Is training a mule different then training a horse? - Page 2
 
 

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Is training a mule different then training a horse?

This is a discussion on Is training a mule different then training a horse? within the Other Equines forums, part of the Horse Breeds, Breeding, and Genetics category
  • Teaching the mule to break at the poll
  • Are mules flighty like a horse

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    07-21-2012, 12:52 AM
  #11
Showing
Oh, and did I mention that mules are a lot quicker to kick than a horse is? This little guy reminded me of that today when he swatted me a good one in the knee while I was brushing the dust off him.
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    07-22-2012, 12:32 AM
  #12
Yearling
I've never trained a mule, so I can't add anything to this thread.

I heard they were different than horses. When I was training and heard this idea, I decided not to take mules on because, if they *were* different than horses, I would probably ruin one instead of help it. So I stayed away.

Now that I hear the complete opposite, I'm interested.

I did ride a mule when I was younger. Her name was Rabbit and she was such a goofball. Once you caught her, you had to DRAG her into the barn. She would take off with you numerous times and drag you BACK to the field. You would have to hang on and drag her back when she was done. When you got to the barn and tied her, she'd rear up on the wall and be a general pain.

Saddle her up and hit the trails, she was a doll.



Now that I hear that you train a mule how a horse should be trained, I'm pretty interested in persuing that. Hopefully in the next 10 years or so I'll come across someone who has a mule and be able to observe what happens between it and its rider, and then maybe buy one after making an educated decision. I always wanted a mule.
     
    07-22-2012, 01:08 AM
  #13
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Copperhead    
I've never trained a mule, so I can't add anything to this thread.

I heard they were different than horses. When I was training and heard this idea, I decided not to take mules on because, if they *were* different than horses, I would probably ruin one instead of help it. So I stayed away.

Now that I hear the complete opposite, I'm interested.

I did ride a mule when I was younger. Her name was Rabbit and she was such a goofball. Once you caught her, you had to DRAG her into the barn. She would take off with you numerous times and drag you BACK to the field. You would have to hang on and drag her back when she was done. When you got to the barn and tied her, she'd rear up on the wall and be a general pain.

Saddle her up and hit the trails, she was a doll.



Now that I hear that you train a mule how a horse should be trained, I'm pretty interested in persuing that. Hopefully in the next 10 years or so I'll come across someone who has a mule and be able to observe what happens between it and its rider, and then maybe buy one after making an educated decision. I always wanted a mule.
If you get a mule with nice disposition you'll be amazed what you can do with it.
This video was taken 10 days in to training. When he came to me, he never had a saddle on him before.
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    07-24-2012, 12:58 PM
  #14
Started
Smrobs, I'd be really interested to hear your viewpoint on something: My riding instructor swears up and down that training mustangs is a heck of a lot like training mules. Mostly she says that they think things through more than your average horse. Her favorite saying is: "A horse may kick; but a mule aims."

I know that you've had personal experience training both mustangs and mules Smrobs, so I'm really curious to know your viewpoint on this. Are there similarities between the mentality of mustangs and mules?
     
    07-24-2012, 01:54 PM
  #15
Showing
"A horse may kick; but a mule aims."

I like that! So true, too .

There wasn't much difference in my 2 mustangs than there has been in most of the young horses I've trained. Where the mustangs were a bit more flighty, they still reacted like a pretty typical horse. Dang mules, however, are just all around more difficult.

For example, when you are teaching a horse to break at the poll, you can just keep pressure until they break at the poll then release. You can wait until later in their training to work on getting them to back up with their neck tucked. A mule, however, you better keep hold of him until he backs up right from the start. If you let him get the idea that he can just tuck his nose and not move his feet, you'll have hell ever getting him to go backward LOL.

There are a few thousand other little minute differences, but in my limited experience with mustangs, they generally reacted more like horses than mules.
     

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