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Am i too overweight to ride?

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  • Am i to overweight to ride
  • Am i overweight to ride

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    12-02-2012, 01:19 PM
  #21
Trained
So then 20% all day trotting and cantering isn't right? Maybe it's 15%?
     
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    12-02-2012, 01:23 PM
  #22
Super Moderator
Quote:
Originally Posted by Golden Horse    
So then 20% all day trotting and cantering isn't right? Maybe it's 15%?

Common sense and individual to horse and rider, other than a general "beware" at 20% , the rest cannot be put into exact numbers. It is a rule of thumb and should be considered with all the other factors that don't fit into neat numbers and formula.
montcowboy likes this.
     
    12-02-2012, 01:28 PM
  #23
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zubiedoobydoo    
There is another factor nobody is considering, besides the comfort of the horse, and that's the safety of the rider. I have put on a lot of weight and can feel my balance is not as good as at my proper weight. Overweight riders have a much higher center of gravity as the extra weight is disproportionally at or above the waist making a person top-heavy.
Again, this is a person-to-person assessment, not across the board as far as weight distribution. We are all top heavy when riding anyway and we all can and do learn to compensate for that. What about a thin woman with a large bust? She's not top-heavy? Ya, tell a few of my friends that. I definitely agree that athletic ability is reduced when overweight. How much it's reduced is again a person-to-person situtation.

Quote:
I have several thousand dollars of vet bills from a state veterinary hospital proving that irreparable damage can exist in a horse who was injured from overloading, even when a well respected trainer, the experts who frequent his barn, my own vet and a vet chiro could not find an issue.
yet earlier in your post you say to consult the experts.

Quote:
The horse demonstrated no obvious signs of pain, she only refused to take her right lead in training. That was the only clue. She has an irrepairable stifle stress injury she will have for life.
So since your experts couldn't find this problem, how is this proof that the stifle injury had anything to do with weight? Could have been from poor riding, misstep, genetics, impact in the field unknown to you...

Quote:
So I am a little put off by those in this forum who are saying it's fine to overload a horse.
Nobody said that it's fine to overload a horse. What I said was that the 20% rule doesn't consider other factors. When I said "old" I should have elaborated. "Old" in that knowledgeable horse people don't use that rule as the do all and end all of choosing a horse to carry weight anymore. At one time, I believe we did but we have learned much since then.


To Endiku, I too would be interested to hear more about drafts that can't carry weight because they are designed to pull. IMO, no horse is designed to pull or designed to carry a rider. We have trained horses both mentally and physically to be capable of pulling or carrying. You can't have a draft horse that excels in pulling also excel at jumping, but you could train for either. Breed characteristics and individual conformation certainly play roles in how well any horse can perform a specific activity, but a 1400 lb draft horse can be fit-trained to carry 300lbs+ when properly loaded. Of course, that horse probably isn't going to gallop down the road for 5 miles either with that weight.
smrobs and NeuroticMare like this.
     
    12-02-2012, 03:06 PM
  #24
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Golden Horse    

Again, the study that you quote was looking at horses being ridden all day at trot and canter, and it makes sense to me that if you are going to be doing that then you need to maybe look at the weight ratio differently from an hour walking on the flat.

I don't know where you have suddenly popped up from, but this is a continuing discussion on this forum, and many others, and the only conclusion I have drawn is that when it comes to weight carrying the only answer is "It depends"
First off, I gave four separate sources, not a study on trotting.

Second, I don't need your permission to "pop up" and join in a forum.

These are not opinions, they are facts, research backed and firsthand experience. Can you back any of your opinions?

If you want a forum where everyone agrees with you, start your own and limit access to people who agree with you.
     
    12-02-2012, 03:12 PM
  #25
Foal
Can items be deleted?
     
    12-02-2012, 03:14 PM
  #26
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by NorthernMama    
Again, this is a person-to-person assessment, not across the board as far as weight distribution. We are all top heavy when riding anyway and we all can and do learn to compensate for that. What about a thin woman with a large bust? She's not top-heavy? Ya, tell a few of my friends that. I definitely agree that athletic ability is reduced when overweight. How much it's reduced is again a person-to-person situtation.

Yet earlier in your post you say to consult the experts.

So since your experts couldn't find this problem, how is this proof that the stifle injury had anything to do with weight? Could have been from poor riding, misstep, genetics, impact in the field unknown to you...

Nobody said that it's fine to overload a horse. What I said was that the 20% rule doesn't consider other factors. When I said "old" I should have elaborated. "Old" in that knowledgeable horse people don't use that rule as the do all and end all of choosing a horse to carry weight anymore. At one time, I believe we did but we have learned much since then.


