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Shadow Puppet 11-10-2011 09:19 AM

Blindness In Blue Eye's Horse?
 
There Is a double blue eye'd horse at my stable. She's only two and her owners are just starting to work with her...But she absolutly freaks out when you even walk over to her left side. I know that blue eye'd horses carry this gene but how can tell that this horse is blind? She's fine on her right side but if you even attempt to ask her to change directions she freaks out quite dangerously. She has had conjunctivitis in both eyes but all the horses were spreading around, and she got over it quickly. Everyone is stumped because she's fine on one side but not the other...? So any tips on how to tell if a horse is blind would be great! Thank!

Cherie 11-10-2011 09:39 AM

Has she had an ophthalmic examination? That is where you need to start. A knowledgeable Vet (preferably one that has specialized in Ophthalmology) should examine this horse. Eye problems should not be taken lightly and some eye conditions require immediate attention while others are chronic but still respond to proper treatment. If a horse already has a loss of vision, it should be thoroughly explored so handlers and owners can make an informed decision as to what is the best course and future of this horse. Just blundering on and hoping for the best is a bad case of 'barn blind' on the part of the owner.

caseymyhorserocks 11-10-2011 02:19 PM

Agreed Cherie, have a vet check him out. Meanwhile, a test you can do quickly wave something down from his eye, such as your hand. Hold your hand about where the top of his ear is, and wave it down quickly, but make sure you do it about 1-2 feet away from his eye, or he could just feel the air. Watch his reaction closely. Does his eye or ear flick toward you? Does a jerk his head away- did you not notice it? If he reacts at all, he probably isn't blind. But if he doesn't react, he may be. EITHER WAY- have a vet look at his eye- they can do a much more advanced test. Make sure you repeat several times to.

Corporal 11-10-2011 02:31 PM

She is probably going blind. A Vet can figure this out in about 10 minutes. I know bc I had a horse that was losing his sight, and my Vet caught it doing routine work, took him into the dark barn with a penlight and confirmed the diagnoses. I saw no symptoms. He said that the horse would be jumping and kicking at shadows until he went totally blind, then could be used. This is a tough one. Everybody says, in theory, that you can use a totally blind horse. But when YOURS is the blind horse, it's tough to know what to do. =(
Certainly, the show ring becomes out of the question, but the horse IS comprimised, and vulnerable even if only one eye is blind. I think we're going to see more of this bc we have so much breeding for color, including blue-eyed Arabians and TB's. The gene for blindness is getting spread around more often.
My pony, "Toma" was a tobiano paint with a brown face, big blaze, 2 blue eyes, and he died at 35yo without any vision problems. (I owned him for 1/2 of his life.)

bubba13 11-11-2011 12:54 AM

There is no genetic link between blue eyes and blindness.

Cherie 11-11-2011 10:56 AM

I know of no link between blue eyes and blindness. Blue eyes and deafness is well documented but I know of no connection to blindness like that seen in some dog breeds.

oakzori 01-05-2015 10:36 PM

I just had a vet check out my double blue eyed horse for any eye issues. He is a very jumpy sort and really freaks out over texture changes when trail riding and training and HATES HATES HATES shiny surfaces... Taken lots of time to get him to go over black asphalt. I finally had a chance to have a vet look at him and he said what I was thinking. Basically the horse has no pigment in the back of his eye (happens to be blue eyed as well) so when light shines in his eye it is extra bright where usually there is a dark surface for the light to reflect off of (sort of like snow blindness I guess but not as bad) So extra reflective surfaces are super bright to him and cause him to react more when he is already a tightly wound horse. He does great in dimly light arenas. -- I'd also have to say, use a lead rope and find out at what distance does the horse trust you to be on that side...20 feet away, 15 feet, 10 feet, or just close up. someone could have beat the horse, I have also seen a horse who had their face fractured by another horse kicking it at a young age... you could also try using a twitch and use the pressure point on the nose. that sometimes works for just breaking through that initial fear of something new. grab them by the nose until they start licking and drop their head and then just touch his face... I was mostly looking at this post to see if anyone had reflective surface issues with horses and history of pigment...but I'm not finding much out there.

DancingArabian 01-06-2015 01:30 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by oakzori (Post 6831674)
I just had a vet check out my double blue eyed horse for any eye issues. He is a very jumpy sort and really freaks out over texture changes when trail riding and training and HATES HATES HATES shiny surfaces... Taken lots of time to get him to go over black asphalt. I finally had a chance to have a vet look at him and he said what I was thinking. Basically the horse has no pigment in the back of his eye (happens to be blue eyed as well) so when light shines in his eye it is extra bright where usually there is a dark surface for the light to reflect off of (sort of like snow blindness I guess but not as bad) So extra reflective surfaces are super bright to him and cause him to react more when he is already a tightly wound horse. He does great in dimly light arenas. -- I'd also have to say, use a lead rope and find out at what distance does the horse trust you to be on that side...20 feet away, 15 feet, 10 feet, or just close up. someone could have beat the horse, I have also seen a horse who had their face fractured by another horse kicking it at a young age... you could also try using a twitch and use the pressure point on the nose. that sometimes works for just breaking through that initial fear of something new. grab them by the nose until they start licking and drop their head and then just touch his face... I was mostly looking at this post to see if anyone had reflective surface issues with horses and history of pigment...but I'm not finding much out there.

Have you tried to see if something like a flymask helps dim the light for him?

Something that offers a lot of protection, like the Guardian Mask: Guardian Mask - Uveitis, Glaucoma, Cataracts, Eye Cancer & Eye Injuries

squirrelfood 01-06-2015 08:19 AM

Blue eyed horses have no more eye problems than blue eyed people.
Quote:

She's only two and her owners are just starting to work with her..
THIS^^ is the problem.


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