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-   -   Clipping a tickly horse? (http://www.horseforum.com/horse-grooming/clipping-tickly-horse-104630/)

DuffyDuck 11-28-2011 04:59 AM

Clipping a tickly horse?
 
Well, Duffy & Clippers were an initial success! She's a bit scruffy by her mane, but didn't push her as she'd been so well behaved.

We were going to give her a trace clip, but the guy who was clipping her for me held the body of the clippers under her belly and on her flank, and she was proper tickly! She has neck and shoulders done, so thats better than nothing, apart from she looks like a complete fool xD

Any ideas on how to clip tickly horses, or anything I can do to help? Don't want to upset or nick her!

Derry girl 11-28-2011 02:27 PM

From experience of having a horse thats very hard to clip the best thing you can do is get a setative from your vet. shel still stand but will be near enough asleep, you can get it in an injection or a paste form that looks like a wormer, will last about an hr depending on how much you give your horse. This is about the safest way, no1 will get injured and your horse wont get stressed

DuffyDuck 11-28-2011 02:29 PM

Ta Derrygirl... I was thinking about that, but after working her tonight I think I might leave her, this will be good to know for next year though :)
She worked for an hour and because her neck and shoulder are free she wasn't sopping wet YAY :D

~*~anebel~*~ 11-28-2011 03:43 PM

I'm not a fan of sedatives for anything.g beyond x rays and teeth floating. I have a hard horse to clip - ticklish, noise sensitive and flighty - and I've found twitching and stuffing his ears has worked the best. We were able to clip him entirely in about an hour this year and get lots more of his belly.
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DuffyDuck 11-28-2011 03:49 PM

See, she didn't have to be sedated or twitched for the dentist!

Stuffing his ears?? I have NEVER heard or that, almost like the ear thingy's showjumpers tend to wear??

Thanks anebel! New to this whole actually working your horse for a sport thing and she was getting SO wet it wasn't fair to her!

~*~anebel~*~ 11-28-2011 03:54 PM

Exactly why I don't like sedatives... its a sport horse. If anything happens I want him fully awake and capable of getting out of said situation. I have seen so many accidents happen while the horse is under sedation because of the sedation, and there is always the possibility of penile paralysis as well with male horses.
So I manage the horses behavior. Yes stuffing the ears is like what the jumpers do but I just cut up a cheap sponge and stuff er in there. Twitching helps him to relax and stand still.
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DuffyDuck 11-28-2011 03:58 PM

I thankfully have never had any issues surrounding my horses requiring sedation, so never had to explore that option but now, I will be doing research, thank you anebel.

I say sportshorse, Duffy and I may do low levels, I wsa hoping for maybe more but don't think I'll make the grade!

If we do decide to clip her further, I will deffo explore that option, again, thanks anebel for the brilliant tip!

Derry girl 11-28-2011 04:12 PM

..seditives are competetly safe if you get the right amount from your vet for the type and size of horse you have, dont buy them straight of the shelf or of the internet... iv always used them for my horses and have never had a problem.. Im not telling you not to use a touch/twitch.. Iv used them b4, some horses dont mind them and they can work really well! but just b careful, last yard i was in, a horse was getting clipped and had a touch on, stood great for 10minutes and then reared and ripped the touch out of the owners hand and the touch swung round and smacked him on the head!.. so if you opt for a touch make sure its on good and tight and wont slip of and your not standing straight on front of them.

~*~anebel~*~ 11-28-2011 06:05 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Derry girl (Post 1247076)
..seditives are competetly safe if you get the right amount from your vet for the type and size of horse you have, dont buy them straight of the shelf or of the internet... iv always used them for my horses and have never had a problem.. Im not telling you not to use a touch/twitch.. Iv used them b4, some horses dont mind them and they can work really well! but just b careful, last yard i was in, a horse was getting clipped and had a touch on, stood great for 10minutes and then reared and ripped the touch out of the owners hand and the touch swung round and smacked him on the head!.. so if you opt for a touch make sure its on good and tight and wont slip of and your not standing straight on front of them.

Vet administered sedatives are NOT safe. I have experienced first hand their side effects (when vet administered) to the point the horse can actually lose control of their own limbs and is becomes very dangerous for both the horse and handlers.
I wish I could find the video but there is a very disturbing one of a horse under the effects of Chlorpromazine - and for 48 hours after with very little hindlimb/neck/head control. Under a standard, vet administered dosage.
Horses may also experience low heart rate and blood pressure, etc, etc, etc.. Sedatives are NOT safe, or a cure all.
I have used a twitch, safely and properly many times. That's awesome your friend had one bad experience, probably caused by poor handling more than anything. Used correctly and appropriately they are a tool and an experienced handler should have no issues with one. Drugs are not the answer!!

Derry girl 11-28-2011 07:10 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ~*~anebel~*~ (Post 1247234)
Vet administered sedatives are NOT safe. I have experienced first hand their side effects (when vet administered) to the point the horse can actually lose control of their own limbs and is becomes very dangerous for both the horse and handlers.
I wish I could find the video but there is a very disturbing one of a horse under the effects of Chlorpromazine - and for 48 hours after with very little hindlimb/neck/head control. Under a standard, vet administered dosage.
Horses may also experience low heart rate and blood pressure, etc, etc, etc.. Sedatives are NOT safe, or a cure all.
I have used a twitch, safely and properly many times. That's awesome your friend had one bad experience, probably caused by poor handling more than anything. Used correctly and appropriately they are a tool and an experienced handler should have no issues with one. Drugs are not the answer!!


I didnt say "drugs" were the answer, I think that is a bit dramatic.
I am talking from personal experience that iv never had any problems when using a seditive to get my horse clipped..thats terrible what happened the horse in your example.....So I was not trying to put any1 of using a twitch! I was simply saying make sure you are showen how to use it properl!! .. And the horse was not been poorly handled, Id rather you did not make light of my example, I think I should bable to give abit of advice (like you did!) without it been made to sound like its aload of crap..I was simply saying if your using something for the first time, make sure you know how


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