School: Legal? - Page 4
   

       The Horse Forum > Life Beyond Horses > Parenting

School: Legal?

This is a discussion on School: Legal? within the Parenting forums, part of the Life Beyond Horses category

    Like Tree38Likes

     
    LinkBack Thread Tools
        02-12-2014, 12:54 PM
      #31
    Green Broke
    Piggybacking off of Koolio's latest post, I also don't think it's a teacher's job to hold a child's hand through everything. They cannot force someone to pay attention, or turn in their work, or succeed. And some point the student needs to take it upon themselves.

    Corazon--With Universities, there are many instances where simply nothing can be done x.x I had to withdraw 20 credits worth of classes with three weeks in the semester to go because of my accident.
         
    Sponsored Links
    Advertisement
     
        02-12-2014, 11:26 PM
      #32
    Showing
    Koolio, in our elementary school gr 1-8, we had a male teacher that was horrid to the low income kids. He made the mistake of grabbing my son and slamming him into the wall. My son was not a trouble maker nor a big kid. He was one of the smaller ones. He was always polite. When I learned of this a letter went to the school board demanding disciplinary action or they would face a lawsuit. Our principal was a drunk who imbibed on the job. The outcome? A teacher was sent to monitor this teacher on a daily basis until school let out in June. He didn't return but another school got him and same old crap again.
         
        02-13-2014, 12:10 AM
      #33
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Saddlebag    
    Koolio, in our elementary school gr 1-8, we had a male teacher that was horrid to the low income kids. He made the mistake of grabbing my son and slamming him into the wall. My son was not a trouble maker nor a big kid. He was one of the smaller ones. He was always polite. When I learned of this a letter went to the school board demanding disciplinary action or they would face a lawsuit. Our principal was a drunk who imbibed on the job. The outcome? A teacher was sent to monitor this teacher on a daily basis until school let out in June. He didn't return but another school got him and same old crap again.
    Stories like these are disheartening because they get so much attention overshadowing and negating the amazing work and that the majority of teachers and schools do for kids every day.

    The really, really sad thing is that many stories start with kids who enjoy the art of exaggeration. I am not saying this is what happened in your case, but I experience the creative extensions students add to even the most mundane situations every single day.

    If a teacher physically abuses a child by forcefully slamming a kid into a locker, this is a criminal offence and should be treated as such. It is too bad a security camera didn't catch the incident on tape. As a teacher, I support cameras in every hallway and in every classroom. This is as much for my own protection as it is for the kids. I think the public should be able to see exactly what goes on in schools.

    How do you know the principal was a drunk. Did you personally witness him drinking alcohol at school, or did you witness him as being under the influence at school? Did you inform the school board office and lodge a formal complaint?
    Chiilaa and Foxtail Ranch like this.
         
        02-13-2014, 07:59 AM
      #34
    Showing
    I was angry over a previous incident. His door was open and I walked in. He had a large bottle of dark rum he was pouring into a tea cup. He hastily put the bottle in a bottom drawer. Plus his breath always smelled of it. The teacher liked to dehumanize the lower income kids and there was always one he'd pick on the entire year. My son was the one. The next year his teacher was incredible, the kids were happy and tried their hearts out for him. The school lost him after two years because he was offered vice principal at another school. When the school board took action, numerous parents approached me and told of how their child had been treated, yet no one had done anything.
         
        02-14-2014, 07:13 PM
      #35
    Green Broke
    I have a lot more faith in teachers than a lot of you do. I've never really been treated badly by one. There have been some I really don't like and who aren't nice, but if you made an appointment with your parents, and you all turned up clean and polite and handled the situation with respect and consideration I do not know one teacher that wouldn't help. Of course if you're rude, or unkind straight up most wouldn't help at all. Of course, there will be some bad teachers out there.

    To be honest though, I do get where all of this is coming from. Up to year 10, everything is "negotiable" to an extent, but in the last two years there are set ways that things are done. Exact percentages of classes that must be attended. Procedures for missed examinations. If someone is sick and falls outside of these set things... well that's tough. It really is, but sometimes people are too sick to complete the year. Sometimes people just haven't attended enough, and if the teacher feels that they cannot pass a student based on what the student has done, that's the teachers prerogative.

    If the school is really that bad that they deliberately aren't helping, well it's up to the parents to find a better school.
    Koolio and Foxtail Ranch like this.
         
        02-15-2014, 09:12 AM
      #36
    Yearling
    It seems to me that smaller schools in small towns have more of a problem with teachers than the bigger schools. I would think it is because of financial problems (which is what happened to our school), and they can't afford some of the really good teachers. And the really good teachers know they are really good teachers, so they accept jobs where, of course, there is more money, especially since, at least in the US, teaching is not a job that pays particularly well (though it should be!).
         
