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drafts4ever 11-16-2011 12:15 AM

Legacy rearing
 
***Feel free to skip this part. I've bolded a summary description below***
Between January and now she's come so far with this! I have no videos of her learning in January but she's come a long way with her cue.
I used to have to pull her up and hold her there. After her front feet left the ground she knew what was expected of her it was just getting up there when she had been so used to being reprimanded for doing that previously. It was retraining her and keeping the knowledge of when it's ok and when it's not. She was a confused horsey at first.
Once she realized that she was being asked for it she began to find it more fun but getting up on the ground she was sticky about. She'd come up just a little and then go back down. I stuck with that and made it solid.
In June we had a photo shoot on the beach where she surprised me by coming straight up and standing there while a couple photographers ran around her. She even pivoted slightly towards the photographer on her left. Unfortunately the sand started to slide out from under her feet so she had a bumpy landing and I slid off landing on my feet and giving her a giant hug.
We've been working on lighter cues, bringing her up with just a slight hand movement and mostly leg along with her cue work "lift". Now she's come to the point where she knows what's expected from her set up. I set her up by keeping contact, saying "ready" and sitting deep, move my hands forward, squeeze and say "lift". 90% of the time she comes right up. If not, we back up three steps and try again after setting up. She's a smart girl and won't come up if she feels off balance. Usually three steps forward or backwards puts us on more even ground for a good lift.
Recently though she's decided to walk out of it early instead of holding so we're working on staying up like she used to. All around though with her training including her tricks I'm very proud of her. She still has a ways to go but she's getting there! She's an amazing horse.
:D

amp23 11-16-2011 12:18 AM

That's awesome :) congrats on getting further with her training and her doing so well!

RedTree 11-16-2011 12:49 AM

thats awesome :D

tinyliny 11-16-2011 12:54 AM

I wondered how you did that. YOur old avatar picture was just scary, with her so vertical. But I am a timid soul.

Horsesdontlie 11-16-2011 01:03 AM

I have seen so many people who just jerk up and kick and the horse, more often then naught has too much backwards momentum and throws their head back. It scares me seeing those people that do that, just asking for the flip.

Yet you seem to have taught forward momentum and subtle cues that have nothing to do with head tossing or pulling back on the bit. Bonus points to you. Looks pretty much to be the same way my boy is asked to rear.

DuffyDuck 11-16-2011 01:44 AM

I'm glad other people commented so I could read through, you nearly gave me a heart attack!!

Can someone explain (not having a dig!) why you would teach a horse to rear?? Thanks!

Horsesdontlie 11-16-2011 01:55 AM

For myself, my horse had a rearing problem before I taught it to him. He was dangerous, throwing himself up into the air, grabbing the bit and fighting. After he threw himself over backwards, almost landing on me, I had two options. First was retire him permanently or the other was try to teach him to balance himself. (All other options had been tried and failed to get him to stop rearing)

So I taught him to rear by collecting his weight onto his hindquarters and holding it. I taught him to not explode off his hindquarters or throw himself anywhere. He learned to keep his hind legs underneath him and keep his balance.

He has not flipped on me since, neither has he come close. After I taught it to him, it was something that I made him do and it was under my control...so he stopped using it as an evasion technique.

DuffyDuck 11-16-2011 01:57 AM

Ah.. so its like the old thing if you teach a dog to jump a fence, it won't do it till your command?

I never thought of doing that, really! Never encountered a rearer that bad.. glad to hear he's not tumbling on top of you any more!

Horsesdontlie 11-16-2011 02:03 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by DuffyDuck (Post 1234883)
Ah.. so its like the old thing if you teach a dog to jump a fence, it won't do it till your command?

I never thought of doing that, really! Never encountered a rearer that bad.. glad to hear he's not tumbling on top of you any more!

Thats part of it, the other part is I learned to avoid the situations better. He reared because he would be past reason with overwhelming frustration. Most times it was coming home from a trail ride and I wouldn't let him gallop home. Once he started rearing there every time he was upset he reared. I don't put him in those situations anymore.

Even if he does rear because he is upset he sits on his haunches and holds his front feet about a foot off the ground and holds it. Lol. Its a nice switch. ;)

drafts4ever 11-16-2011 02:40 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Horsesdontlie (Post 1234881)
For myself, my horse had a rearing problem before I taught it to him. He was dangerous, throwing himself up into the air, grabbing the bit and fighting. After he threw himself over backwards, almost landing on me, I had two options. First was retire him permanently or the other was try to teach him to balance himself. (All other options had been tried and failed to get him to stop rearing)

So I taught him to rear by collecting his weight onto his hindquarters and holding it. I taught him to not explode off his hindquarters or throw himself anywhere. He learned to keep his hind legs underneath him and keep his balance.

He has not flipped on me since, neither has he come close. After I taught it to him, it was something that I made him do and it was under my control...so he stopped using it as an evasion technique.

This was our issue as well at the beginning. Tried everything to get her out of the habit on the line and once she figured out she could go straight up and hold it she started in on it under saddle. After she figured out I wasn't coming off she started bouncing around. I'm a trained rider for tricks. I went to a two year training camp for training tricks so I figured if I couldn't train it out of her I was going to train it as a job. Once she figured out it was a job it was all about tweaking it to make it perfect.
Now she has photo shoots lined up through the winter (if we get snow), and has a few performances pending next year for some faires we might be attending. It's also massively helped her with collecting and weighing in on her hind end instead of her front especially in her rapid and awkward growth spurts.
A friend of mine is putting together a group of jousters and is looking for an opening act. I've been asked to use Legacy in it. Given that most jousting shows do no accept loud colors like hers she's been invited to do something fun in the beginning instead which is going to be fun and amazing! I just hope the funds come through to put on the event we've been planning for!

So to summarize it was a bad habit turned into a productive job for photo shoots and shows. :D She's also a dressage horse and she's learning jumping (when she's not so butt high) and eventually will be doing lower level eventing.


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