When to spay?! Oh I am soooo confused please help - Page 2
   

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When to spay?! Oh I am soooo confused please help

This is a discussion on When to spay?! Oh I am soooo confused please help within the Other Pets forums, part of the Life Beyond Horses category

     
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        09-16-2008, 02:41 PM
      #11
    Showing
    My male dog I had done at around 8 months. I didn't know they could do it at 4m that seems a little young. It was before he started hiking his leg. I remember that much cause he still squats.
    He never "marks" like my intact male does. He is more agressive so the "myth" that it makes them calmer is hooey. I guess it comes down to the individual dog.
    I know my female, there is no way I would want to wait till after one heat season if I wasn't going to breed. Again just the mess factor. Can't leave them outside because they attract unwanted males. So she has to stay in the house with a diaper on. Yuck
         
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        09-16-2008, 02:57 PM
      #12
    Super Moderator
    My sweet sweet Anna was a rescue. I had her for nearly 2 years before I had to put her down a couple weeks ago. She was never fixed and by the time I got her, she was 9 years old and already had some masses forming. I feel very strongly that if you are not going to breed, a female should be fixed asap. The vet said those masses are caused by her having too much estrogen being produced during her heat cycles and with there being nowhere for it to go, so it formed huge masses in her mammories. Some where benign, in the end, some where not. It was the most devastating decision I have had to make.... Don't know if that helps you make your decision or not. (She had been bred before I got her)....
         
        09-16-2008, 03:59 PM
      #13
    Weanling
    Cat has it right-follow your vets advise-the pros of spaying or neutering far outweigh any cons-your pet will likely live longer, be healthier and be a whole lot less trouble!!
         
        09-16-2008, 06:22 PM
      #14
    Foal
    I think everyone took my concern a little differently than I was expecting, I was never planning on not getting her spayed, just didn't know what age I was going to do it. But I have researched & from advise from a good breeder I am going to let her have her first season then get her spayed about 3/4 weeks after. My vet said 5 months I think that is too young for any animal, she only did that cause I mentioned the entire male on the property.
         
        09-16-2008, 06:31 PM
      #15
    Foal
    Some info off a thread that helped me come to my decision if anyone is interested

    "My contracts are simple , our pups are not to be spayed until they have had one season. They can come in as early as 6 months or as in the case of the Raptors they are 2 and only one has had a true season. This cements the growth of the "back end" the risk of potty accidents and leaking post spay are reduced. I will not give full gaurantee health wise to a pup spayed before the first season. I request in our contract they go to the vet when they have the first season allowing him to check and document it then wait until the season is over. The girl is back to "normal" and then and only then can you spay her within our contract. It has done our girls well, they are spayed on schedule , the owner deals with one season and normally Never wants to deal with one again ! To date no leaky girls and everyone is happy. Our boys must wait till 12 - 18 months , when the chest has dropped and the muscle tone is optimum but before they begin acting like Jr Studs.

    Best of luck and Thank goodness you are so very concerned about the future health of your girl!"

    "3-4 weeks after her first season.... her anatomy has had a chance to function more than 3/4 s of the way intended. Things "tighten" up after that. Any longer and you chance a split heat ... not necessary. As soon as she presents cleanly take her in and have her tests run and her spay done. Intact females have much higher rates of leaking, hormonal disorders and breast cancer altered females have a significantly lowered ratio to all of these. I can get the studies if you need to read them , after nearly 30 years in RRs I have them nearly memorized."
         
        09-16-2008, 09:25 PM
      #16
    Cat
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by KiwiRyder
    I think everyone took my concern a little differently than I was expecting, I was never planning on not getting her spayed, just didn't know what age I was going to do it. But I have researched & from advise from a good breeder I am going to let her have her first season then get her spayed about 3/4 weeks after. My vet said 5 months I think that is too young for any animal, she only did that cause I mentioned the entire male on the property.
    I didn't read any response that assumed that you were not getting her spayed - so your first comment makes me wonder did you actually read the responses. And from the rest of what you wrote - it looks like you already had your answer before you asked. So why bother?
         
        09-18-2008, 12:37 PM
      #17
    Trained
    I had a female golden retriever that had her first heat cycle at 6 months. She also ended up prego because I didn't realize that they could go into heat so early. Guess the neighborhood boyz figured it out before I did.

    I would follow your vets advice. IF you don't trust him seek a second opinion from another qualified vet.
         
        09-18-2008, 01:09 PM
      #18
    Super Moderator
    The other scary thing is... you don't always figure out they are in heat right away....... so.....
         
        09-19-2008, 12:02 AM
      #19
    Banned
    I had my dog spayed when she was about four months old. No problems and I believe it was the smartest choice I ever made. I personally don't believe that spaying before their first heat affects their growth in any way or that it will harm them, especially if done by a experianced vet.
         
        09-24-2008, 06:00 PM
      #20
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Cat
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by KiwiRyder
    I think everyone took my concern a little differently than I was expecting, I was never planning on not getting her spayed, just didn't know what age I was going to do it. But I have researched & from advise from a good breeder I am going to let her have her first season then get her spayed about 3/4 weeks after. My vet said 5 months I think that is too young for any animal, she only did that cause I mentioned the entire male on the property.
    I didn't read any response that assumed that you were not getting her spayed - so your first comment makes me wonder did you actually read the responses. And from the rest of what you wrote - it looks like you already had your answer before you asked. So why bother?
    I agree. I don't think anyone was going to change her mind; it had already been made, which makes you wonder why she even asked. However, if you are interested, here is information from a veterinary schools study on early vs late spay and neuter that showed early spay / neuter to be not only safer, but easier on dogs when done early:

    "These studies report that anesthetizing 6- to 7-week-old puppies and kittens was uneventful. Spays are reported to be easier and faster at 6 to 7 weeks than at 6 to 7 months because there is little subcutaneous fat to hinder entrance to the abdominal cavity and the lack of vasculature reduces hemorrhage. Finding organs was no harder than on the older animal. The speed of castrations at 6 to 7 weeks and at 6 to 7 months is the same, and the testicles are easier to remove and break down. Finally, the younger animals recovered faster and with less pain. "

    "These studies indicate that early spays benefit the animal, the owner, animal population control, and you, the veterinarian. The animal benefits because the anesthesia is fast and uneventful; surgical procedure is well tolerated and animals recover faster. If made part of the standard puppy/kitten vaccination program, it would also benefit owners by decreasing the number of veterinary office visits necessary upon acquiring a new pet. This convenience to owners would lead to increased compliance on their part and thereby decrease the number of unwanted dogs and cats produced each year. The veterinarian benefits because spays and neuters at 6 to 7 weeks of age are easier and faster than at 6 to 7 months, they help reduce animal overpopulation, and higher owner compliance means more business. It also gives veterinarians the opportunity to interact with shelters, pet stores, and breeders and be seen as leaders in animal welfare in our communities. "

    Taken from:

    http://vetmed.illinois.edu/ope/ivb/spay-neu.htm
         
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