Not the horse for me... - Page 3 - The Horse Forum
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post #21 of 40 Old 05-21-2012, 01:20 PM
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Dixie, you NEED to trust your gut. Your horse is NOT your child. If, for WHATEVER reason, you are paying to keep a horse that cannot do what you bought that horse, your PROPERTY, to do, you are under no obligation to keep it. Further, this horse could fall over on you while rearing, a very real possibility. Even IF your health insurance covers your medical bills, your injuries could be permanent. We all take risks handling our horses bc of their size and strength. I am enjoying training my 6 yo's who are both making good progress, and they are both rideable. Ultimately, I am not happy just paying to keep my horse(s) as if they are big dogs. I want a horse to ride and school. I don't care if you don't want this, but it sounds as if you DID want a riding horse, and not a pasture pet. You know that you are not capable of retraining this horse, and you don't need to feel ashamed of that.
Get her ready for sale, be honest to the buyer, and post a wanted thread to see if somebody here has a good, honest horse for a beginner.
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post #22 of 40 Old 05-23-2012, 12:41 AM
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I agree with Corporal.

It's one thing to have a pasture pet when a horse is old or foundered. It's the right thing to do as payback for years of working for you.

But if a horse is young and rideable, she needs a job. It would be a shame to not ride her when there are probably many people that can.

A horse that would be terrifying for me to ride would be a breeze for my trainer. I guess what I'm saying is, keep her if you wish. But don't feel bad if you need to sell her with full disclosure about her issues.

I don't know where your level of riding is. I'm an advanced beginner. If there was a horse that my trainer couldn't handle, I'd know right then and there that I'd never be able to do. Definitely listen to your trainer and see what she tells you.

Another thing to keep in mind, if you do decide to keep your horse and never ride her, you really would need to keep her for life. She'll be basically worthless as years go by. I know it's a lot to think about. But do keep your safety in mind first.
Best of luck in whatever you decide to do!

Last edited by Heelsdown; 05-23-2012 at 12:46 AM.
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post #23 of 40 Old 05-23-2012, 01:15 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Heelsdown View Post
Another thing to keep in mind, if you do decide to keep your horse and never ride her, you really would need to keep her for life. She'll be basically worthless as years go by.
I agreed with everything you said above EXCEPT this part of the post. As someone who volunteers at a horse sanctuary, it was that mindset that made people believe they could never do anything with a horse who wasn't trained as a yearling. We have a number of horses (out of the 35 we have) at the sanctuary that are just hitting their late teens and early twenties just learning how to be ridden. NO horse is ever worthless, no matter the amount of training or the age. For example - One of our mustangs was used as breeding stock only, and only halter broke, and was almost turned over to a slaughter house because people thought she was worthless after she was done throwing foals. Well she is now under saddle and on her way to becoming one of our lesson horses. It may take a little extra work, and it may go slower than training a yearling, but a middle aged horse can learn if a human is willing to be patient and train.

And in this case we are talking about a horse that already knows how to be ridden, they don't forget that training, they just get a little rusty not worthless.
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post #24 of 40 Old 05-23-2012, 01:25 AM
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If you've got the time and desire to work with her and the money to get a trainer then I would keep her.
If not then I would sale her to someone else. Just be honest about what her issues are.
IMO -There's nothing wrong with admitting a horse is too much for you, and if you are scared of her that will transfer into your riding. I would not want to ride a horse like the one you describe. My sister however would love the challenge.
To each their own.

So in lies the madness, the pursuit of the impossible in the face of the complete assurance that you will fail, and yet still you chase.
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post #25 of 40 Old 05-23-2012, 08:39 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by trvlingheart View Post
I agreed with everything you said above EXCEPT this part of the post. As someone who volunteers at a horse sanctuary, it was that mindset that made people believe they could never do anything with a horse who wasn't trained as a yearling. We have a number of horses (out of the 35 we have) at the sanctuary that are just hitting their late teens and early twenties just learning how to be ridden. NO horse is ever worthless, no matter the amount of training or the age. For example - One of our mustangs was used as breeding stock only, and only halter broke, and was almost turned over to a slaughter house because people thought she was worthless after she was done throwing foals. Well she is now under saddle and on her way to becoming one of our lesson horses. It may take a little extra work, and it may go slower than training a yearling, but a middle aged horse can learn if a human is willing to be patient and train.

