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homeschooling? tell me about it please :)

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        07-08-2014, 01:51 PM
      #21
    Foal
    I was homeschooled the whole way, and I loved it. I'm in college now, and far more prepared and adaptable than many of my peers.

    Is homeschooling ideal? No—I've yet to see a method of raising and educating kids that brings the best results every time. You're going to make mistakes. Things aren't going to be perfect for your kids either way. So why homeschool? My parents gave me a well-rounded education; more so than even most other home schooled kids. I played piano and guitar, sang, learned to paint, read books like crazy, gardened, cooked, baked, taught myself dog training (and actually made a bit of money at it), needlework, horseback riding … those were just the extra-curriculars, of course ;) I aced Chemistry 151 in college, because my high school curriculum was harder. I speak Spanish and a little French. My poems have won awards in college.

    Not all homeschoolers are well-adapted, well-socialized people. But of the literally hundreds of homeschooled kids I know, only a handful are the repressed, rule-bound, maladjusted type. Of my homeschool friends who've attended college, not one has failed to adjust, adapt, and function as a "normal" human being.

    Do we miss out on some of the things public and private schooled kids do? Yes. Sure, we have homeschool proms and dances, but not as many as others. Yes, we have choir, but it only meets once a week. We have co-ops and sports teams, but again, not as often or as prolific as other schooling methods. And all of these extra-curricular perks vary with location. BUT we also miss out on the drugs, the sex, the abuse, the bullying, etc., that is more of a risk in some public schools (notice I said "more of a risk"—public schools can be as safe as my homeschool environment, and homeschool environments can be as dangerous as some public schools).

    As I've entered "real-life", adult life, I've noticed that we really never spend large amounts of time with our peers. The public schooled kids I know, in general, have a harder time adjusting to interactions with "others"—professors, work supervisors, younger friends, mentees, etc. Again, "in general".

    In the end, it's all in the way you do it. I know of some really, really great public schools. I know some really atrocious ones, too. I've been in private schools that are more repressive than the majority of homeschools. And there are some really horrible homeschool situations.

    But, I plan to homeschool my children, when (hopefully!) I have some of my own. In the meantime, I'm studying to be an English/lit teacher, because I love literature and I want to teach others the love of writing. OP, if you do homeschool, take it one day at a time. That's how my mom did it. She didn't think ahead to the frightening prospect of chemistry and bio lab. She just started at the beginning—teaching us how to read, to count. History and social science were saved until we were 4th or 5th grade, and then we learned such things from biographies and field trips. Her main focus was reading, writing, math. And then we played, we created. My three siblings and I soaked it up, learning more on our own—through supervised, educational play and good books—than we could have through textbooks and tests and lectures. As we approached high school, she mixed in science, pursuing co-ops with retired professors for the "harder" subjects. Except it never seemed harder to us: it was just the next level of learning. And we're good at teaching ourselves. Classrooms with poor teachers haven't bothered me in college, because I'll pick up the book, I'll do the research, and I'll teach myself.

    I hope this helps in making your decision :)
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        07-08-2014, 01:56 PM
      #22
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by DIYHorsemanship    
    Endiku mentioned teasing. I never really got teased (not saying you won't though) In fact alot of the kids that were public schooled I talked to wished they were homeshcooled.
    This has been my experience much of the time with peers, but with adults it's a different story, lol!!! When I was four or five, a school teacher at my church found out Mom was planning on homeschooling me, and she got mad. I remember her staring into my face and demanding that I count upwards by twos. I made it to 260 before she finally decided I wasn't messed up ;) A lot of professors are initially skeptical … until they see a test score or an essay. One felt the need to talk me through everything as if I were in preschool. Standardized testing was always interesting as well. A homeschooled friend was pulled aside before a PSAT and told, "This is a desk, and this is a chair. You set the chair by the desk …" We had a good laugh about that one
         
