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-   -   Would a sidepull be a could choice? (http://www.horseforum.com/horse-training/would-sidepull-could-choice-111337/)

3Barrels 01-31-2012 03:03 PM

Would a sidepull be a could choice?
 
I own a almost three year old, which I've ridden about the grand total of 5 times. I have a O-ring snaffle for him, which I have ridden him in 4 of the 5 times, and he never has nescessarily repsonded well to it. He chomps on the bit and seems to like it, but I don't believe he understands what I'm asking of him when using the bit.
So today I proposed to my sister, who was helping me with him, that we try a hackamore on him, which we did. He responded EXTREMELY better in it compared to his snaffle. I did some reading up on hackamores once we finished riding (I've only known one person who ever used a hackamore regularly, and really have never used one myself intill now) It sounds like a sidepull would be a good thing to invest in for him? If so, what kind would you suggest, and would I be able to do any local showing or playdays with him in it? Also, would it be a good thing (if I continue with the entire hackamore thing) to eventually move him back up into his snaffle?


Thanks!

Corporal 01-31-2012 03:22 PM

By O-ring snaffle, do you mean an eggbutt snaffle? That is a good and a standard starting bit for a young horse. In recent years many people put a leather curb strap on a snaffle like this so that the bit won't slip through their mouths when you train. I wouldn't suggest a hackamore. You are the victim of people who think you're hurting a horse's mouth with any kind of bit, so the horse will respond and like you better if you don't use one. A mechanical hackamore will rub the hide of a horse's face if he's green and throws his head around.
You need either a trainer or you need to buy some NH methods so you know what you're doing. The best way to train is hours and hours of ground training for obedience. Since he's been backed, you could back him for about 5 minutes at the end of each session, but I'd go back and teach him to give to the bit ON THE GROUND, until he's soft and responsive.
Training horses isn't rocket science, and I'm sure you could get the job done, but I wouldn't use a mechanical hackamore on a horse that wasn't finished, IMHO.

mystykat 01-31-2012 03:25 PM

By O-ring snaffle I'm pretty sure she 3 barrels means o-ring snaffle.

I would do as Corporal suggested and have the horse give to the bit on the ground before riding.

Corporal 01-31-2012 03:39 PM

I know that I sometimes don't keep up with new bits, like the Mylar company, which seems to be reinventing them, but does "0-ring" mean, "Loose Ring Snaffle?" ...confused...

SorrelHorse 01-31-2012 03:42 PM

A sidepull is the equivelent of a snaffle bit in bitless riding. My colt likes one, but I recently switched him to a twisted Myler snaffle (I do NOT suggest doing this with your colt. Mine has had a lot of training on him and is past his baby years.) so I don't use it on him anymore.

What are you looking to do with this colt? Might it be barrel racing (Guessing on your name here) I would suggest possible letting him go in a sidepull, then advancing your way up to a little S hackamore. Some horses just do better without a bit.

EDIT: Corporal, an O ring snaffle would be a loose ring snaffle.

This mouthpieces here aren't relevent, I just loveeeee color on bits o.o Plus I'm on school internet and everything else more relevent is blocked for some strange reason I can't comprehend.

http://www.justforponies.com/Product...ColorsRing.jpg

mystykat 01-31-2012 03:43 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Corporal (Post 1334759)
I know that I sometimes don't keep up with new bits, like the Mylar company, which seems to be reinventing them, but does "0-ring" mean, "Loose Ring Snaffle?" ...confused...


To me they are one in the same. Though I'm no expert. I use loose ring/o-ring and eggbutt snaffles exclusively so that's about all I could tell ya

SorrelHorse 01-31-2012 04:39 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mystykat (Post 1334769)
To me they are one in the same. Though I'm no expert. I use loose ring/o-ring and eggbutt snaffles exclusively so that's about all I could tell ya


What I think is amusing about that is that in your avatar the horse has a D ring snaffle on....;D (He's absolutely adorable btw)

mystykat 01-31-2012 04:54 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SorrelHorse (Post 1334833)
What I think is amusing about that is that in your avatar the horse has a D ring snaffle on....;D (He's absolutely adorable btw)


HAHA!! That is quite amusing. That was my second ride on him and his first day home last winter. I had to borrow a friends bridle (and I'm way too lazy to change out a bit for a short little bareback ride) because the one I had for my last horse was HUGE on him. So maybe I should say I own only eggbutt and loose ring.. He didn't mind that bit though(and the bit is too big :O).

EDIT: And yes, I agree he is quite adorable hehe.

3Barrels 01-31-2012 06:31 PM

Sorry for the confusion! Yes, by O-ring I ment loose ring, down here that's what everyone calls them, or just general "snaffle" means one aswell. Basically what Sorrelhorse posted, but without the fancy colors. :) (Though I do admit I like them too!)


Quote:

Originally Posted by Corporal (Post 1334736)
By O-ring snaffle, do you mean an eggbutt snaffle? That is a good and a standard starting bit for a young horse. In recent years many people put a leather curb strap on a snaffle like this so that the bit won't slip through their mouths when you train. I wouldn't suggest a hackamore. You are the victim of people who think you're hurting a horse's mouth with any kind of bit, so the horse will respond and like you better if you don't use one. A mechanical hackamore will rub the hide of a horse's face if he's green and throws his head around.
You need either a trainer or you need to buy some NH methods so you know what you're doing. The best way to train is hours and hours of ground training for obedience. Since he's been backed, you could back him for about 5 minutes at the end of each session, but I'd go back and teach him to give to the bit ON THE GROUND, until he's soft and responsive.
Training horses isn't rocket science, and I'm sure you could get the job done, but I wouldn't use a mechanical hackamore on a horse that wasn't finished, IMHO.

I think you've misunderstood me on a few things. I did not try him in a hackamore because I believe bits are harsh, I just knew he was responsive to nose pressure on the ground, so I suggested to my sister (my equivalent to a trainer, she trains horses for a living) that we try one just to see how responsive he would be, which he responded tons better to.
I'll probably try backing after each session, like you suggested, and working with him in the snaffle on the ground aswell. I still may try the sidepull (Not a mechanical hackamore) for him to get used to my leg pressure in the saddle, as I imagine that would make it easier if I try to ride him in the snaffle someday.


Quote:

Originally Posted by SorrelHorse (Post 1334765)
A sidepull is the equivelent of a snaffle bit in bitless riding. My colt likes one, but I recently switched him to a twisted Myler snaffle (I do NOT suggest doing this with your colt. Mine has had a lot of training on him and is past his baby years.) so I don't use it on him anymore.

What are you looking to do with this colt? Might it be barrel racing (Guessing on your name here) I would suggest possible letting him go in a sidepull, then advancing your way up to a little S hackamore. Some horses just do better without a bit.

All around horse is what I'm thinking for him, if he takes to barrels, he may someday replace my gelding. I do think I'll try a sidepull on him, though. Do you think this would work? Mustang Nylon Side Pull - Horse.com

christopher 01-31-2012 06:57 PM

pros of snaffle: if he's going to be ridden in a bit long term, he might as well learn early.
cons of snaffle: being an inexperienced horse he's more apt to play up than others, combined with the fact that he doesn't understand how to respond to the snaffle means that it could possibly take a lot of pressure to control him if he's doing something dangerously wrong. which could damage his mouth.

pros of sidepull: he probably already knows what nose pressure means from his handling on the ground. so you'll have more effective "buttons" on him and if anything were to go wrong he'll be more likely to understand those and come back under control.
cons of sidepull: if he's going to be ridden in a bit long term, every hour you ride in a sidepull is an hour he couldve been learning to be soft & give to the bit.


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