Young horse for newbie owner. - Page 2
 
 

       The Horse Forum > Keeping and Caring for Horses > New to Horses

Young horse for newbie owner.

This is a discussion on Young horse for newbie owner. within the New to Horses forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category

    Like Tree199Likes

     
    LinkBack Thread Tools
        07-25-2014, 10:58 AM
      #11
    Weanling
    Yep, I REALLY hate to be Debbie Downer (I am assuming that you are indeed a newbie to riding as well as owning??) I've been riding for 10+ years, for those years I have been taking lessons every week at lease once. I leased/part-leased horses for some where around 4 years. I could probably rattle off about 4 or 5 dozen horses that I've WORKED with (by that I mean have ridden at some point consistently for MULTIPLE rides and lessons) that had problems anywhere from refusing to move to bolting, bucking, rearing, laying down and rolling (appropriately named Boogie) or spooking at absolutely nothing, etc.
    With that said I just got my first horse this year and she is a SOLID citizen just needs some polishing. Even then I was still a nervous mess taking her home and there have been days where I am screwing up constantly.
    I think that a lot of people think of owning their own horse as "they don't have to deal with other students unschooling the horse" and this true but as with my current trainer she schooled ALL her lesson horses a few times a week so any gaps were filled in. With my mare I am doing all the riding if she gets away with something with me she WILL do it again
    Anyways I hope you understood all that rambling and good luck in whatever you decide to do although MY vote would be to get a horse that is AT THE VERY LEAST started under saddle with good riding and ground foundation. If you want your fix of younger horses try volunteering at a rescue or something of the likes
    2BigReds and BKLD like this.
         
    Sponsored Links
    Advertisement
     
        07-25-2014, 11:01 AM
      #12
    Weanling
    It's a job. A real job. Training barns are often looking for muckers and stable hands. It isn't glamorous, but it gets you in the door, and you learn about horses from the ground up. You start cleaning stalls and watering, then move to feeding, then to leading horses in and out of pastures. Eventually, if you're around long enough and show interest, you may start lunging or tacking up. Then maybe you might get to exercise older, well-broke horses (after lessons, of course). Then maybe you'll ride progressively greener animals. Eventually, you might get to sit in on training sessions and helping with halter breaking. See the progression? Don't learn from just ANY trainer. Backyard Bob is NOT a horse trainer. He's a breaker, and won't often have good skills--just tricks that sometimes work.

    Think of breaking a horse as one of the most important jobs you'll ever have--because what you do or don't do can make or RUIN a horse for life. If you fail, you've potentially signed a horse's death warrant--certainly, you've introduced it to hell on earth. It should be daunting and it should be viewed as a sober responsibility with dramatic consequences.
    2BigReds, EliRose, Marcie and 4 others like this.
         
        07-25-2014, 11:05 AM
      #13
    Green Broke
    As Cat mentioned, I did the same thing. I purchased a weanling. At the time I had nine years of riding experience, and two years of training experience. It was a bad choice. I sold this horse a few years ago--she turned out not to be what I wanted. Though her weanling self looked perfect for as a Hunter prospect, her matured self was definitely a WP prospect... not my cup of tea. It was heart breaking.

    Get something you know you will enjoy. That's my advice.
         
        07-25-2014, 11:09 AM
      #14
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by DreaMy    
    Yep, I REALLY hate to be Debbie Downer (I am assuming that you are indeed a newbie to riding as well as owning??) I've been riding for 10+ years, for those years I have been taking lessons every week at lease once. I leased/part-leased horses for some where around 4 years. I could probably rattle off about 4 or 5 dozen horses that I've WORKED with (by that I mean have ridden at some point consistently for MULTIPLE rides and lessons) that had problems anywhere from refusing to move to bolting, bucking, rearing, laying down and rolling (appropriately named Boogie) or spooking at absolutely nothing, etc.
    With that said I just got my first horse this year and she is a SOLID citizen just needs some polishing. Even then I was still a nervous mess taking her home and there have been days where I am screwing up constantly.
    I think that a lot of people think of owning their own horse as "they don't have to deal with other students unschooling the horse" and this true but as with my current trainer she schooled ALL her lesson horses a few times a week so any gaps were filled in. With my mare I am doing all the riding if she gets away with something with me she WILL do it again
    Anyways I hope you understood all that rambling and good luck in whatever you decide to do although MY vote would be to get a horse that is AT THE VERY LEAST started under saddle with good riding and ground foundation. If you want your fix of younger horses try volunteering at a rescue or something of the likes
    I understood just fine, and I will definitely take that into consideration . I would place myself at...I don't know, advanced beginner probably? Ridden off and on since I was 2 years old (20 now). Confident around horses for the most part (I don't do well in the spotlight though, so I'm working on building confidence in lessons). Still a bit shaky with groundwork, which is why I want to find a trainer to shadow. Very fast learner though. Always have been. That's the only reason why I'm even considering a youngster.
    texasgal likes this.
         
