit, and recognize when it is correct, and when it is incorrect. You should be able to recognize colic, lameness, swelling, and heat, and other sicknesses. Flicka, the black stallion, dreamer and other movies may be good movies, but that's it, they are movies. They are not true, in moondance Alexander, the girl practically learns to jump in a month! It doesn't work that way, sorry! It's not a fairytale, it can be, but it can also be terrible, if you don't know what you are doing. You can get hurt really bad, and a horse can end up in a bad situation.
    Posted via Mobile Device
         
        08-03-2013, 03:42 AM
      #29
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by bsms    
    If owning horses was as difficult and expensive as this thread is beginning to indicate, there would be no new horse owners. It would be something you had to be born to do.

    Speaking as a relative newbie...no, I didn't know anything about horses. I didn't buy the right one. I didn't set aside 10K for emergencies. I didn't start with years of lessons, riding 45-60 minutes a week until I had an incredible seat. I'm still learning, as is the unsuitable horse I bought.

    Am I the only person who bought a horse and THEN learned to ride? Am I the only one who has never had a saddle fitter out to tell me what saddle to buy, and the only one whose horses don't get massages? Heck, I'm beginning to feel like running out to the corral and shouting, "Forgive me! I'm unworthy!" It is a good thing my horses don't have Internet access...
    Yeah, I bought the horse and then learned to ride.....by trial and error mostly. I think I've had maybe 3-4 lessons in 19 years. My Dad (I was a teenager when I got my first horse) thought nothing of it as he learned by trail and error as a child and because they were too poor to own a saddle he spent a lot of time on the ground (the horse was spooky and frequently dumped him). So Dad figured if I had a saddle I was already ahead of the game. My previous horse experience before owning a horse was riding nose-to-tail at a rental stable a few times a year on special occasions.

    We did manage to get me a good beginner's horse who taught me everything I know. And I wasn't riding around an arena either. I hit the trails right away, often solo. And I had to ride through neighborhood streets to get to the mountain preserve where I rode. So by most accounts I guess I shouldn't have survived. My Arabian took great care of me!

    My horses have never had a massage (unless it was just a good grooming) and they have never had a chiropractor. I don't use one for myself either. I have never even seen a professional saddle fitter in the flesh. This is cowboy country and I don't think they even come around these parts. I don't have a huge emergency fund. My emergency fund is also my hay fund. But my horses are well fed, get vet care when they need it, and are constantly having their hooves pedicured (since I do them myself). I am always researching nutrition, health, and training to be the best horse owner I can be.

    Yeah, my parents just went out and bought me a good beginner's horse and I learned to ride and lived to tell about it. No lessons to speak of, no leases, no fancy boarding barns (just other people's backyards). Maybe it could have been done better, but I'm not living in the lifestyles of the rich and famous.
         
        08-03-2013, 07:09 AM
      #30
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by bsms    
    If owning horses was as difficult and expensive as this thread is beginning to indicate, there would be no new horse owners. It would be something you had to be born to do.

    Am I the only one who has never had a saddle fitter out to tell me what saddle to buy, and the only one whose horses don't get massages? Heck, I'm beginning to feel like running out to the corral and shouting, "Forgive me! I'm unworthy!" It is a good thing my horses don't have Internet access...
    You are not alone

    Our mares see the vet once a year for their rabies, and I trim them/give shots/wormers myself. They eat pasture grass, free choice hay, a little feed from the local mill, and part of a carrot for a treat. We have three saddles, 15"-17". Semi and full qh bars, and three bridles that we use interchangeably and none are ever sore, buck, fuss, get white hairs/rubbing or anything. We never lunge them, but they are all handled a lot, are well mannered, and you can ride them everyday or once a month with no problem. Except for the occasional sprain or bruise, they are always healthy and ready to ride. They'll get a quick brushing before riding, but only get a "full" grooming every 4-6 weeks when I trim them.

    Some people tell us that we've just been lucky. Perhaps, and they all did come from the same well established breeder, but what are the chances? Keeping everything simple has worked for us for a long time, and they've been a lot less expensive then children
    kbg7506 likes this.
         

    Quick Reply
    Please help keep the Horse Forum enjoyable by reporting rude posts.
    Message:
    Options

    Register Now

    In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

    Already have a Horse Forum account?
    Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

    New to the Horse Forum?
    Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.

    User Name:
    Password
    Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
    Password:
    Confirm Password:
    Email Address
    Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
    Email Address:

    Log-in

    Human Verification

    In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



    Thread Tools

    Similar Threads
    Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
    What is this horse thinking? ShelbyLovesHorses Horse Talk 7 07-20-2012 05:07 PM
    A horse I'm thinking of buying SkyeDawn Horse Training 19 02-07-2012 03:49 PM
    Thinking of going to a Horse Auction pinkyshot Horse Talk 11 08-25-2011 01:27 AM
    Thinking about a horse... blackrose Horse Talk 5 04-01-2010 01:11 AM
    Thinking about getting rid of my horse. JavaLover Horses for Sale 12 01-03-2010 04:28 PM



    All times are GMT -4. The time now is 09:40 AM.


    Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
    Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
    Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0