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-   -   Friendship Training does work (http://www.horseforum.com/natural-horsemanship/friendship-training-does-work-110797/)

FrancesB 01-26-2012 06:39 AM

Friendship Training does work
 
Hi everyone,

I noticed a couple of threads late last year discussing Friendship Training. I understand your scepticism, I thought it was too good to be true when I first read the website. After talking to some of the members in their Yahoo group I decided it sounded like it might work - it is soundly based in behavioural science. I was a bit desperate to find something that would work with my stubborn, unconfident, resistant gelding so decided it was worth the risk.

We are still only in the early stages of the program but already it has made an enormous difference to us. He is willing to do as I ask and to try, and a few weeks back when he was galloping with another horse he actually broke off to come stand by me. I realise that it might not be everyone's cup of tea, but I would heartily recommend it to anyone.

Regards
Frances

gigem88 01-26-2012 07:29 AM

If you get the results you want, then that is all that matters!

gypsygirl 01-26-2012 07:32 AM

what do you do with your horse for friendship training ?

Saranda 01-26-2012 07:37 AM

There seems to have been a topic on this already, where many shared their views -
http://www.horseforum.com/horse-trai...raining-89166/

gypsygirl 01-26-2012 07:41 AM

i was just curious as to what the OP did that helped her and her horse so much.

Saranda 01-26-2012 07:44 AM

Yeah, I'd like to read that too. Just seems to be something quite controversial, so I'm a bit sceptical, but as long as it has worked for the OP, it's fine with me.

DuffyDuck 01-26-2012 07:50 AM

As much as I love my horse, I REALLY don't want to go through mutual grooming.

I'll do more research when I get home, but this sounds to me like another one of these 'humanising' horses... do horse's understand a friend concept, or what 'friends' are?

FrancesB 01-26-2012 03:48 PM

The previous discussion seemed to be by people who had read the website but not actually done the program. :) I agree it looks a bit 'out there' but it really does work. It is not so much humanising horses as recognising we are both living creatures & have some things in common.

Horses can develop friendships/pair bonds/become horse buddies if they are kept in a herd environment; and in fact one of mine has a 'relationship' like this with one of the riding school horses - they hang out together all the time, graze together, groom each other.

:) No need for mutual grooming with your horse, I think most people who do the program probably gently discourage that. :) I would...

There is much more info on the website, but basically the aim of the program is to take away all the stress we may be accidentally putting on a horse by making their living conditions as natural as possible (24 hour turnout, able to interact naturally with other horses, feeding hay based diet, etc) and using positive reinforcement (ie rewarding for doing the right thing) rather than pressure and release to teach the horse. You also teach the horse some basic voice and hand cues - back, stand, move over, come, etc which you initially use for groundwork and later transfer to mounted cues. The horse is taught in a large open area - not a round pen or small yard - so you don't accidentally activate their fight or fight response.

It's not for everyone. To do it you have to be able to have your horse live in fairly natural conditions ie 24 hour turnout with other horses, which is problematic for many people. It also usually requires you don't ride the horse until you have finished the training - the idea here is you are both much safer if you develop good communication on the ground and then transfer it to ridden activity. I understand this may make it look unattractive, but at my age (I'm 51) a fall hurts and I'm happy to invest some time to get a safe riding partner.

My gelding was prone to being unpredictably spooky and very stubborn and resistant and was beginning to become dominant with me on the ground. My riding instructor was training him for me, he would go along fine for weeks and then 'blow up' and the blow-ups were increasing in strength - no bucking or rearing but becoming very spooky and continuously shying, jerking his head hard enough to break the instructors finger, etc. The change in him since I have been doing FT is remarkable - he willingly comes to me and tries to do as I ask, even backing up on request which he wouldn't do before, his whole posture has softened so that he looks happy and relaxed, the dominating behaviour towards me has disappeared. My biggest surprise was that I have become much more confident with him and all of the other horses; I didn't realise how much fear I was carrying with me until it left.

From talking with people on the Yahoo group FT is fantastic for horses with problems, and if you have one who you get on well with it deepens the relationship. All I can say is I'm delighted with how my horse is progressing, I wish I'd known about it ages ago.

Regards
Frances

Scoutrider 01-26-2012 05:33 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by FrancesB (Post 1327648)
There is much more info on the website, but basically the aim of the program is to take away all the stress we may be accidentally putting on a horse by making their living conditions as natural as possible (24 hour turnout, able to interact naturally with other horses, feeding hay based diet, etc)

The above is just basic good horsekeeping - any horseman will tell you that it is healthiest for the horse, physically and mentally, to be kept as naturally as possible; "as possible" being the key phrase. I'd hazard a guess that for 90% of horse owners (in the US, anyway) a completely natural state is out of the question for one reason or another. If mine were out 24/7/365 they would die of exposure before the weather broke in the spring. One horse in the barn physically cannot be barefoot - even not being ridden he will destroy a set of shoes in 8 weeks, and wear his bare hooves too short to nail to or risk trimming in under a month. A human riding and interacting with the horse period is highly unnatural.

Quote:

Originally Posted by FrancesB (Post 1327648)
using positive reinforcement (ie rewarding for doing the right thing) rather than pressure and release to teach the horse. You also teach the horse some basic voice and hand cues - back, stand, move over, come, etc which you initially use for groundwork and later transfer to mounted cues.

Again, this is basic good horsemanship. I would be very interested to hear how Friendship Training Positive Reinforcement compares/contrasts specifically with pressure and release. Pressure and release rewards the horse (via release of pressure - not necessarily even a physical touch; my fella responds to a glance and a shift of posture 9 times out of 10) for doing the right thing. I'd be very curious to hear a point-by-point comparison on that point. :wink:

Glad that you've found a training method that works for you and your horse!! :D

Northern 01-26-2012 06:06 PM

Thanks, Frances, for sharing a program that's done wonders for the relationship between you & your horse!

I can see that it's not far, if at all different, from Parelli: in PNH, the Friendly Game is the most important game, the relationship is priority, & "getting it good" on the ground is the prerequisite for each student, regardless of age! :)


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