This really grinds my gears (Rant!) - Page 4 - The Horse Forum

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post #31 of 44 Old 03-22-2013, 03:25 PM
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I always say that no puppy is born aggressive. The problem with pit bulls and other bully breeds is that they require attention and need jobs to do. Similar to a border collie, they easily get bored. They are strong, overpowering dogs and those cute puppies grow quick, and when they become bothersome adults, they get banished to the yard, chained to trees with heavy logging chains, and fed once a day. You chain me to a tree and pay me no attention, when I finally break loose, I am going to be looking for blood too. In the 80's it was a different dog that was dangerous. I wish people would quit blaming the breed and start blaming the owners. Dogs require obediance, training, and love. They are pack animals and just want to be part of a pack with an effective alpha who will keep them safe and fed.
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post #32 of 44 Old 03-22-2013, 03:28 PM
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It was a little terrier cross that attacked me, probably 20 pounds. He latched onto my right arm, biting four of my fingers bloody, and my wrist. I have the scars from that, I ended up lifting him and hitting him into a wall to get him to let go.

All so bit by a border collie/lab cross, I'm not even sure how that happened.

Both dogs had metal instablities since puppyhood. Neither could be trusted and would often "snap" while otherwise appearing to be great dogs.

People that breed for tough looking and behavior in dogs, or not care about what is produced is the problem. Because of the rep of the APBT those people take advantage of that, a lot of not so bright people buy dogs based on looks and assumed behaviors. APBT do not have a locking jaw! They do have strong jaw muscles due to the shape of their head. Yes there is dogs regardless of breed (a lot of assumed APBTs are not they offend are crosses) that will attack due to lack of socialization, training, bad owners, and poor breeding. It happens in all breeds, unlucky for APBTs their history is a harsh one.

I have tons of people that admire my border collie, but I discourage as many as possible from getting one, they are high energy, destructive, and can be nerotic in behavior that will drive most people mad. He needs two walks a day, fetch in between, special diet because he burns calories like mad, and if not he digs, chews, nips, herds anything moving (or not).

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post #33 of 44 Old 03-22-2013, 03:38 PM
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Originally Posted by ChristineNJ View Post
I'm not a dog hater...I have owned German Shepards but I have heard way too many stories about pit bulls turning on other dogs, people, & children. Would never want to own one or even live next door to one.
I agree and I'm sure they're nice if they know you it's the poor sucker that they don't know or the dog that's the innocent victim thar they decide to attack . A friend of mine was 1 of those people that said it's how the dog is raised and he swore his dogs were the best until 1 attacked him
And went for his throat the next day he put all of his dog down .this was a doggie in raised from birth and it hit by never had any problems than just snap 1 day
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post #34 of 44 Old 03-23-2013, 12:24 PM
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Tell the woman you mistakenly call it a pitbull when it's acturally a Staffordshire. They are almost identical but the Staffie, altho originally bred for bull fighting, was then bred to be loving family pets, tough enough to tussle with kids, short easy to maintain coat and they were bred for this for generations. It was long after the breed had been in the US that some fools decided to get the fighting temperment back into them. Of course this wasn't acceptable to the Staffie Registry so the dog became known as the American PitBull.
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post #35 of 44 Old 03-23-2013, 08:33 PM
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While I whole heartedly agree pitty's have gotten a bad rap just as other breeds have, buy I have noticed some breeds can be a little more aggressive despite having loving & responsible owners.

Of course each dog is an individual, and there's ALWAYS an exception. For example, my parents neighbors across the street are GREAT people and a few years ago got 2 german shephard puppies. Both my parents & their neighbors next door have horses. So the puppies have always been exposed to the horses and other kids.

The dogs have attempted to attack each one of our horses as they are being walked on the street. As well as trying to attack my daughter & the next door neighbors daughter as they were riding their bikes. And when I say trying to attack I mean the lunging at, teeth baring, growling behavior. If they ever figure out how to run past the invisible fence, something bad will happen.

The dogs don't behave this way with their own 'family', and I understand the behavior is them protecting the family. But they aren't just barking and chasing anyone passing, they are trying to get at any passer by.

The owners have been talked to about it, but are at a loss as to how to fix the problem (though I doubt they are all that concerned to be honest).

So from what I've seen (and this is JUST my opinion) while the breeds labeled 'aggressive' are just as great as the next breed, they do tend to be a little more reactive as a whole than other 'non-aggressive' breeds.

And if a pit or shephard or dobi, etc came along that met our families needs & personnality I'd gladly bring them home.

"Just because I don't do things your way, doesn't mean I don't have a clue"
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post #36 of 44 Old 03-23-2013, 09:54 PM
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I've met more vicious maltese terriers than german shepherds. Jussayin.
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post #37 of 44 Old 03-23-2013, 10:26 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dlpark2 View Post
I always say that no puppy is born aggressive. The problem with pit bulls and other bully breeds is that they require attention and need jobs to do. Similar to a border collie, they easily get bored. They are strong, overpowering dogs and those cute puppies grow quick, and when they become bothersome adults, they get banished to the yard, chained to trees with heavy logging chains, and fed once a day. You chain me to a tree and pay me no attention, when I finally break loose, I am going to be looking for blood too. In the 80's it was a different dog that was dangerous. I wish people would quit blaming the breed and start blaming the owners. Dogs require obediance, training, and love. They are pack animals and just want to be part of a pack with an effective alpha who will keep them safe and fed.
I have definitely met puppies who were aggressive as puppies. He was supposed to be a barn dog so every measure was taken to socialize his well since day one. Even as a pup the he would attack my model citizen rottie. I stopped bringing my dog around because I didn't want to take the change of the pup doing any damage physically or mentally. He was sent back to the "breeder" (and I use that term lightly!) to fix him. He comes back, another woman brings her dog down for a play date and someone just lets the aggressive dog go and BAM ... I'm elbow deep in a dog fight . Not cool.
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post #38 of 44 Old 03-23-2013, 11:51 PM
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Excuse my typos... I was distracted with school work. It should say DOGS who were aggressive as puppies. Challenge should be risk
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post #39 of 44 Old 03-24-2013, 09:23 PM
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It Is The Owner

I so agree. The owner is the one that channels a dogs ability to either be friendly with animals and humans or to be a biter. I have had many experiences with many different breeds ( I once worked as a vet tech) and pits are as sweet as their enviornment. I have been attacked by little dogs many times.The little ones do not have the jaw power to hurt. Well good luck on your endevor to advoacte for pits.
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post #40 of 44 Old 03-25-2013, 01:49 PM
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Pits are used to fighting because they are very loyal to there owners. Whether they are beat not fed or left outside, owner says fight or protect me dog does it! We have a pb and she is my 9 year olds dog. My daughter has put her thou a lot of crap, she sits on her and drags her around etc. She is also a 4H dog and one of the lazyist dog I know! Would I want a pb next door to me, sure I would just have to watch my chickens. After all a dog is a dog , oh we also have cats inside and outside along with another dog and she is scared of the horses! No worries about my daughter abusing her I keep my eye on things, so no bad replies please.
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