        07-25-2014, 11:11 AM
      #15
    Foal
    Do you know what discipline you are wanting to ride? Even buying a well broke horse you are still going to be able to teach and watch them learn new things as you get better. The great part with a broke horse would be that they would help you get to their level and then you can help them get to the next level and keep progressing in whatever discipline you choose. You have to remember that you never stop learning and neither does the horse!!
         
        07-25-2014, 11:12 AM
      #16
    Weanling
    In response to your question about finding someone to teach you about training: Some lesson coaches who also train horses on the side will also give you some lesson on "training". My coach who has been training horses will give us ground lessons when the weather is no good to ride and show us the back to basics of ground training: how to halter break, round penning, ground driving, etc its hard work and that is with already trained horses who have been through it a million times... I had a hard time ground driving the mare I was taking lessons on AND she was a trained cart horse
    I'm thinking that maybe you could find a trainer who would teach you some ground training basics (although that would be for $$)
    Also ok I thought maybe you had gotten into riding recently (like yesterday )
    BKLD likes this.
         
        07-25-2014, 11:16 AM
      #17
    Trained
    If you were in Australia I'd let you ride my coming-four-year-old.

    I've put my favourite cousin [who is six and hasn't ridden much] on her. She is extraordinarily quiet. Under me, she's fearless. She's never been quite as relaxed with other riders but I think we can safely assume that's because I started her [STUPID STUPID IDEA I DID NOT HAVE NEARLY ENOUGH KNOWLEDGE OR EXPERIENCE] and other than maybe seven rides all her riding has been done by me. All her training is definitely mine. She's been trained to respond to the way I ride and being a horse that lives to please and is afraid of making a mistake, she's most comfortable when she knows exactly what she's being asked. Any uncertainty [even minor physical differences between myself and, say, a slightly shorter or taller rider] puts her on edge. But her behaviour is always impeccable.

    She is my fifth and current horse and if I had a choice in the matter she would be staying with me for another 20 years but unfortunately finances have tightened and I can't justify the expense of a horse I can't ride for more than 15 minutes every two weeks. I won't be able to for quite a long time at the rate my darned knee is(n't) healing. Maybe even years.

    Anyway... yes it can be done.

    BUT...

    Looking back I acknowledge that it was utterly STUPID of me to take Magic on. I did NOT have the knowledge and what's worse, I was ARROGANT and thought I didn't need help. I have no idea how I survived, short of the fact that my horse, despite all her issues and fears (long story, very very long story, do you have all year?), always had a basically amazing temperament. She had dangerous explosive freakouts out of nowhere but never ONCE did she cause me pain. And I copped more than a few front hooves to the ribs! She could have KILLED me. Would have had she wanted to, or had I pushed her just that little bit harder. But she didn't want to be that terrified, dangerous horse. She wanted to be the horse she is now. I think that's why I never gave up.

    I still don't know how I've made it to two years with this horse [less three days] without once being injured because of her. And I won't be. She's not that dangerous creature anymore.

    I will repeat it was UTTERLY STUPID OF ME to take her on with the knowledge I had. Would I do it again? Probably not. Not for a long while, at least. And I would DEFINITELY make sure I had one thing I was stupid enough to think I didn't need the first time around - QUALIFIED HELP.

