Young horse for newbie owner.
 
 

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Young horse for newbie owner.

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        07-25-2014, 11:00 AM
      #1
    Weanling
    Young horse for newbie owner.

    This is not usually recommended for anyone of my level of experience by anyone (including myself) who even has an inkling of horse knowledge, but I want to get some input.

    I'm thinking about getting a weanling. First horse. Must be crazy.

    Before you start going off the deep end, hear me out.

    First of all, I have to wait until I'm out of college, in the workforce, and have a good amount saved up for emergencies (not to mention the things I have to buy straight out or pay for over time). So, I'm looking at 5+ years before I'm ready to get any horse. That's 5+ years to research and gain experiences whenever I have the time.

    Second, I plan to surround myself with people who are knowledgeable and experienced. Good trainer, good barn, good support system. I want to be as involved in my horse's training as possible, but I will not buy a weanling unless I can find a trainer that I can trust first.

    Third, I'm making preparations. This is something that I want to do, and do right. Period. There is no option of dropping the ball. I hear horror stories of people who get foals with good intentions and then turn them into pasture puffs because they get "over horsed". Not this girl. I will not move forward until I know for sure what I'm getting into. Research, lessons, leases, other ways to get experience with horses of all ages, etc.

    Still sounds like a bad idea? Probably. But, hopefully not as bad.

    Now's the part where I need help. I need help with finding ways to make connections and gain experiences beforehand. I don't know where to get hands on training experience. I don't know where to find young horses that I can learn to handle. I don't know if there are even ways to get experience for people like me. So, I'm open to any ideas.
         
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        07-25-2014, 11:03 AM
      #2
    Green Broke
    My question is... why? What's appealing about a weanling that you can't get in something that's (at the lower end of the spectrum) two-four years old?
    2BigReds, EliRose, BKLD and 3 others like this.
         
        07-25-2014, 11:15 AM
      #3
    Weanling
    I strongly suspect that if you do your research properly, you'll start with a broke young horse 5 to 9 years old. Responsible, mature, reflective individuals recognize the glut of auction and slaughter horses, and don't want to contribute to the practice. We all start out thinking nothing in our lives will change and that whatever horse we get to learn on will be with us for always--or that we will do SUCH a great job that he will never be thrown away--but the reality is that greenies have rarely been confronted with the utterly daunting task of bringing a young horse to citizenship. There is nothing more humbling than realizing you don't know what you're doing and the horse is becoming dangerous. Even on a solid citizen, the moment you realize you don't know what you don't know is humbling.

    You, right now, don't know what you don't know...about everything.

    Your plan seems sound, but I suspect that as you research, you'll find that it is too risky for you AND the young, vulnerable horse to start off training a weanling. Too much can go wrong, and then you've ruined an innocent animal.

    Volunteer at rescues, training barns, work like a slave. There is so much to learn, and it takes a lifetime to learn it.
         
        07-25-2014, 11:32 AM
      #4
    Cat
    Green Broke
    I did this. I bought a yearling as my first horse out of college. Kept him at a knowledgeable barn, had them professionally train him, and then made years and years of mistakes as I learned how to deal with issues that would have been much easier with an already trained horse (even with support, you will still make mistakes and young horses are much less forgiving).

    I learned a hell of a lot, but at what cost to that particular horse? Our second baby went so much smoother after I had the knowledge I needed and he is now a very solid citizen as a 9 year old. You can see the better start he had in life. Personally I think I would have been much happier getting an already trained, ready-to-go and trustworthy horse as my very first horse. It would have also been much more fair to my first horse if I had done that as well.

    And with the horses I have had since, there is one thing I realized. Just because you raise them from a baby does not mean you will have a better "bond" or be a better match. I had that horse for 10 years but we never really connected well in that time, but on the other hand I have bought older horses that I had an immediate connection with and we work well together in a way I never could with that first horse.

    So can you succeed with a weanling as you first horse? Maybe - with the right support and research. But don't be surprised if it does not work out the way you expect it too.
         
        07-25-2014, 11:33 AM
      #5
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Zexious    
    My question is... why? What's appealing about a weanling that you can't get in something that's (at the lower end of the spectrum) two-four years old?
    It may sound naive...but I want the experience of training from the ground up, with an experienced trainer by my side of course to make sure that everything goes well. I've always been fascinated by the development of young animals, physically and cognitively. I haven't seen but a taste of it, but I absolutely love the feeling from watching them as they figure out what they're supposed to do, and the feeling from seeing them succeed is amazing. I want to be a part of that process, if any of that makes sense. I just think that there is more to the experience than riding.

