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Too big for your horse short-term damage or ok for a little while?

This is a discussion on Too big for your horse short-term damage or ok for a little while? within the Plus Sized Riders forums, part of the The Horse Forum Community category

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        08-05-2013, 01:14 PM
      #41
    Foal
    I am a heavygirl and HAVE NOT ridden my horse since I bought her over fera of being to heavy. I will be having my saddle fitter & Massage therapist out tomorrow so I am going to ask her she will be honest I would think as everyone else including vet says go for it but, no....can't do it. I am going to see a 2,000lb draft tomorrow and riding her does ot worry me as well as my friends draft X who is 14.3 but, wide as can be. My horse is a tall TB she is not a narrow one but, she is long backed. UGHHH this thread is very interesting. Do you feel awkward going to try out a new horse being big I do actually but, it is what it is. I guess.
         
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        08-05-2013, 01:44 PM
      #42
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by cowgirllinda1952    
    . And what about big tall men who weigh that much or more?
    Ah now that is so different, some people are anti fat riders, rather really worrying about weight per se.
         
        08-06-2013, 04:34 AM
      #43
    Weanling
    Sorayita, I did feel awkward, but I made sure to ask the sellers if they thought the horse would be ok with a heavy rider, and no one batted an eye when I went to look at their horses (I'm assuming because if they didn't want a big rider on their horses they wouldn't have said they could handle one). Do you mind if I ask how big your mare is?

    Yep, Golden Horse, I agree it's a lot different. I definitely see where "anti fat rider" camp is coming from, although of course I hope to be spared from judgment when riding a suitable horse. Generally there's a huge difference in weight distribution and balance between a 250lb 6' person and a 250-pound 5'4" person. So when I talk about weight, I don't mean "Can this horse carry this many pounds?" I mean "Can this horse comfortable haul my fat butt around?"
         
        08-09-2013, 06:28 PM
      #44
    Green Broke
    When you are heavy, and talking myself here too.

    It is doubly important to assess saddle fit with you mounted. And also to keep the rules of saddle fitting you in mind, instead of just wedging yourself into any saddle you can.

    As for the cavalry comments? Those men would DIE if their horse went lame and they could not keep up with the unit. There were no equine transports, and no one could double up either when riding to battle, or out of patrol.

    That is why the rule of thumb was tighter in weight. A horse carrying a heavier load was more apt to break down and the odds weren't good if you lagged behind when the Indians attacked either. Your horse was your life.

    As for your weight, keep working at it, as you will find you ride much better the lighter you get.

    And while people may say they are balanced at higher weights? Still not as balanced as you are at lower weight. Weight is weight. Doesn't matter if you are in Crocs or en pointe. You still weigh what you weigh.

    Saying I am balanced is just whitewashing.
    Inga, xdressage and SammysMom like this.
         
        08-09-2013, 08:29 PM
      #45
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Palomine    

    And while people may say they are balanced at higher weights? Still not as balanced as you are at lower weight. Weight is weight. Doesn't matter if you are in Crocs or en pointe. You still weigh what you weigh.

    Saying I am balanced is just whitewashing.
    But is weight just weight?

    Right up front let me say that I am not arguing your basic premise, I know only to well that I'm a better rider when I'm lighter, no arguing there, but weight is weight? I wonder:is board, Hiphophorseman is tall, nearly 7' if I remember, and very solid, he weighs more than most, but looks fit.

    I saw a video the other day of a person who may well be within the 20% rule , I don't know, but this person is not a tidy rider, they appear to pull themself up by the reins to post, for instance.

    Seems that there are good and bad riders of every weight, gender, color and creed and in every discipline, it is the matching of the right horse and rider, and the correct tack and discipline that makes a happy partnership.
    Cat, smrobs, DimSum and 1 others like this.
         
        08-10-2013, 12:15 AM
      #46
    Trained
    A heavy person whose weight is largely bone & muscle is more likely to balance well. There are enough challenges in balancing on a horse - at least for those of us who started later in life - without fighting extra weight as well. If I had to put on the battle gear I wore in Afghanistan while riding, it wouldn't be just my horse who would complain!

    But that doesn't mean someone cannot ride. The back injury I received with Mia's help in Jan 2009 probably did more harm to my balance and ability to move with the horse than an extra 50 or 75 lbs of weight would.

    If you have a physical limitation - be it a fat belly or a rigid back - you may need to make some compromises in your riding. No jumping, for example, or no starting a green horse who doesn't know how to balance a person's weight. It may mean you need to use a western saddle to distribute the weight over a larger area, or limit your rides to 30 or 45 minutes instead of 3 hours. It may well mean using a mounting block, or selecting a horse with thick loins and thick legs. It may mean taking lessons, and taking those lessons seriously.

    But with some adjustments, you can still ride. And riding often gives one the incentive to lose weight, or to work on getting your back more flexible. It can also help create a positive attitude toward life, and that often helps with weight. I doubt I'm the only one on this forum who, after having a rough day, has saddled up his horse and ridden her largely to relax. I've even told her, while saddling up, "We're not going anywhere particular this evening...I just want the pleasure of your company." And being the supremely egotistical mare that she is, she seems to understand - after all, who wouldn't want her company?

    I've seen a 100 lb girl bounce so much that the horse pinned its ears, and shortly after that refused to canter or go any faster than a slow trot. With some skill, a good saddle, a fit horse, and an appropriate agenda for the ride, a person can reasonably ride up to about 30% of the horse's weight. But it is important, as the load increases, to have some control measures to care for the horse. They are forgiving creatures, but we need to make sure we don't give them too much to forgive...
         
        08-10-2013, 10:25 PM
      #47
    Yearling
    I don't agree with weight is weight because trying to move dead weight verses limber weight is a MAJOR difference. Moving something that is reluctant to move (a stiff rider) verses moving something with some give (a limber rider) is like night and day.
         
        08-12-2013, 05:18 PM
      #48
    Foal
    Cool

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by SammysMom    
    Sorayita, I did feel awkward, but I made sure to ask the sellers if they thought the horse would be ok with a heavy rider, and no one batted an eye when I went to look at their horses (I'm assuming because if they didn't want a big rider on their horses they wouldn't have said they could handle one). Do you mind if I ask how big your mare is?

    Yep, Golden Horse, I agree it's a lot different. I definitely see where "anti fat rider" camp is coming from, although of course I hope to be spared from judgment when riding a suitable horse. Generally there's a huge difference in weight distribution and balance between a 250lb 6' person and a 250-pound 5'4" person. So when I talk about weight, I don't mean "Can this horse carry this many pounds?" I mean "Can this horse comfortable haul my fat butt around?"
    Yes, she is 16.2hh and about 1,200lbs if not a bit more
         

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