To Endiku, I too would be interested to hear more about drafts that can't carry weight because they are designed to pull. IMO, no horse is designed to pull or designed to carry a rider. We have trained horses both mentally and physically to be capable of pulling or carrying. You can't have a draft horse that excels in pulling also excel at jumping, but you could train for either. Breed characteristics and individual conformation certainly play roles in how well any horse can perform a specific activity, but a 1400 lb draft horse can be fit-trained to carry 300lbs+ when properly loaded. Of course, that horse probably isn't going to gallop down the road for 5 miles either with that weight.
This is just rude of you. I have no desire to argue with people here. I am offering my input to this forum to the original poster, if you want to start attacking anyone with different input you need to get a life.
     
    12-02-2012, 03:21 PM
  #27
Showing
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zubiedoobydoo    
First off, I gave four separate sources, not a study on trotting.

Second, I don't need your permission to "pop up" and join in a forum.

These are not opinions, they are facts, research backed and firsthand experience. Can you back any of your opinions?

If you want a forum where everyone agrees with you, start your own and limit access to people who agree with you.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zubiedoobydoo    
This is just rude of you. I have no desire to argue with people here. I am offering my input to this forum to the original poster, if you want to start attacking anyone with different input you need to get a life.
Excuse me, you claim others are rude, then you post comments like that.

No one is attacking it seems but you, expressing opinions is fine, posting other people's opinion are fine.....

Telling others to start their own forum so they can express their opinions will not be tolerated, calling people <SNIP> will also not be tolerated.


.
kitten_Val and smrobs like this.
     
    12-02-2012, 03:56 PM
  #28
Showing
OP, like others have said, you are not too large to ride, it's just a matter of finding the correct horse to match your size and experience level. Also, the 20% rule, as others said, is more of a guideline. There are so many other factors to consider on top of that. If I have 2 horses, both weigh 1000 pounds, but one is 15hh but slight of bone and ill conformed with a long back and narrow chest, then that horse would be much less suited to carry the same amount of weight than the shorter horse with the short back, broad body, and heavy bone.

OP, generally speaking, if you are looking for a horse that will be able to carry heavier weights, then you need to look closely at conformation instead of breed, height, or even weight of the horse. Granted, you wouldn't want to buy a 700 pound Arab, but pretty much any horse that is over 1100 pounds with good conformation, big bones, good feet, and a short back should have no issue carrying you for whatever you want to do. Folks who do a lot more work on their horses and expect the horse to carry them all day long every day need to be more scrutinizing about not overloading the horse, but your average pleasure rider who only rides a few hours a week can get by with pushing the guidelines a bit.
     
    12-02-2012, 04:11 PM
  #29
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zubiedoobydoo    
First off, I gave four separate sources, not a study on trotting.
And where did I say a study on trotting? I said all day trotting and cantering

Link 1 quotes Ohio State University 2008, a study of 8 horses.
Link 2 quotes Oh guess who Ohio State University Agricultural Technical Institute
Link 3 States "A common formula, and no scientific research
Link 4 as an intro to its conclusion "How Much is Too Much?
So how much weight can a horse safely carry? "While there seems to be some consensus, it isn't as clear as one might think," says Wickler. There is no definitive answer largely because there is no way to define the limits of safety"[/QUOTE]

Quote:
Originally Posted by Zubiedoobydoo    
Second, I don't need your permission to "pop up" and join in a forum.
I was merely pointing out that this is a contentious subject and has been discussed many times, always suspicious of those who launch themselves on a controversial thread, you never know who they are or what agenda they bring.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Zubiedoobydoo    
These are not opinions, they are facts, research backed and firsthand experience. Can you back any of your opinions?
Great one research study of 8 horses and another of 7 horses, unless I misread.

I have been trying to find the source of the following, Heavier Riders' Guide which I have wanted to quote but was reluctant to, however a study of 374 competitive trail riding horses compared horse/rider weight relationships. They concluded that these horses can easily carry over 30% of their body weight for 100 miles and not only compete, but compete well, does sound better than studies of 7 horses.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Zubiedoobydoo    
If you want a forum where everyone agrees with you, start your own and limit access to people who agree with you.
I don't want everyone to agree with me, but neither does everyone have to agree with you, it is an open forum where we both can put our own views.
     
    12-02-2012, 05:44 PM
  #30
Super Moderator
Zubie, I modified your post to remove your rude reference to members of this forum. We have a strict etiquette policy that we ALL must abide by, or risk the consequences. If you feel that this forum is open to a "free for all" when it comes to posting, you came to the wrong place.
     

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