        07-08-2014, 02:29 PM
      #23
    Teen Forum Moderator
    Testing people from public schools are rather hilarious when they find out you're homeschooled. For my PSAT, I had one demand my student ID even after I'd told her that I was homeschooled and brought my Texas ID instead, because clearly homeschoolers couldn't look like me. (Typical teenager I'd say...Converse, skinny jeans, T shirt, and makeup.) At my first SAT, I was put in a 'special' homeschoolers room to, as the woman put it, 'be with my cute little homeschool buddies so I didn't feel scared." For the record I didn't know any of them....there are thousands of homeschooling families in my city, and no one seems to realize we don't all know each other. Then, at my second SAT, they messed up the room that I was in and I had to be walked by a supervisor to another room. As we were walking, she felt obligated to inform me that their public school ran flawlessly until kids like me (home schooled, presumably) 'threw a wrench in their system.' She proceeded to tell me that I ought to just go home and get back into my pajamas. I couldn't believe that a grown adult with a job such as hers would say something like that. I was more amused than anything, though. She can think what she wants to think, but I made a 2010 on my highest SAT score, and I am both dyslexic and dyscalculate. You can't argue with my numbers.

    So actually, I'd have to agree with Little Jane. Most of the ridicule doesn't come from the kids at all. It comes from the adults who are too ignorant to realize that just because we weren't schooled their way doesn't mean we're defective. Many adults seem to think that to be homeschooled, the kid must either be a super genius with snooty parents, or a public school reject who can't survive the 'stresses' of public school. Most of the kids I've met are either indifferent or mildly curious about my schooling situation. I've never had one say anything near the cruel things that adults have said to me. If anything they think that I must be really smart. (I'm not, but I WAS taught to be self motivated and to think for myself.)

    In my college classes, I have yet to have anyone care or suspect that I'm homeschooled. I can do anything that anyone else can, and I always finish at the top of the class. I often take leadership roles even though everyone is a year or two older than I am, and I can socialize just as well as anyone else. I have a job now with a boss who adores me (and whom I adore), and I've never had one tell me that any of the problems I face are because of how I was schooled.
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        07-08-2014, 02:39 PM
      #24
    cnm
    Foal
    I and all of my brothers and sisters were/are homeschooled (there are nine of us). The four oldest ones, myself included, also attended public school - my brother and sister in middle school and a sister and I in high school.

    From my experience....

    Pros of homeschooling:

    1) I felt that the education I received at home was far superior to anything that I learned in public school. My mother started all of us out teaching us herself and transitioned later on into a video based teaching system. After the 8th grade my parents made the decision to allow us to go to public school. There was a series of tests that we had to take prior to enrolling so that the school would be able to determine what grade we tested out in and where to place us. I tested out as eligible to be enrolled in the 11th grade based on academics. My parents chose to only advance me one year and I entered the public school system in the 10th grade. My brothers and sisters had similar testing experiences. I did not learn much that I had not already been exposed to in the regular academic classes over the next three years of schooling.

    2) My parents were able to be more involved with us and help to instil in us the morals and work ethic that they lived by. After I was enrolled in public school, I realized that a much lower standard was what was acceptable by society and that public school environment definitely gave me more opportunities without any supervision to "get away with things" that my parents never found out about - long story short, they couldn't be as involved because their knowledge of my everyday life was severely diminished.

    3) Just being at home and around family helped us to have a strong knit family unit. We could have every meal together, sit down for family discussions, and really be a support system for each other. The schedule could be flexible as well, allowing us to take family vacations and work around scheduling conflicts more easily without missing out on school and learning.

    Cons of homeschooling:

    1) Socialization was the biggest con. I still feel as though it is more difficult for me to be comfortable in social situations even though I am now 31 years old and because of the military, school, moving around, and now my job which is community service oriented I have been exposed to a lot. I believe that interactions in a social setting outside of the direct family unit are very important to helping a child develop an ability to deal appropriately with living in society. My other adult brothers and sisters have experienced some of the same challenges with being uncomfortable with people outside the family and I believe that it can be attributed to the lack of socialization while we were young. That being said, there are many more options than there used to be for socializing home school kids. Many schools will allow home schooled kids to be enrolled in their sports programs, there are gym sessions for home schoolers at many YMCA'a, and local intramural sports teams don't typically discriminate against home schoolers. If not sports, churches also seem to have more youth programs now then there used to be.

    The social aspect seemed to affect the boys more than the girls for whatever reason. My brother was picked on mercilessly when he went into public school in middle school. Us girls did not experience anything quite that extreme, although making friends was not something that came easily to us. After two years of public school, my brother begged my mother to home school him again and he finished his education as a home schooler.

