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My foster dog is attacking people...help!

This is a discussion on My foster dog is attacking people...help! within the Other Pets forums, part of the Life Beyond Horses category

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        04-21-2013, 09:02 PM
      #11
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by xxEmilyxx    
    . I just don't understand what is triggering it. Why does he do this to some people and not others?
    Sorry I mistook the above as you don't understand and or see what is triggering the dog. My bad.
         
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        04-21-2013, 09:07 PM
      #12
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Lopin N Paint    
    Sorry I mistook the above as you don't understand and or see what is triggering the dog. My bad.
    No. I don't understand why THAT particular person was causing it.

    Really though, it seems as though you think that if you're not a professional, you should never foster a dog. Gee that'd be great. Then the shelter can put down loads more dogs!
         
        04-21-2013, 10:21 PM
      #13
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by CowboyBob    
    I really like the "dog wisperer" crap what's his name, anyway check out the turn arounds he has had with dog. I really like his show, he seems to do great work with dogs.
    Cesar Millan. His methods are out dated, and proven wrong, and very dangerous.

    He is leaning though, and in his newer shows he is going more to positive training.
         
        04-21-2013, 10:32 PM
      #14
    Started
    If it were me with this dog, I would try the following:

    Stop allowing him on your bed, or lap, or sofa etc; stop letting him 'cuddle into you' and emotionally claim you. I would continue to show him love, but only with his four paws on the floor, and only when you initiate it, not him.

    I would make a point of demanding good behaviour and respect - sitting or lying as appropriate when other people come into the house, and I would not allow any kind of territorial behaviour. By which I mean barking, growling, space-hogging etc.

    I would hope to see a change in behaviour fairly quickly as his place in the household is changed - but I would also expect him to want to take back his former role, so would always be on the look out for him trying to be the top male.

    IF there was an improvement, I would consider fostering him out to an adult only experienced home with full discussion of his mentality and history.

    Oh, and yes, I would most definitely have him neutered properly. For his sake as well as yours.
    mvinotime and Critter sitter like this.
         
        04-22-2013, 01:00 AM
      #15
    Started
    He would be on the nothing in life is free program here. And I'd do exactly what the above poster said.
    Posted via Mobile Device
    Wallaby and myhorsesonador like this.
         
        04-22-2013, 01:03 AM
      #16
    Weanling
    Would it be so expensive for a surgical neuter? Around here animal services gives out vouchers and there is a place called petsnip that does it for about $60 a dog. There are discounts for those working with rescues and I think for Pitt breeds it is free. Of course that is here, but I would think there would be a cheap spay neuter place somewhere near you. Maybe call the local vets and see if anyone gives a discount for rescued dogs. Maybe not tell them he is aggressive, but say that he is having destructive behaviors (peeing/marking/roaming).

    Was your friend staring and making direct eye contact? Dogs are really picky about that! Every dog I have had does not like it when a stranger stares at them.

    Given the way my neighbor's horse changed due to testosterone- I would think that was the majority of the issue in itself. He was the calmest horse, and she rode him around bareback on trail rides by herself and then WHAM he started getting aggressive, rearing, trying to attack my horses through the fence. A complete personality change.

    I would get him in soon before the behavior becomes a habit. Definitely call around for price quotes.
         
        04-23-2013, 03:46 AM
      #17
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Shropshirerosie    
    If it were me with this dog, I would try the following:

    Stop allowing him on your bed, or lap, or sofa etc; stop letting him 'cuddle into you' and emotionally claim you. I would continue to show him love, but only with his four paws on the floor, and only when you initiate it, not him.

    I would make a point of demanding good behaviour and respect - sitting or lying as appropriate when other people come into the house, and I would not allow any kind of territorial behaviour. By which I mean barking, growling, space-hogging etc.

    I would hope to see a change in behaviour fairly quickly as his place in the household is changed - but I would also expect him to want to take back his former role, so would always be on the look out for him trying to be the top male.

    IF there was an improvement, I would consider fostering him out to an adult only experienced home with full discussion of his mentality and history.

    Oh, and yes, I would most definitely have him neutered properly. For his sake as well as yours.
    First off, I have never heard of the neuter injection for dogs (only rabbits, etc.!), but he does definitely need to be properly neutered if all the injection does is makes him unsterile. By not being correctly neutered, he is still going to act like an intact male dog, which could lead to aggression (mainly towards other dogs), dominance (of other dogs and people), possessiveness/protectiveness (especially of humans, as you are experiencing now), etc.

    Secondly, I agree with most of what Shropshirerosie said. The dog needs to learn that his family and visitors are in charge. When visitors come into the house, he should be on-leash and sitting or laying down on a "spot" where you tell him to stay. He should not be allowed to rush up to the visitor to say hello, and he must remain calm before the visitor bothers to say hello to him. It does sound like he is being protective of you. In that case, he is to not be allowed on the bed (couch, chair, etc.) where you or your visitor is sitting. If he jumps onto the bed, get him off immediately. If he does so and acts aggressive, dominant, or protective, get him off imediately and put him on a "spot" again, where he is to sit/lay until you say otherwise. If he is crate trained, do NOT use the crate to punish him. In locking him out of the room like you did or putting him in the crate, you are more or less just ignoring the issue and not addressing it. By allowing him to sit there and growl at your friend through the crate, he was escalating the issue while you were not properly corrected him, and he still got his way.

    If you are walking around the house with the visitor and the dog acts up, do the same thing I mentioned above in sending him away to sit/lay on his "spot". At this point, it is best if you are the one to correct him, not your visitor, since he will still be learning what you are expecting of him.

    I do not know the severity of the situation so can not comment on what type of home he should be placed into. IF in fact this is the issue (being protective), informing his adopters of the issue is a must, even if he seems fine when being adopted, as the issue may return without proper managing of the behavior.
         
        04-23-2013, 08:07 AM
      #18
    Started
    Please don't listen to the above advice. Correcting a dog for growling will lead to the dog learning not to give warning before resorting to more intense methods of expressing his fear, like biting. Growling is him saying "I'm scared, stop what you are doing or I will have to do more."

    Dogs don't growl or bite out of aggression or meanness, but out of fear. To me it sounds like he could have been resource guarding you or the house/bed from your friend.

    A dog can resource guard anything.

    The dog should be neutered and you should find a behaviorist to work with. You can afford to have him neutered if you save up money.

    This dog should never be trusted 100% and should absolutely NOT go to a home with children. That is so dangerous. It makes my head spin that you would consider that.
    Posted via Mobile Device
         
        04-23-2013, 11:27 AM
      #19
    Green Broke
    2 year old ? And 9 months of that likely in a cage in a shelter with minimal human or really even other dog interaction ? He hasnt been socialized, and may not ever be completely stable in the head. Not sure if socializing him now will help or not but he probably is going to be a one person dog,
    myhorsesonador and Corporal like this.
         
        04-23-2013, 12:09 PM
      #20
    Green Broke
    With all of the sweet-natured dogs that are being put down every day bc they aren't enough homes, consider that THIS one was going to be euthanised for good reasons. Put away your emotions and use your head. Put him down before he bites someone and you get sued. Then, look for the sweet puppy you really want.
         
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