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Calmwaters 10-16-2011 10:47 PM

Lungeing on uneven...
 
ground? Is it ok? There is no completly flat ground were I can lounge Tequila and I am not sure if its ok to lunge on a slightly inclined area? I would like to lunge her on days that my back is hurting me to much to make myself get in the saddle. :oops:

TheLastUnicorn 10-16-2011 11:28 PM

As long as there are no ruts or holes, and you remember it will be harder work than on flat ground, it can actually be beneficial in helping the horse to learn self carriage.

Remember to use as large a circle as you can, especially at first, to make it less strain on her.

Calmwaters 10-17-2011 08:45 AM

Ok thank you.

Cherie 10-17-2011 09:26 AM

I 'hunt' uneven ground. I used to longe my horses on a pond dam. The horse went up the dam, across the dam, down to and through the water where it was about 2-3 feet deep, back up the dam, back across the dam and down the backside of the dam. It used to be a lot of fun watching people's reactions to my doing this.

I also had horses that I field hunted and used to do a full set of jumps on a longe line. The jumps were 8 - 12 feet wide and up to 4 feet high. All had a ground pole and a jump pole leaned up against the standard closest to me so the longe line would not catch on it.

I just walked around the ring taking a shorter route. I like jumping horses in a jumping lane and without one, I just used to do a lot of jumping on a longe line.

loosie 10-17-2011 11:25 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Cherie (Post 1203178)
I 'hunt' uneven ground. I used to longe my horses on a pond dam. The horse went up the dam, across the dam, down to and through the water where it was about 2-3 feet deep, back up the dam, back across the dam and down the backside of the dam. It used to be a lot of fun watching people's reactions to my doing this.

:lol: Lunging's just too boring just doing circles on flat ground IMO! I think it's also easier to keep a horse focussed & thinking if they've got to think about where they're going. I do as you describe with a dam in my paddock & I tend to walk while I'm doing it, so each time round it's a bit different. Have 'lunged' over & under all sorts of obstacles, including stairs, bridges, cattle loading ramps...

mom2pride 10-17-2011 11:45 PM

I agree, as long as the area you can work in isn't full of holes or other things that could injure the horse (obscure ruts, that sort of stuff); you will be fine. Uneven terrain in and of itself will keep the horse more focused on actually picking up his feet, and carrying himself well, rather than just plodding along lazily.

If alot of people knew some of the areas I have lunged my horses they would probably think I'm next to cruel...incidentally I never have a horse refuse to go over anything, ever, even if he's never faced it before; I use embankments, ditches, little creeks, logs in paths, etc, all to my advantage when they happen to be in the area I am working in. There is alot you can do to keep your groundwork both interesting and beneficial.

mom2pride 10-17-2011 11:57 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Cherie (Post 1203178)
I 'hunt' uneven ground. I used to longe my horses on a pond dam. The horse went up the dam, across the dam, down to and through the water where it was about 2-3 feet deep, back up the dam, back across the dam and down the backside of the dam. It used to be a lot of fun watching people's reactions to my doing this.

You know it's funny when people have seen me to sending exercises with my mare over bridges, or other obstacles, and they just stand there with their eyes wide open, and then come over and ask how long it took to teach her that, because they can hardly get their horses to lunge let alone go back and forth across a bridge with me on the ground midway between the bridge...:lol:

loosie 10-18-2011 12:21 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mom2pride (Post 1204157)
and then come over and ask how long it took to teach her that, because they can hardly get their horses to lunge let alone go back and forth across a bridge with me on the ground midway between the bridge...:lol:

A (slightly neurotic:lol:) friend asked me to look after & exercise her horse one time as she was sick. I thought nothing of the terrain or anything really & the horse was fine. She turned up one day & watched me, before asking me how long it took to train her & get her over her 'hangups' in order to do that. She wasn't very impressed when she got better & tried it & her horse wouldn't have a bar of it!:lol: When I looked after this horse I found her to be a quiet, sensible type, but you wouldn't know it when she's with her owner, she seems quite nervous of her own shadow...

mom2pride 10-18-2011 12:43 AM

I still think it's amazing how quickly a horse will emanate it's handler...probably one of those things as a trainer I will never get over, no matter how many times I 'see it' happen.

Cherie 10-18-2011 08:09 AM

What's the matter with holes and tree roots and ??????

Every place my horses live has them. Every place I ride has them --- and much worse. I ride many places I would have difficulty walking on my own two feet. I would much rather my horse learned to handle such footing without me. When I was buying prospects (before I started raising all of them) I used to longe them like this to help the poor barn and corral raised things learn to place their feet. I wanted them to learn how to handle rough footing without me. I have gathered cattle and gone elk hunting on ground that makes a little pond dam or a few holes look like a sliding track.


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