        02-15-2014, 09:51 AM
      #37
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Corazon Lock    
    It seems to me that smaller schools in small towns have more of a problem with teachers than the bigger schools. I would think it is because of financial problems (which is what happened to our school), and they can't afford some of the really good teachers. And the really good teachers know they are really good teachers, so they accept jobs where, of course, there is more money, especially since, at least in the US, teaching is not a job that pays particularly well (though it should be!).
    I assume it is very different in the US. In my district, and across the province, teachers are payed the same regardless of the school size or location. Pay is awarded according to years of education and years of experience. I love teaching in smaller communities. I feel I can get to know the kids and their parents much better and that parents are much more involved and hold their kids more accountable for their learning.
         
        02-15-2014, 06:26 PM
      #38
    Yearling
    Koolio,
    Yeah, it's a little different in the US. Small schools, at least in Iowa, get minimal funding if any if the school enrollment is below 300. It is like they are trying to make bigger schools. You don't get paid as much in a smaller school. You must be more well rounded because it is possible you may be teaching more than one subject. Yet, you get less pay. Years of experience DO matter, but a smaller school has a harder time accommodating for that. So you get the teachers fresh out of college, which is a 50/50 situation, or the ones that usually cannot get hired in other places. There are few applicants, so just about anyone can get hired.

    But, like you, I like the smallness of the district and getting more one-on-one with kids and parents.
         
        02-17-2014, 05:50 PM
      #39
    Yearling
    Koolio, I live in Oregon. Here, small schools get a little more money for each student, but there are other challenges as a small school.

    *Most families need two incomes to survive, and there are fewer jobs in small towns, so its hard to get a teacher to move there when their spouse can't find work.

    *The feds require "Highly Qualified" teachers for each subject from 6-12 grades, and its hard to fully employ an HQ Spanish teacher, for example, unless they are HQ in some other area, which many are not.

    *Keeping instruction at a high level can be challenging in a small community where the political battle to reprimand staff and students has a significant backlash. Admin are not allowed to respond to specifics because it is protected and private information (rightly so), but the other side can share all they want (true or not).

    *Smaller schools cost more per student because they cannot spread out the costs as much as larger schools can. Many small schools and districts in Oregon used to get money from the state from the timber industry, but that is all gone now. Other than providing online instruction with tutoring, or becoming a charter (which only provides 3 years of cash, and then its gone), there are few solutions out there. Some of our small districts have begun to board foreign students as a source of income.

    *Pay for teachers is less than urban districts because small schools have to stretch their dollars. The lower cost of living out in country should help that, but as I said above, most families nowadays need two incomes.

    I too LOVE small schools and districts! I like being able to work with kids as a small community, where you can have older students mentor younger students, and get all students involved in the care and image of their school. It just comes with challenges as I have listed above.
         
        02-18-2014, 01:21 AM
      #40
    Green Broke
    My kids attend a tiny, rural school (40 kids per grade bused in from 4 towns). We aren't lacking for funding.... because it's a Title One School. We have Art Teachers, Music Teachers, Coaches for every sport, we even have HELO (higher education learning opportunities) Classes that include snacks, busing, materials and so on and are 100% free and held after school in subject such as Art, Cake Decorating, Karate, Yoga, Hunters Safety and so on.

    Sports are $30 ($20 for the second, $10 for the third) and that includes uniforms, busing to all games and so on.

    I can't keep up with the number of paid TA's that are everywhere.

    Pretty much the only thing our schools don't have is a real Honors program. Since it's not realistic to create a separate class for something like 4 kids, they just bump kids up a grade if they are ahead. So my 7th grader has half 7th grade classes and half 8th grade which in reality, I think is better. Not quite sure what we'll do come High School when she'll need to be in college classes but we'll figure it out.

    The large school she used to attend when we lived in a giant city told me my child didn't qualify for their Honors program because they tested her IQ and she was 3 points too low. So she sat around bored and learning nothing.

    Oh and it's difficult to get hired as a teacher in our schools. My neighbor has multiple degrees and ended up going to another district. I'm thrilled with our tiny schools.
    Koolio and Foxtail Ranch like this.
         

    « Ugh.. | Barn guilt »
    Thread Tools

    Similar Threads
    Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
    Old school vs New school Horsemanship Shropshirerosie Jokes and Funnies 2 11-22-2013 01:44 PM
    Legal Help Caine Horse Boarding 3 09-21-2013 03:40 PM
    Is this legal? Beauseant Horse Talk 5 12-10-2011 10:04 PM
    is this 'legal'...? alexischristina Horse Shows 33 04-27-2010 01:55 AM
    School Master or School Mistress wanted takeoffyourcolours Horses for Sale 0 08-01-2009 09:01 AM



    All times are GMT -4. The time now is 02:45 PM.


    Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
    Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
    Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0