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Thinking of getting your own horse?

This is a discussion on Thinking of getting your own horse? within the New to Horses forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category

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        01-07-2014, 03:37 AM
      #71
    Foal
    I am 15 and I really want my own horse I have had riding lessons for 4 months but before that I worked at a rescue with horses so I know how to care for them. My trainer has said she would come with me to make sure the horse is in good condition do you think im ready?
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        01-07-2014, 04:13 AM
      #72
    Super Moderator
    Have you calculated all the expenses? Being just 15, are you sure you will be able to afford to keep a horse? Or are your parents okay with paying for everything? And what about high school, going to college - are you going to be able to devote yourself to the horse in long term, will you ability to cover the expenses change then?

    Having had lessons only 4 months, I'd say you're still a little green. I'd advise that you rather loan a horse or keep getting your lessons - the more different horses you learn to ride on at the beginning of your experience, the better. ;)
         
        01-29-2014, 06:58 PM
      #73
    Foal
    Thank you for the advise. I began horse riding lessons about 6 months ago with the intent to buy my own horse eventually. Reading about horse ownership has caused me to curb my enthusiasm for buying my first horse until I am well schooled in horsemanship. I don't want to jump into ownership too fast and risk harm to a horse or myself. Thank you for your advise.
         
        01-29-2014, 08:43 PM
      #74
    Foal
    Hi there,

    Well I jumped in as a horse owner for the second time. This time my life is stable and I love the horse I purchased. The horse I purchased is a wonderful 13 yr old TW. She has excellent ground manners and is saddle ready, but not rider ready as she has not been ridden in a year - she was out to pasture. She is skiddish and I have been walking her about the neighborhood trying to get her to loosen up as we walk together. However she became very stubborn last night and I took treats with us - she did ok as she new I had treats. Then tonight she absolutely refused to leave the barn. No matter what I tried she wasn't moving. She thought I was coming out to feed her, but I heard that you make a horse work prior to feeding. It wasn't feeding time either. She got the best of me today as I left the barn without feeding her and without getting her to walk with me. I will feed her at the normal time. Does anyone have suggestions? I will be looking on line also. Thanks.
         
        02-06-2014, 08:53 PM
      #75
    Foal
    I found this really helpful!
         
        02-12-2014, 06:32 PM
      #76
    Foal
    Be aware! Not all people are honest. Take a experienced horse person with you when you purchase a horse. It will save you from getting attached to a problem horse and having to spend thousand of dollars on training.
         
        03-02-2014, 07:35 PM
      #77
    Foal
    Hi everyone!

    This is a great thread. I actually had to join the forum after reading through it.

    I am....well, I'm not going to say how old I am (LOL). But, I've been around the block a time or two. So, I know how easy it is to get really excited about something and then, once the hard work begins, have the luster wear off.

    I began weekly lessons last summer. I tried a couple disciplines and trainers before settling on hunt seat and my current trainer (who is amazing). My next step is to lease the horse that I am currently using for lessons so I can practice what I am learning. Thankfully, the lease is very generous (month to month) so as riders progress, they can move into horses that match their skill level.

    I DO see myself owning a horse one of these days. BUT, until I am a much better rider and horseman, I will not subject myself, my trainer and a horse to my learning curve.
    Corporal and Foxhunter like this.
         
        03-03-2014, 02:49 PM
      #78
    Foal
    My advice to a total beginner/novice rider is listed below.

    1.) Always have a professional involved somewhere.
    2.) Budget accordingly for PPE, vet, farrier, costs of upkeep, etc.
    3.) Leasing option is always the best way to go first. Most farms if you take lessons will more than likely have school horses up for lease during certain points of the year.
    4.) If you are willing to learn to become a better horseman and a better horse owner, spend more time around the barn if you are able to. Ask everything and anything that helps you gain more knowledge.
    5.) Don't settle. Buying horses is like dating, don't settle for the pretty boy/girl that is not a right fit, nor settle for the first one that comes along. Find the one that matches you best and meets your goals.
    6.) Before deciding, ride every breed, discipline, personality, etc. you get your hands on. It helps.
    7.) Always get a pre-purchase exam. It is expensive but buying a horse without one is like playing Russian Roulette.
    8.) I'd go with connections first before answering Craigslist or online horse ads. Networking is important.
    9.) If you are underage, especially in the 15-17 range, be cautious when buying because if college is a plan, you have to plan accordingly what you will be doing with said horse when the time comes. (I just think leasing is the best option in this case)
    Corporal and RegularJoe like this.
         
        03-06-2014, 08:58 PM
      #79
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by remka    
    I personal think that beginners have not done the work to deserve a horse. Nothin irritates me more than seeing a six year old get a pony from daddy for Christmas, or even word grandpa, since I never had one. It may be jealousy, but I think it's my belief in hard work=reward. I have been riding for almost 12 years, since I was four, and I have learned all about horsemanship, I know how to fit a saddle, how to fix a behavioral problem, have helped train horses, rode green horses, handled foals, worked with stallions, been bucked off way too many times, and learned the most important lesson of life, when you fall, get back up an get back on. And you know how I learned it? By NOT Having my own horse. I have ridden a ton of different horses, and had the opportunity to do a lot of different things, I partially resent my parents for never getting me a horse, but I partially thank them. In my opinion, you need to have at least four years riding under your belt, I have eleven, and I still don't have a horse. You should be able to tell me how a saddle should fit, and recognize when it is correct, and when it is incorrect. You should be able to recognize colic, lameness, swelling, and heat, and other sicknesses. Flicka, the black stallion, dreamer and other movies may be good movies, but that's it, they are movies. They are not true, in moondance Alexander, the girl practically learns to jump in a month! It doesn't work that way, sorry! It's not a fairytale, it can be, but it can also be terrible, if you don't know what you are doing. You can get hurt really bad, and a horse can end up in a bad situation.
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    I think this is an incredibly unfair attitude. Not all of us had access to horses growing up, as you do. I grew up in a suburb south of New Orleans. Not to many horses out there, and we were to poor to pay for lessons. I had to settle for my dad taking me to City Park on occasion to see the NOPD mounts. I can't tell you how much I would have loved to have had the opportunities you have. Now that I'm 37 yrs old and FINALLY have the opportunity to make my lifelong dream of owning a horse a reality soon, I'm going to learn all I can to do so. But to say someone like me doesn't deserve a horse because they haven't "worked" for it....that's sad.
         
        03-07-2014, 11:48 AM
      #80
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Livinitup    
    My advice to a total beginner/novice rider is listed below.

    5.) Don't settle. Buying horses is like dating, don't settle for the pretty boy/girl that is not a right fit, nor settle for the first one that comes along. Find the one that matches you best and meets your goals.
    Well said. ESPECIALLY #5.
         

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