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New_image 01-05-2012 09:25 PM

Opinions on where to start trimming these feet!!
 
I am not sure what kind of advice I can get without anyone actually seeing his feet in person but I thought it couldn't hurt to throw it out there and maybe discuss some opinions.

Bear with the crappy pictures I was dealing with a wiggly yearling.

Last week his feet looked like this,
http://i488.photobucket.com/albums/r...omino/Colt.jpg

He had never really been out of a stall (two years old in June). We picked him up about a week ago and I trimmed his hooves just before he came out. He is now turned out in a small 30' pen off from a run in. His poor legs wouldn't handle much more activity and I know that this whole feet thing is going to take -a while- to correct. The problem is that I haven't found a farrier "willing to deal with him" yet so I have been doing his trimming. Thats the short story.

Right front foot,
http://i488.photobucket.com/albums/r...o/DSCF4120.jpg
http://i488.photobucket.com/albums/r...o/DSCF4139.jpg
http://i488.photobucket.com/albums/r...o/DSCF4126.jpg
http://i488.photobucket.com/albums/r...o/DSCF4123.jpg

Left front foot,
http://i488.photobucket.com/albums/r...o/DSCF4135.jpg
http://i488.photobucket.com/albums/r...o/DSCF4133.jpg

Hind feet,
http://i488.photobucket.com/albums/r...o/DSCF4118.jpg
http://i488.photobucket.com/albums/r...o/DSCF4128.jpg
http://i488.photobucket.com/albums/r...o/DSCF4130.jpg


The right front foot obviously needs some help. I took off some toe but haven't done much else, where would you start? A lot of the sole is higher than the hoof walls are, but because of this its as hard as a rock! Any special advice to chiseling that down?!

With his hind feet... it is obvious to me that his heels need to come down/back a bit. Right now his sole is longer (or higher) than his hoof wall and some of his frog is longer (higher) than the sole. In this case am I correct to assume that the sole needs to be slowly scraped down back where it belongs? Its as hard as a rock from him walking on it and I did not have any luck scraping at it with a hoof knife.
Hind feet question #2.... In the pictures of the hind foot that I had held up it is clear that the left side of his wall needs to come down considerably. His (heel bulb?) is actually higher than the right. Lowering that will eventually draw the heel bulb back down, correct?


Edited to ad -
Full body shots if they help. Here is how he stood in the very first picture,
http://i488.photobucket.com/albums/r...mino/Colt2.jpg

And here he is after the little nipping I've done,
http://i488.photobucket.com/albums/r...o/DSCF4149.jpg

tfs 01-05-2012 11:10 PM

As a farrier I would recomend finding a reputable farrier to take care of your horse. I like to use domosaden gel on ill behaved horses. It makes a better experience for your horse and you plus keep everyone safe. Most vets will sell this to you for this purpose. Good place to get farrier names is your vet office. Looks like his feet will shape right up with they proper tools and knowlegde. Keep him on a schedule and pick his feet out regularly. Good luck.

loosie 01-05-2012 11:30 PM

Hi there,

Great you realise you won't get accurate advice here, based only on a few pics. So I'm guessing you also appreciate the importance of doing your own homework & learning the principles behind the practices. Check out the links in my signature for more info.

Poor boy, he's lucky to have found someone to care for him & I hope he comes good for you. I would personally strive, ASAP to find a top farrier/trimmer in the area who is experienced in correcting hoof deformation & considering that right fore, I'd want to get xrays & a good equine vet's advice too. But in the meantime...

I think of primary importance at this point is to reduce those huge heels. I would do it gradually, tho it's hard to say from these pics, it seems that a fair bit could come off the fronts immediately. That underrun right one may need to be bevelled, to bring the heels back & releive the crushing without reducing height/angle much. The toes, while they don't look long, need to be kept under control, along with the quarters, in order to allow the heels to relax back.

It looks to me - & considering he's lived in a small pen - that his soles are likely not flat as they seem, but there is an aweful lot of dead material that hasn't exfoliated. The frog apexes all look like they have a bit of depth(tho perhaps little at front toes, esp right. What with getting those heels down & more movement, that excess sole should start to fall away & you shouldn't have to do any real carving, except for the bars.

So I'd say exercise is also extremely important. But I notice you said 'his poor legs wouldn't handle it'. Why do you say that? Is he lame? Does he struggle? I would keep him in a large area/paddock, but perhaps to start with, without company that may push him around, so that he will move more if he feels like it but not be forced. If he is struggling, I'd suggest a good vet sooner rather than waiting.

New_image 01-06-2012 09:00 AM

Very helpful loosie, Thanks for your thoughts.

