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-   -   Neck Reining:What's The Best Way To Teach It? (http://www.horseforum.com/horse-training/neck-reining-whats-best-way-teach-114329/)

countryryder 02-25-2012 06:26 PM

Neck Reining:What's The Best Way To Teach It?
 
Wondering what is the best/most effective method to train a horse,that is used to direct reining, how to neck rein..The horse will respond to a combination of neck/direct reining,but not to neck reining on it's own. Any suggestions?

loosie 02-25-2012 06:47 PM

I'd keep up the combo & gradually use less direct pressure as the horse gets it. If he doesn't, back it up with more direct. I'd also teach the horse to respond to seat & leg aids, which can e done in a similar manner.

waresbear 02-25-2012 06:57 PM

If you already got the basics down, seat, legs & weight (which means when this horse is in a mellow fellow mood & will do it without bit pressure, otherwise you have no business neckreining nuttin') move the reins way up on the neck, the instant the horse doesn't not respond, give offside rein cue. You might want to have someone on the ground help you with this.

GotaDunQH 02-26-2012 11:00 AM

Teach your horse to move away from your leg, regardless of whether you are direct and indirect reining. Once your horse moves away from your leg, it's a matter of raising your hand UP so the horse feels the reins move and at the same time....asking your horse to move away from your leg.

MHFoundation Quarters 02-26-2012 11:19 AM

I do a combo, direct/indirect/leg. It works in one smooth motion. It's a bit hard to describe in text but I'll give it a go. Hands on the same plane, in a slight up and over motion (so the direct shows them where to go in conjunction with the neck rein) and use outside leg asking them to move off the leg. It's important that it's all done in one motion, so they connect the dots. At first you may need to use a pinkie more pressure on the direct just to get his nose headed the right direction. Start by asking for one step at a time, lifting the shoulder and moving him over. Wash, rinse, repeat. Once he's started to catch on, you can ask him for more and slowly bring your hands closer together, eventually ending up with a one handed neck reining horse.

Using this method, I can usually put a neck rein on a greenie in a few rides.

Ladytrails 02-26-2012 12:12 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MHFoundation Quarters (Post 1379236)
I do a combo, direct/indirect/leg. It works in one smooth motion. It's a bit hard to describe in text but I'll give it a go. Hands on the same plane, in a slight up and over motion (so the direct shows them where to go in conjunction with the neck rein) and use outside leg asking them to move off the leg. It's important that it's all done in one motion, so they connect the dots. At first you may need to use a pinkie more pressure on the direct just to get his nose headed the right direction. Start by asking for one step at a time, lifting the shoulder and moving him over. Wash, rinse, repeat. Once he's started to catch on, you can ask him for more and slowly bring your hands closer together, eventually ending up with a one handed neck reining horse.

Using this method, I can usually put a neck rein on a greenie in a few rides.

MHF, thanks - I need this info, too. A question - are you doing this in the snaffle or a shanked bit?

Darrin 02-26-2012 12:19 PM

What I like to do is find a narrow trail, I then "neck rein" them around every twitch in the trail. Your horse will quickly figure out neck reining because they have the visual reinforcement of the trail with what you are asking of them.

chadthom 02-26-2012 12:38 PM

neckreining
 
Give him a reason to turn. Set up some obstacles so it's obvious that you want him to turn. Just before he goes to turn, give him the cue. He'll figure it out.

MHFoundation Quarters 02-26-2012 12:48 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ladytrails (Post 1379285)
MHF, thanks - I need this info, too. A question - are you doing this in the snaffle or a shanked bit?

No problem. In a snaffle. I don't put any in a shank until they've mastered neck reining.

Tasia 02-26-2012 01:34 PM

I can't say I have a particular way on how to train for it but there are two mistakes I see with greener riders.1. When they neck rein they drag their hand so far over the horses neck that the outside rein is being pulled, which just cause the horse to suck back. I think that's also why I see so many riders with horses that root their noses out whenever they are asked to turn.
2. In the training process a lot of riders never pay attention the horses nose, nose FIRST, not shoulders, not rib cage. I see it all the time, the horse is just throwing his shoulder into every turn.


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