    It's very possible that I'll change my mind. Very possible. But, I need more experience to say for sure.
    texasgal likes this.
         
        07-25-2014, 11:43 AM
      #6
    Weanling
    Nope. Get a 8+ horse, stick with that for many years, then think about it. I have owned for almost 10 years and I got a weanling. There is a lot of work and hours and hours doing the training, and even though I had the knowledge of horses that wasn't enough. I didn't know about training but thankfully financially I could ask for help from a local trainer. He helped me through the rough spots when I was at a loss, and he backed him and did 30 days training on him. That was expensive. I learned a ton throughout my journey with Mocha and we are at a good place now and he did turn out to be what I was looking for. You don't know what you don't know about this, and if you did you would know your plan is not a good idea. TBH your plan is not fair to the horse.
    Cat, HagonNag, EliRose and 2 others like this.
         
        07-25-2014, 11:43 AM
      #7
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Cat    
    I did this. I bought a yearling as my first horse out of college. Kept him at a knowledgeable barn, had them professionally train him, and then made years and years of mistakes as I learned how to deal with issues that would have been much easier with an already trained horse (even with support, you will still make mistakes and young horses are much less forgiving).

    I learned a hell of a lot, but at what cost to that particular horse? Our second baby went so much smoother after I had the knowledge I needed and he is now a very solid citizen as a 9 year old. You can see the better start he had in life. Personally I think I would have been much happier getting an already trained, ready-to-go and trustworthy horse as my very first horse. It would have also been much more fair to my first horse if I had done that as well.

    And with the horses I have had since, there is one thing I realized. Just because you raise them from a baby does not mean you will have a better "bond" or be a better match. I had that horse for 10 years but we never really connected well in that time, but on the other hand I have bought older horses that I had an immediate connection with and we work well together in a way I never could with that first horse.

    So can you succeed with a weanling as you first horse? Maybe - with the right support and research. But don't be surprised if it does not work out the way you expect it too.
    I'm hopeful, but I'm not a fool about it for sure. With bond, I think it's a gamble no matter where you go. It may be easier to tell with an older horse, but in a quick visit and a ride, there's so much that you can't tell. That said, I don't expect to get a better bond from a youngster. While I do look at training as a bonding experience, it doesn't mean much as working with an older horse is just as good a bonding experience.
    texasgal likes this.
         
        07-25-2014, 11:47 AM
      #8
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Cat    
    I did this. I bought a yearling as my first horse out of college. Kept him at a knowledgeable barn, had them professionally train him, and then made years and years of mistakes as I learned how to deal with issues that would have been much easier with an already trained horse (even with support, you will still make mistakes and young horses are much less forgiving).

    I learned a hell of a lot, but at what cost to that particular horse? Our second baby went so much smoother after I had the knowledge I needed and he is now a very solid citizen as a 9 year old. You can see the better start he had in life. Personally I think I would have been much happier getting an already trained, ready-to-go and trustworthy horse as my very first horse. It would have also been much more fair to my first horse if I had done that as well.

    And with the horses I have had since, there is one thing I realized. Just because you raise them from a baby does not mean you will have a better "bond" or be a better match. I had that horse for 10 years but we never really connected well in that time, but on the other hand I have bought older horses that I had an immediate connection with and we work well together in a way I never could with that first horse.

    So can you succeed with a weanling as you first horse? Maybe - with the right support and research. But don't be surprised if it does not work out the way you expect it too.
    Exactly Cat.
         
        07-25-2014, 11:48 AM
      #9
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Mochachino    
    Nope. Get a 8+ horse, stick with that for many years, then think about it. I have owned for almost 10 years and I got a weanling. There is a lot of work and hours and hours doing the training, and even though I had the knowledge of horses that wasn't enough. I didn't know about training but thankfully financially I could ask for help from a local trainer. He helped me through the rough spots when I was at a loss, and he backed him and did 30 days training on him. That was expensive. I learned a ton throughout my journey with Mocha and we are at a good place now and he did turn out to be what I was looking for. You don't know what you don't know about this, and if you did you would know your plan is not a good idea. TBH your plan is not fair to the horse.
    I have no problem with the workload. As I said, the training is an experience in itself, not work for me. And, I fully intend on finding a trainer. Won't even consider buying a youngster without finding a trainer FIRST.

    That said, I will take into consideration your thoughts. I will want to get a youngster eventually, but maybe not first? No idea at this point.
    texasgal likes this.
         
        07-25-2014, 11:52 AM
      #10
    Weanling
    Quick idea, do you think that there are there any trainers that might allow me to shadow/apprentice under them? Think they would find that disagreeable?
    texasgal and 2BigReds like this.
         

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