    2) Work. My mother has sacrificed so much to raise us and has been a teacher from kindergarden all the way up through 12th grade. As the kids got older she actually had to take some of the classes as well so that she could help them along in their studies! The amount of work involved to make homeschooling worthwhile academically is tremendous. There are extra requirements that differ by state, such as keeping daily logs, constructing yearly portfolios of work completed, and a standardized testing process and meetings with a state certified counselor/advisor.

    3) Opportunity for extra classes outside of basic academics. When I went to public school I was enrolled in an art class and really excelled there. I also got to run track and play soccer for the high school team. Although my mother was a great teacher and support system, the problem with learning the majority of things from one person is that every person has strong points and weak points. If you have more than one teacher that specializes in their particular field of study, you have the opportunity to be more well rounded and experience more. This is not to say that my parents could not have enrolled me in sports or art classes in the community where I could have experienced the same thing, just that the opportunity for that is there at public school.

    Anyway, this is just from my experiences for whatever it is worth .

    By the way, both of my homeschooled sisters now have kids and have made the decision to homeshool them as well because of their experience with it.

    Hope this helps!
    Celeste and ErinaStars like this.
         
        07-09-2014, 04:21 PM
      #25
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by lovebearsall    
    I see you have already had so many positive responses (and I didn't get back in this thread yesterday). I'll keep mine short. In my area, there are homeschool "groups". If you want your kids to play with other kids, look for a group. Honestly, what concerns you about "socialization" was the exact reason I chose to homeschool in the first place. I was terrified of putting my kids in a situation (public school) where they would be bullied (by teachers and students), filled with morals that were counter to those we teach them at home, and of course put in harms way (all the school shootings).

    Agree with you all the way on that! Those are some of the reasons Dad and Mom decided to homeschool my siblings and I.
         
        07-09-2014, 04:51 PM
      #26
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Endiku    
    Testing people from public schools are rather hilarious when they find out you're homeschooled. For my PSAT, I had one demand my student ID even after I'd told her that I was homeschooled and brought my Texas ID instead, because clearly homeschoolers couldn't look like me. (Typical teenager I'd say...Converse, skinny jeans, T shirt, and makeup.) At my first SAT, I was put in a 'special' homeschoolers room to, as the woman put it, 'be with my cute little homeschool buddies so I didn't feel scared." For the record I didn't know any of them....there are thousands of homeschooling families in my city, and no one seems to realize we don't all know each other. Then, at my second SAT, they messed up the room that I was in and I had to be walked by a supervisor to another room. As we were walking, she felt obligated to inform me that their public school ran flawlessly until kids like me (home schooled, presumably) 'threw a wrench in their system.' She proceeded to tell me that I ought to just go home and get back into my pajamas. I couldn't believe that a grown adult with a job such as hers would say something like that. I was more amused than anything, though. She can think what she wants to think, but I made a 2010 on my highest SAT score, and I am both dyslexic and dyscalculate. You can't argue with my numbers.

    So actually, I'd have to agree with Little Jane. Most of the ridicule doesn't come from the kids at all. It comes from the adults who are too ignorant to realize that just because we weren't schooled their way doesn't mean we're defective. Many adults seem to think that to be homeschooled, the kid must either be a super genius with snooty parents, or a public school reject who can't survive the 'stresses' of public school. Most of the kids I've met are either indifferent or mildly curious about my schooling situation. I've never had one say anything near the cruel things that adults have said to me. If anything they think that I must be really smart. (I'm not, but I WAS taught to be self motivated and to think for myself.)

    In my college classes, I have yet to have anyone care or suspect that I'm homeschooled. I can do anything that anyone else can, and I always finish at the top of the class. I often take leadership roles even though everyone is a year or two older than I am, and I can socialize just as well as anyone else. I have a job now with a boss who adores me (and whom I adore), and I've never had one tell me that any of the problems I face are because of how I was schooled.


    Wow.... Thanks for sharing!
         
        08-08-2014, 01:45 AM
      #27
    Trained
    When dd was coming of school age, we lived in a very rural area with no private school. She could read by age 2, and read well beyond 1st grade by age 4. So, I intended to homeschool. It is a big commitment. However, the question then becomes how well you can teach? I tutored people in college for extra money, and I enjoyed it. And from that I figured I would be a fantastic teacher - although I had no experience teaching small children. I started teaching her when she started reading (which she started doing on her own). I am here to tell you that teaching a small child, and doing so effectively (which includes - they enjoy it), is one of the more challenging things one can embark on. I soon realized I wasn't fantastic at it - to put it mildly, and had to study up on it. I also bought a lot of educational software that was well designed. The good software is really worth it. I got a ball mouse to make it easier for her then small hands.

