The Horse Forum

The Horse Forum (/)
-   Horse Law (http://www.horseforum.com/horse-law/)
-   -   To negotiate or not? (http://www.horseforum.com/horse-law/negotiate-not-102310/)

Kelly22790 11-02-2011 06:03 PM

To negotiate or not?
 
The horse I am buying is a 5 year old mare... With only 30 days professional training on her. She's definitely a project horse. The plus sides are her coloring (she's gorgeous!), her bloodlines, and her puppy dog temperament (although she can be very witchy at times... Rearing etc).

When I went to see this horse, she crow hopped with the owner on her four times and twice on the ground. Mind you, she hadn't had anything done with her in probably 3 months or so (plus there were dogs running at her and nipping her). Me and my trainer left thinking no way. Yet, something about her was bothering us both and my trainer suggested we ask for a trial period.

The girl had the horse on the market for over 3 months with NO calls except for us. She agreed to a one month trial period. At the time I saw the ad, she had her listed for sale at $2,300. However, when she met me and my trainer she thought we were a perfect match and told us if we took her she would give us a "great deal." When she agreed to the month trial she told me she had decided on $1,800 for the horse. I did put this figure in the contract. I also paid $75 to take her on trial.

The trial period is up in 8 days. I definitely want to buy her but this horse seems more like $1,500 to me. Many people at the barn I board at said that they would offer even less - simply because she will take so much time (she's an awesome horse don't get me wrong... She has done AMAZING in the month we have had her... And she never crow hopped or anything while with us). I am going to call her tonight to give my decision... But my question is... Is it wrong of me or unreasonable to ask for the $300 lower? I mean, that's a month's board for me and 1,500 is the price me and my trainer had in mind when we went to go see her. What do you think?
Posted via Mobile Device

Kelly22790 11-02-2011 06:14 PM

She also informed me that she didn't expect 2,300$, she listed to price high to weed out bad people (her words)
Posted via Mobile Device

equiniphile 11-02-2011 07:02 PM

There's really no way for us to tell you if you are overpaying with no videos, pictures, or bloodlines on the horse. However, a horse that rears is very dangerous and most likely not worth what she's asking.

Kelly22790 11-02-2011 07:08 PM

She is in no way dangerous! There are pictures of her on my profile on here. She has impressive/sonny dee bar bloodlines
Posted via Mobile Device

Kelly22790 11-02-2011 07:14 PM

She has reared only while on the ground (never with us on her). Last night she reared while I was switching the side of the chain to lunge her the other way only because the halter somehow came off of one ear and another part of the halter was pinching. She reared, I let her collect herself and then I backed her and she was fine. The other time she reared was with my trainer while she was also switching the chain but this time it wasn't because anything was wrong... She was testing (as a 5 year old with little training might do!)... My trainer backed her around the arena twice and she got the point and settled down. She is not dangerous, she just tests sometimes.
Posted via Mobile Device

Dreamcatcher Arabians 11-02-2011 08:25 PM

It depends on how the contract is worded. When you put the $1800 figure in the contract, how did you word it? Is it "Owner has agreed to ask $1800 OBO" in there or "Owner and Lessee have agreed on $1800 purchase price"? If you have agreed to the purchase price and you no longer think it's fair ($1800 for a horse under saddle is too much????? oh my I'm glad I'm not trying to sell anything), then you either need to pay it or pass on the horse all together and let the owner come down of her own accord.

If/when I do a lease, I have pre-negotiated the purchase price for the end of the lease (that's in your favor because after the lease I can't decide she's now worth $5K after you've trained her) and if you tried to negotiate me down from the pre-agreed figure I'd decline and take my horse back. However, if you said something like, "Well, I like her but she's not as far along in her training as I thought in the beginning, so I'm going to pass.", that leaves room for me to come back and offer to cut the figure even more, if I'm going to without you being rude or cutting down the horse. Does that make sense?

Side note: Rearing on the ground IS an issue, at least for me. That would be enough for me to decline the horse and keep on looking.

Kelly22790 11-02-2011 08:28 PM

That makes sense dreamcatcher. The only thing is I am certain I want to buy her, whether or not she agrees to lower the price at all. So if I say no thanks and she does not offer a price reduction.. I just lost my horse. Trying to figure out a way to ask without being rude.
Posted via Mobile Device

Dreamcatcher Arabians 11-02-2011 08:44 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Kelly22790 (Post 1220590)
That makes sense dreamcatcher. The only thing is I am certain I want to buy her, whether or not she agrees to lower the price at all. So if I say no thanks and she does not offer a price reduction.. I just lost my horse. Trying to figure out a way to ask without being rude.
Posted via Mobile Device


Ok, is there anything she does or does not do that you were not made aware of when you negotiated the price? Because you can then say, "I was not aware of......" or "I was under the impression that she already knew........but she doesn't and that is fairly critical for me. Would you be open to re-opening the negotiations?". That's at least an opener and not rude or implying that she didn't disclose something she should have. In this economy, if she really wants to sell the horse she's probably open to at least discussing things.

Saddlebag 11-02-2011 09:53 PM

Kelly, I think the seller is already counting on the fact you want the horse. If she'd had other offers she'd have been putting the pressure on you to buy or return the horse. If you are comfortable with it, make a counter offer. Don't mention how much you like the horse or how her training is going unless she asks. That is the time to mention the rearing. Don't elaborate as that is your bargaining chip. Take however much cash you are willing to spend and not a dollar more. Have it in your pocket and leave your purse at home. Pull it out of your pocket, let her know how much you have and that's it. When she sees the cash I'll bet she decides on the spot because she won't want to see that money leaving the yard. Hee hee, I've done this many times - my horse trailer, a real nice camera, my truck, saddles, horses.

jumpingrules92 11-03-2011 03:41 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Saddlebag (Post 1220727)
Kelly, I think the seller is already counting on the fact you want the horse. If she'd had other offers she'd have been putting the pressure on you to buy or return the horse. If you are comfortable with it, make a counter offer. Don't mention how much you like the horse or how her training is going unless she asks. That is the time to mention the rearing. Don't elaborate as that is your bargaining chip. Take however much cash you are willing to spend and not a dollar more. Have it in your pocket and leave your purse at home. Pull it out of your pocket, let her know how much you have and that's it. When she sees the cash I'll bet she decides on the spot because she won't want to see that money leaving the yard. Hee hee, I've done this many times - my horse trailer, a real nice camera, my truck, saddles, horses.

This, works like a charm every time.


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 12:40 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0