The Horse Forum

The Horse Forum (/)
-   Driving (http://www.horseforum.com/driving/)
-   -   Babystepping towards driving--need advice (http://www.horseforum.com/driving/babystepping-towards-driving-need-advice-103405/)

Corporal 11-14-2011 05:46 PM

Babystepping towards driving--need advice
 
I've been thinking about training my 5yo QH to drive after he's finished training as a riding horse. He is calm and sane, Red Dunn, 15'2hh, well built, and doggone it, I think he'd look great driving! I tried
driving with another QH, now passed on, many years ago. That horse was 17yo. He handled the breaking cart allright, and you could lead him anywhere pulling weight in it, but I gave up after he got scared of my buggy. (The 4-wheeled buggy has been sold.) I talked to several Amish harness shops there and a buggy shop in the Amish community about one hour away from us. They all agreed that I should get my horse fitted to a Collar, and use that instead of a breastplate harness. Any thoughts? I'm interested in your opinion bc my QH is young, and that gives me plenty of time to break him to it. I intend to start long-lining him this winter, with no particular time deadline in mind--I just want to proceed from goal to goal with him, and keep him comfortable.
I don't own a harness right now, but I do own a wooden breaking cart, which has been stored well.
ANY driving advice would be appreciated! Thanks! =D

jimmy 11-14-2011 06:04 PM

hi i don,t know if the driving collar or the breast plate makes that much differance,i,m just finishing breaking, a nine yrs old gypsy cob,and for the last couple of weeks i have used her in a four wheeled wagon collecting scrap metal[going to drive her to appleby next summer] .well with her shoulders been tender ,the working collar rubbed her shoulders,so i have now switched to a breast collar so i can adjust it over where she,s rubbed,the breast collar is,ent ideal for pulling weight but it is,ent making any differance in how she drives

Taffy Clayton 11-14-2011 06:38 PM

My sugestion is do not use a collar if you are a beginner. You don't really need a collar for a light weight breaking cart. Collars can be hard to fit and any change in weight can cause you to need a different size collar, sometimes the difference between a horses summer and winter coat can make a collar not fit well. I have seen the result of an illfitting collar from just one pleasure show, while it didn't rub him raw the indentations in his neck muscles even 48 hours later were disterbing.
A breast collar is much easier to find, fit and resell if needed. I would also stick with a two wheel vehicle untill you both are further along in training, a 4 wheeler, unless undercut, can be very dangerous and a severe tip hazard.
If you do end up getting a collar harness I have a brand new 29" collar for sale.

churumbeque 11-14-2011 06:53 PM

It depends on where the traces hook in. That determines if you use a breast plate or collar. If the traces hook in low near the axle then a collar is required as theangle goes downward for pulling . If they hook up higher the breast plate is used. It all has to do with the angle from the shoulder following the traces back.

churumbeque 11-14-2011 06:56 PM

Redirect Notice
see how the traces are low

churumbeque 11-14-2011 06:57 PM

http://www.horseweddingcarriages.co....g-carriage.jpg
This is incorrect and see how the breat plate is sitting funny and the traces are puilling downward

churumbeque 11-14-2011 06:58 PM

Horse Drawn Carriages
The picture on the left is REALLY bad and incorrect

churumbeque 11-14-2011 07:09 PM

1 Attachment(s)
And this one needs a breast plate as the traces hook in high and it has a straight line back.

Corporal 11-15-2011 01:16 PM

Thanks for the replies. I know that a harness with a breastplate is much easier to find, and the one I used to own was bought as used tack. I'll be happy to just purchase another one of them.
I have been studying the book, "Driving the Light Horse."
http://www.amazon.com/Driving-Light-Horse-Training-Competition/dp/0668056525/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1321376669&sr=1-1I got this about 15 years ago. It has illustrations re: correct fitting of harness to a cart. If I get confused, I'll just take my harness (when the horse is ready) with me to my Amish farrier's place and ask him to show me adjustments. (Boy, that yellow cart reminds me of this gorgeous 2-wheeled cart I saw which was painted yellow with brown...um...highlights(?) around the rims and decorating the body. It might go well with Buster's coloring, especially if I were to oil up his forearm's zebra stripes. ha, ha)
The linked pics you shared did indeed look like the shafts were too high. I go to Arthur, IL (local Amish community) for a lot for auctions, farrier work and the like, so I get to see their horses harnessed up.
I have another question--do you have brakes on your carts/carriages?

churumbeque 11-15-2011 01:24 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Corporal (Post 1234082)
Thanks for the replies. I know that a harness with a breastplate is much easier to find, and the one I used to own was bought as used tack. I'll be happy to just purchase another one of them.
I have been studying the book, "Driving the Light Horse."
Amazon.com: Driving the Light Horse: Training for Pleasure and Competition (9780668056526): Charlene Davis Roth: Books
I got this about 15 years ago. It has illustrations re: correct fitting of harness to a cart. If I get confused, I'll just take my harness (when the horse is ready) with me to my Amish farrier's place and ask him to show me adjustments. (Boy, that yellow cart reminds me of this gorgeous 2-wheeled cart I saw which was painted yellow with brown...um...highlights(?) around the rims and decorating the body. It might go well with Buster's coloring, especially if I were to oil up his forearm's zebra stripes. ha, ha)
The linked pics you shared did indeed look like the shafts were too high. I go to Arthur, IL (local Amish community) for a lot for auctions, farrier work and the like, so I get to see their horses harnessed up.
I have another question--do you have brakes on your carts/carriages?

Brakes are for 4 wheel carriages not 2 wheel carts. So although I am not positive but I think every 4 wheeler should have brakes and 2 wheelers don't.


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 03:22 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0