And in this case we are talking about a horse that already knows how to be ridden, they don't forget that training, they just get a little rusty not worthless.
True - a horse can be trained later in life (teens) and be just fine, but the reality is that most people who are willing to take on an untrained horse are usually going to lean towards a younger horse less set in its ways. Just letting a horse set in the field for years really hurts the chances of finding that horse a good productive home later on. Even if the horse was started undersaddle when younger, if its been left out in the field for years most people are going to view that as starting training all over again. And in this current horse workd - there are way too many horses looking for homes that most people aren't going to go with the older untrained horse.

All I pay my psychiatrist is cost of feed and hay, and he'll listen to me any day!

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post #26 of 40 Old 05-23-2012, 08:59 AM
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OP-I have not read this all in depth, nor do I know what happened to you in your past. We all have issues. Certainly it is your choice if you decide to keep her. But, I would agree you are not doing her any favors, as she does need a job, and that job will help to insure that heaven forbid, something happens to you, she can go on in her job and not come to an end you would not want. Yeah, they can be trained older, or after being not ridden for years, but not a lot of folks do that. It is much easier to rehome a horse who is useable. Just a fact.

Anyway, as someone who has also had issues which led to a total lack of confidence, which led to me being "overhorsed" a couple of times, both of whom went on to others, retrained and have awesome jobs they excel at.
I have no idea how old you are, but I finally came to the following conclusions:
-I have horses so that I can enjoy them
-I do enjoy riding them
-I am NOT getting any younger
-I needed a horse I could trust
-I am a total wimp
-ALL horses have vices. You need to know what they are and make sure they are something you are willing and able to deal with. In my case, if one of mine EVER reared like that-I would NEVER trust it again. That is just me. I would still do everything I could to figure it out, but I would have to get rid of it. I have to know that no matter what, mine will not do anything dangerous. Period. THere are many good horses out there, all of them have love to give. Do not feel badly if she doesn't work for you.

Oh-and I would suggest a chiro in addition to the vet. Sometimes they see things the vet may not. Then you will know you have all the info, and can make an informed decision. Like I said-after a rear like you described-I would be GIVING the horse away with full disclosure to someone who can deal with her, and chalk it up to experience.

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post #27 of 40 Old 05-23-2012, 01:03 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks for all of the advice everyone. I have decided to keep Nala for now and work with her. I thought about the events that day over and over and I feel that its possible that she was pushed to far to fast. She's only 9 and I was told very little about her history, in fact, the woman I bought her from refuses to put me into contact with her previous owner. My trainer and I are going to start her as if she were a totally green colt and go from there. I can always sell her at a later date if she really won't work for me.
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Women and cats will do as they please, and men and dogs should relax and get used to the idea. - Robert A. Heinlein
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post #28 of 40 Old 05-25-2012, 11:25 AM Thread Starter
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More questions than answers...

I've had some interesting questions posed to me about Nala, her past, and possible reasons for why she reared. She's a 9 year old TWH who was supposedly registered. If she was, then it is also possible that she was shown. If she was shown then it is also possible that she was sored. It's also possible that she was shown in harness and never broke to ride. Like I said...lots of questions with very few answers. Lots to think about also. I have a trainer coming out who has experience with rescues and abused horses...so we'll see
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Women and cats will do as they please, and men and dogs should relax and get used to the idea. - Robert A. Heinlein
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post #29 of 40 Old 05-25-2012, 11:42 AM
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Trvlingheart I should have clarified....a horse isn't worthless in terms of what they can do or their potential. But they will be deemed worthless in an already down horse market. A horse that hasn't been ridden in years could easily end up in the wrong hands and eventually the meat truck. There are good solid horses who can't find homes and many people don't want to deal with a project.

DixieDarlin' you are a great owner and are truly trying to do right by this horse. That is smart to ask the help of a trainer. Do everything you can. And if she's still too much horse for you, then know you did your best.
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post #30 of 40 Old 05-25-2012, 11:53 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Heelsdown View Post
DixieDarlin' you are a great owner and are truly trying to do right by this horse. That is smart to ask the help of a trainer. Do everything you can. And if she's still too much horse for you, then know you did your best.
Thanks Heelsdown. She's not my first horse or even my first rescue by any means She's just way too nice of a horse not to give every chance. I found out this week that she didn't even know how to drink out of a stock tank/water trough We're taking everything nice and slow. We won't be starting any serious work or conditioning until after the vet and farrier have been out. Until then we're working on the small stuff...like learning to drink out of something that isn't a bucket

Women and cats will do as they please, and men and dogs should relax and get used to the idea. - Robert A. Heinlein
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