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SammyAnn 03-05-2012 11:04 AM

Aaaaaaah! No brakes! No brakes!
 
Well here's the problem, my 10yo mustang mare has a stopping problem. When she's on the lead or lounge she is the perfect horse stopping and going right on que. but as soon as I get in the saddle it's Aaaaaah! No brakes! No brakes! I've tried:
gentle calm voice with a slight tug on the reigns
loud voice and countinually pulling on the reigns till she stops
having her stand still then walk forward stop and repeat

Once I do finally get her stopped she won't stand still! She almost ran through a fence with me still on her. please I don't want anyone to get hurt, so any advice?

Evansk 03-05-2012 11:11 AM

Have you ever used or heard of the One Rein Stop? Training ~ One-Rein Stop

If not, I would suggest finding a trainer to help with this sitaution, sounds like it's getting dangerous.

tierneylove09 03-05-2012 11:16 AM

My horse was the same way when I got him. our arena has metal fencing (not the most fun to run into) so when ever my horse wouldnt want to stop I would keep him going straight intil he had to stop with his nose against the fence. But if your horse would run right through the fence I wouldn't suggest that haha. Also, the one reign stop that was already suggested works!

Palomine 03-05-2012 11:22 AM

Reins not reigns. And cues not ques.

Anyway.

Have you checked saddle fit and placement? And have her teeth been done? It could be when your weight is in saddle that it is hurting her.

Could also be that your saddle has something wrong with it, loose nail inside it that is poking out? Or even broken tree.

You also may not be still with your hands and seat, aggravating her. Or bit might be irritating her too.

There could also be skeletal problems that show up mainly when under saddle.

Too many variables here.

And when she is doing this where are you at? Paddock or pen, or out in pasture? Just because a horse will stop well at liberty, does not mean it will under saddle.

You need, once saddle/vet issues are checked out, to work with her in smaller area if you are in pasture, making sure the basics of being ridden are solid.

SammyAnn 03-05-2012 11:38 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Palomine (Post 1392777)
Reins not reigns. And cues not ques.

Anyway.

Have you checked saddle fit and placement? And have her teeth been done? It could be when your weight is in saddle that it is hurting her.

Could also be that your saddle has something wrong with it, loose nail inside it that is poking out? Or even broken tree.

You also may not be still with your hands and seat, aggravating her. Or bit might be irritating her too.

There could also be skeletal problems that show up mainly when under saddle.

Too many variables here.

And when she is doing this where are you at? Paddock or pen, or out in pasture? Just because a horse will stop well at liberty, does not mean it will under saddle.

You need, once saddle/vet issues are checked out, to work with her in smaller area if you are in pasture, making sure the basics of being ridden are solid.

The saddle and bridle are what she was trained with, we've had her checked by a vet and she was said to be sound. it could just be my seat but I've had my mom watch me ride and she says that I'm fine posture wise. I'm riding he in a round pen right now just trying to get the basics. She is a new horse though I've only had her for about three months. Could that have something to do with it?

SammyAnn 03-05-2012 11:39 AM

her not he

usandpets 03-05-2012 11:39 AM

First off, do you flex her? Do you lunge her with the bit? Have you tried to drive her on the ground?

I agree with teaching her a one rein stop. When you do stop, have her back up a few steps.

When she won't stand still, flex her on both sides until you are ready to go again.
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Corporal 03-05-2012 11:44 AM

Evansk, LOVE the link!
Yes...60x...and if the horse fails, start over.
Yes, Virginia, it takes a LOT of time to train and perhaps 5x as much time to RE-train a bad habit out of them.

kitten_Val 03-05-2012 11:48 AM

Sammy, have you tried the trainer? :wink: Lessons often do miracles.

Joe4d 03-05-2012 12:14 PM

initially i thought, more bit, like a correction bit. But sounds like there are some training issues with you and your horse.
Ive very sensitive horses with inexperienced riders with legs flapping around basically telling the horse to go faster, but pulling reins telling them to go slower, some horses get pissy at the mixed signals.


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