    DD was accepted to kindergarten a year early. She did not want to be homeschooled; she really wanted to go to school and be with other kids (we lived in a pretty isolated area on a farm w no neighbor kids to play with). Kindergarten was only half a day, but when it came to first grade I told her, and she understood, that we would review her school work and I would augment her education with additional lessons until we could move somewhere that she could attend a private school. Luckily, they had an awesome GATE program that she was in until we were able to move.

    The reason I "checked her work" was that public school educators are /were so bad that they would give a 100% "grade" and a smiley face to incorrect work. Kids know this and will get lazy so they can go play or whatnot. I have little good to say about public schools, in general.

    I really think the child should want to be homeschooled and the parent should be able to teach. If not, IMO, one should send their child to a good private school - whatever it takes. DD had her pick of Universities, entered college with sophomore standing from AP class credit, and is a now straight A student w a hard science major at a well recognized University. If she had gone to a public school, K-12, she would not have been challenged, trust me.

    Many of DD's friends in HS were homeschooled through middle school. They were perfectly well adjusted and academically capable from the start (freshman year).
         
        08-08-2014, 08:38 AM
      #28
    Weanling
    Although homeschooling was at one time, only for the ones who had no other option as no school would take them, it is now an excellent option. With the poor discipline and raising of todays young, I applaud any parent, who takes on this. I have friends, who homeschooled all 3 of their children and all of them are very successful adults. All of them finished college and went on to be productive members of society.
    I am fortunate enough to be able to afford a private school for my girls. I will not tolerate poorly mannered / behaved children. Basically, if it wasnt acceptable to do back in the 1950's , its not acceptable now either.
    You can check with your local 4H . Ours has a homeschool group, where they can have activities and parents can help each other. Some states have approved online learning too. That gives you the benefit of a teacher when needed.
    You do need to check with the laws of your state, but most have gone to a more favorable view of this. I do believe they are finally seeing that the "new way" of raising kids , just flat out didnt work and now are trying to salvage the ones they can by offering this option.
         
        08-12-2014, 10:42 PM
      #29
    Foal
    I was homeschooled my whole life, so cannot compare homeschooling and going to school, but I really feel the success of homeschooling depends both on the child and the parents. My parents were not proactive - my dad wasn't involved in our schooling at all, and my mum was unmotivated and complacent. When I got to about grade 5 I simply did not want to do schoolwork any more, and my parents didn't really force me. Because I didn't do much schoolwork over the next few years, I assumed that I was stupid, if the subject of me going to school came up I dismissed it because I thought I would have to go in a class well under my age because I'd missed so much.

    We also had little socialisation, only church and sometimes home school get-togethers. I'm naturally an introverted sort of person, but I really believe that the lack of socialisation has hindered me, both in social skills and confidence. During my teens I was depressed a lot because I didn't have any friends and could never do anything (we lived out of town).

    It wasn't all bad of course, and I do think some parts have benefited me. My summary of how I feel about homeschooling is that it's good if it gives the child more opportunities to do and try more things, they can still have regular social interactions with children their own age, and if the parents are dedicated to their learning. Having said that, I've known kids that really hated being homeschooled and kids that have thrived on it, so its all about the individual and their needs really. Being set in one mindset (like my parents were - "I must homeschool my children") is not healthy for anyone. Obviously I know that my situation was probably not normal, and I even plan to homeschool any children I might have, at least for the first few years.
         
        08-12-2014, 11:41 PM
      #30
    Weanling
    This is purely coming from an admittedly uninformed individual , but.....

    1). It would seem like when you are at school, you are at home and vice versa. One would just flow into the other. How do you separate those environments.
    2). If you spend all day with your "teacher", don't you have a great desire to cleave class and go home rather than already be home.
    3). Without meaning to disparage the parents, are they really capable to teach and manage the daily items of the home
    4). No matter what is said, it seems you would really miss having school companions of either sex

    I apparently don't understand the attraction or the benefits of life that is gained.
    I'm not being difficult, but it truly don't understand it.

    Enlighten me as to the advantages over a so called normal path.

    Thanks
         

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