    Would I be the person doing the actual starting to saddle again? Yeah, if I knew I could trust my knee. Before I injured it I had two horses lined up as my very first client horses. I've done, to quote my occasional coach, "a darn fine job" with two of them now, two completely different personality types. I like taking a blank canvas and turning it into something beautiful. I am a creator by nature. I've never liked fixing other people's mistakes in my horses and if not for my knee I would never buy a broke horse again because I personally prefer the ups and downs of babies to plugging other people's training holes.

    But would I KNOWINGLY work with a troubled horse? Probably not. Been there, done that, I kind of value my life and being out of action due to injury just completely sucks. MY troubled horse wasn't so far gone that she ever hurt anyone. Someone else's might be.

    AND NO MATTER WHAT, if I ever train a horse again, I will be working with a darn good coach.

    If I get back in the saddle with my knee reliable enough to have one horse in eventing work I will look at taking on another baby Thoroughbred. If I don't, it's steady plodders and trail rides once or twice a week for me.
    2BigReds, BKLD and DreaMy like this.
         
        07-25-2014, 11:18 AM
      #18
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by skiafoxmorgan    
    it's a job. A real job. Training barns are often looking for muckers and stable hands. It isn't glamorous, but it gets you in the door, and you learn about horses from the ground up. You start cleaning stalls and watering, then move to feeding, then to leading horses in and out of pastures. Eventually, if you're around long enough and show interest, you may start lunging or tacking up. Then maybe you might get to exercise older, well-broke horses (after lessons, of course). Then maybe you'll ride progressively greener animals. Eventually, you might get to sit in on training sessions and helping with halter breaking. See the progression? Don't learn from just ANY trainer. Backyard Bob is NOT a horse trainer. He's a breaker, and won't often have good skills--just tricks that sometimes work.

    Think of breaking a horse as one of the most important jobs you'll ever have--because what you do or don't do can make or RUIN a horse for life. If you fail, you've potentially signed a horse's death warrant--certainly, you've introduced it to hell on earth. It should be daunting and it should be viewed as a sober responsibility with dramatic consequences.
    Thank you for that perspective. I will see what I can do about finding a training barn in need of workers. I will also be incredibly careful in my search for a trainer. That's why I asked if I could shadow or apprentice. I want to see them in action.

    Breaking is indeed a sober responsibility. While I knew that it has a high risk of devastating failure, I never really saw it that way. I tend to look at it still as more than that, as a learning and bonding opportunity, albeit one that can go easily amiss. All the more reason to have someone who really knows what they're doing.
    texasgal likes this.
         
        07-25-2014, 11:21 AM
      #19
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by DreaMy    
    In response to your question about finding someone to teach you about training: Some lesson coaches who also train horses on the side will also give you some lesson on "training". My coach who has been training horses will give us ground lessons when the weather is no good to ride and show us the back to basics of ground training: how to halter break, round penning, ground driving, etc its hard work and that is with already trained horses who have been through it a million times... I had a hard time ground driving the mare I was taking lessons on AND she was a trained cart horse
    I'm thinking that maybe you could find a trainer who would teach you some ground training basics (although that would be for $$)
    Also ok I thought maybe you had gotten into riding recently (like yesterday )
    Nope, I've been around horses for a little while, just not so much that I would consider myself to be "experienced".
    texasgal likes this.
         
        07-25-2014, 11:30 AM
      #20
    Weanling
    I think I'll add, since a lot of people are saying to find a horse that I know is what I want, I don't have a specific "want" right now. That may change as time goes on, and if it does I will be looking at started horses, but right now this will likely be a pleasure/trail horse, not a competition prospect. It probably seems like a lot of time, energy, and money to put into an animal that I won't be taking to competition, but I still see it as an experience, not a means to an end.
    texasgal likes this.
         

    Thread Tools

    Similar Threads
    Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
    Newbie/Business Owner! LindsayLee Meet the Community 2 02-20-2014 11:37 PM
    Leasing from a newbie owner.... LauraJo Horse Talk 14 10-09-2012 09:16 AM
    Newbie horse owner questions about the basics boajangle Meet the Community 9 08-07-2012 12:36 AM
    Newbie Horse Owner! Chele11 Horse Nutrition 14 07-14-2012 02:16 PM
    Young Rider, Young horse Cowboy Ken Horse Videos 14 11-08-2010 12:00 PM



    All times are GMT -4. The time now is 01:50 PM.


    Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
    Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
    Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0