The one new farrier that I found put me on a waiting list. One of my regular farriers came out and she did not even pick up his back because "they are fine"..... :? Another guy "prefers not to trim colts and stallions" so I am contacting my favorite local farrier now to get some opinions, but she does not really do correctional trims. I am kind of surprised by the chicken sh*t farriers. There are many, many other local farriers but its well known that I do not like any of them! My next bet is to haul the colt to the vet and farrier two hours away.

But I notice you said 'his poor legs wouldn't handle it'. Why do you say that?

No, he is not lame. This past week that he has been here is his first time out of a stall. His eye site is still "off" (if you lead him you have to watch out for things even as large as trees, the depth must be off or it may just be forgin to him that hes about to smack into something) he bruises like a grape when he bumps into something, he almost always skins himself. He occasionally runs into the panels in his pen when goofing around so a bigger area would offer him a space to actually run and I am planning to give him a few more weeks confined to a trot. A trot, at this point, is very new and exciting to him. He would surely hurt himself running and at the very least his jello legs need time to strengthen and it would be nice if his slipper foot was a bit more correct before someone asked it to carry his galloping body.

MHFoundation Quarters 01-06-2012 09:06 AM

Definitely not a farrier so no advice there. That stinks you can't find a corrective farrier closer to you. If you were a bit closer, I'd send mine to you - some of the things he's fixed (not mine) are pretty amazing. I can ask him though if he knows of someone if you'd like.

loosie 01-06-2012 05:56 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by New_image (Post 1296328)
occasionally runs into the panels in his pen when goofing around so a bigger area would offer him a space to actually run and I am planning to give him a few more weeks confined to a trot. A trot, at this point, is very new and exciting to him.

Oh, fair enough then! Gee, hope he comes good & hasn't got eyesight probs too. Yeah, if he's willing & able to trot for the first time, that's hopefully good enough to loosen some of the crud on his soles, so you can better see where you're going with hoofcare.

bntnail 01-07-2012 12:24 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by New_image (Post 1296328)
The one new farrier that I found put me on a waiting list.

Is good and buisy or knows about you.:wink:

Quote:

One of my regular farriers came out and she did not even pick up his back because "they are fine"..... :?
Horse not that good to work with.

Quote:

Another guy "prefers not to trim colts and stallions"
Older, wiser, and had the crap wallered and jerked out of him enough. May also know about you as well.

Quote:

so I am contacting my favorite local farrier now to get some opinions, but she does not really do correctional trims.
Not all that qualified.

Quote:

I am kind of surprised by the chicken sh*t farriers.
Self preservation?:shock: Or they know about you.

Quote:

There are many, many other local farriers but its well known that I do not like any of them!
They may not like you either.:wink: Doubt they are all that broken up about it.

Quote:

My next bet is to haul the colt to the vet and farrier two hours away.
Sounds like a viable option.

This is called "reading between the lines":wink:

There's a foot in there and any farrier/trimmer worth their salt can find it. Good luck to both you and your horse.

New_image 01-07-2012 04:26 PM

"Above poster to much time on hands" that is also called reading between the lines.

loosie 01-07-2012 05:53 PM

Ha ha to your reply to BNT! Tho I do agree basically with BNT's sentiments there. Not assuming it's necessarily you/that horse local farriers may have a prob with, but I don't think BNT is either - just posing the question. Is it possible the horse isn't the easiest & a little more training may be necessary?

I won't do difficult horses - it's just not worth it. However, I am happy to put in some time with a fractious horse as a trainer first, if the owner's open to it, or if they don't want to pay me to train, I'll give them some time to do it themselves & another chance or 2 before telling them to go elsewhere.

New_image 01-07-2012 06:35 PM

Loosie, he stood fine :) I guess my initial post made him sound very bad. By "willing to deal" I meant by taking the time to trim his hooves slowly and properly. I took some heel down today and I guess will just keep plugging along.
I am very proud of what the little fella has learned in a week here! He has to nibble on his lead rope to keep busy and he only has the patience to do about two and a half hooves at a time. I switch to another horse and come back to trim his other half or just lead him around for a minute then continue. He doesn't kick, wiggle, carry on, yank his feet back, run people over or anything. I guess his head wiggles while he chews on his ball or lead rope. And his patience is about up, like I said, after two feet but if a farrier cannot work with that then they should find a new career.

My Quarter Horses stand without halters and leads, my stallions are reasonable gentlemen, my draft mares stand without stocks and I only have one mare who can be a real pistol as well as the occasional rescue which the farriers are "informed" of. The problem is not my horses the problem is horrible farriers in the area, which you could ask anyone around. This is why I've started trimming the horses myself, I'm just not 100% sure where to start with this guy. Or how slow is slow. So if I can find a qualified person I'll be a happy girl! In the mean time the responses from a complete stranger... assuming the farriers in the area 'know of me' and do not like me.... were extremely un-helpful and rather annoying.


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