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Just Ruthiey 03-09-2012 04:11 PM

Questions of selling
 
I have been thinking about getting rid of my 12/13 yr old gelding D.
But before I put him up on the market I really need some questions answered...

I got D probably last September, he was skinny and very nervous. Since then he has filled out to a nice looking boy, but he is still nervous. I do not know anything about his past, the lady we got him from wasn't the brightest. So I'm assuming that he was abused, probably mentally and physically. He is very head and body shy. But once he gets to know you and that you won't hit on him he gets a little better.
I wouldn't recommend riding him, he has some very nasty habit of rearing up in the air, he isn't very sure what you are asking when you attempt to turn, (he does how ever have breaks! :lol:). For a while I was riding him, he wasn't doing too bad either, but one day he just snapped and learned that if he rears up I won't put myself in that situation and I bail. (If he wasn't so shaky on his feet I think I'd keep him, and re-start his training again... but shaky + rearing isn't a combo I'm willing to play with.)
He'll life up his front and back feet, but kind of likes to lean on you with the back ones.
He handles on the ground pretty well, you just have to make sure you have his attention.
He is probably 12 to 13, we aren't truly sure. He is a bay gelding, probably some where between 15 hh and 16hh. He looks to have some Thoroughbred in him, maybe some Quarter.

--I think I have everything about him... now onto the questions.

Is it alright to make sure that D will have friends/ 'playmates'?

Would it be to much to ask for the new owners to keep in touch so I know how he is doing?

Could I try to sell him just as a pasture ornament or to a really strong rider?

I don't want to see D go to a bad home, so would I have the right to check out where he is going?

*And the biggest problem for me is, could I get the new owners to sign an agreement or just agree in-general that if they no longer want D they cannot sell him, that would have to return him to me?

Please let me know... Thanks so much :)

Just Ruthiey 03-09-2012 04:20 PM

Just to clarify, when I say sell as an ornament or to be ridden by a strong rider I mean can I dictate that?

horseshoe 03-09-2012 05:03 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Just Ruthiey (Post 1399831)
I have been thinking about getting rid of my 12/13 yr old gelding D.
But before I put him up on the market I really need some questions answered...

I got D probably last September, he was skinny and very nervous. Since then he has filled out to a nice looking boy, but he is still nervous. I do not know anything about his past, the lady we got him from wasn't the brightest. So I'm assuming that he was abused, probably mentally and physically. He is very head and body shy. But once he gets to know you and that you won't hit on him he gets a little better.
I wouldn't recommend riding him, he has some very nasty habit of rearing up in the air, he isn't very sure what you are asking when you attempt to turn, (he does how ever have breaks! :lol:). For a while I was riding him, he wasn't doing too bad either, but one day he just snapped and learned that if he rears up I won't put myself in that situation and I bail. (If he wasn't so shaky on his feet I think I'd keep him, and re-start his training again... but shaky + rearing isn't a combo I'm willing to play with.)
He'll life up his front and back feet, but kind of likes to lean on you with the back ones.
He handles on the ground pretty well, you just have to make sure you have his attention.
He is probably 12 to 13, we aren't truly sure. He is a bay gelding, probably some where between 15 hh and 16hh. He looks to have some Thoroughbred in him, maybe some Quarter.

--I think I have everything about him... now onto the questions.

Is it alright to make sure that D will have friends/ 'playmates'?

Would it be to much to ask for the new owners to keep in touch so I know how he is doing?

Could I try to sell him just as a pasture ornament or to a really strong rider?

I don't want to see D go to a bad home, so would I have the right to check out where he is going?

*And the biggest problem for me is, could I get the new owners to sign an agreement or just agree in-general that if they no longer want D they cannot sell him, that would have to return him to me?

Please let me know... Thanks so much :)

Hello, it's clear that you care about your horse :-) the best advice i could give you when selling him is just to be honest, this way you'll find a buyer who will care about him as much as you do and will be willing to work with him. The first thing i'd do is get together all the facts i possibly can eg. measure him so you know his exact height, get his teeth checked by a vet to determine his age (you may also find that his teeth are causing the rearing problem) and they may have an opinion on his breed so you know for sure. This will help potential buyers to come out and see him after speaking to you on the phone as these few facts are the fist questions they will be asking.
You definately have a right to chose his home... if he copes better with other horses around and you feel he may get lonely tell the new buyers that, you could let them know that you'd liketo keep in touch so you will know his progress..and if the people are nice they shouldn't have a problem with that, however be warned that this usually fades away as people change numbers or move location.
I wouldn't say to new owners that he should either be a pasture ornament or ridden by a strong rider, let the make that decision however you do need to be honest about the few issues you've had with hi and recomment that he be ridden by a experience, confident rider.
I understand completely about not wanting him to go to a bad home, so don't let him go unless you feel completely comfortable and you definately have a right to know and SEE where he is going, don't settle for photos...i have even went to potential buyers properties to check out the conditions. (if potential buyers abject to this then you know there is a problem).
For your last question unfortunately i don't think it s fair to ask that of a new owner, if you have gone through what i have said and you are happy with your horses new home and owners you can't really expect them to agree to something like that...you could say if that continue to have trouble with him like you have then you would buy him back which they would agree to since it would be very hard for them to sell him to anyone else but if they train him and can overcome his few issues then they may want to sell him to a competition home for example but by knowing their good character you can be sure they would only sell him to a good home.
Hope that helps...interested to read what other people think :-)

Speed Racer 03-09-2012 05:06 PM

Anyone who would agree to such ridiculous stipulations is an idiot.

If you SELL something, you have no rights to it any longer. If I buy it, it's mine to do with as I please, and you have no say in the matter.

If you want to keep tabs on the horse forever, then don't sell him. Period.

Taffy Clayton 03-09-2012 05:09 PM

The only way you are going to guarantee that your beloved horse is going to have a forever home is to keep him yourself. Look around on this forum and find all the great homes that went terribly wrong. Frankly if you can keep working with him that would be your best bet. Look on Craigslist, trained safe horses are a dime a dozen.

sillyhorses 03-09-2012 05:16 PM

Can you afford to send him to training?

Just Ruthiey 03-09-2012 06:44 PM

When I say sell I didn't really mean sell, sorry should have clarified. I meant give him away, I got him for free... -Well my brother got him for free :p I ended up with him.
There is just NO way I could sell him. Not with his behavioral issues.
Speed Racer they are not ridiculous. I want to see him go to a good home, I don't want to see him get sold to slaughter which was what was going to happen to him if my brother hadn't taken him, I don't want to see him go through anymore hardship than I'm sure he has been through.
With all of the issues that he has I don't want someone to loose their temper and lay him out.
-If I bought a horse and the previous owner wanted to keep tabs on them, and things like that I would be more than willing to help them out. You never stop wondering what is happening with that old horse you once had.
But everyone is entitled to their own opinion I guess.

If I searched my sofa cushions I might find some quarters layin' about for a trainer, but I do realize that trainers screw up :P -Now of course you have to be picky about who you send your horse to...

Thanks you everyone for your help and insight :)

yadlim 03-09-2012 06:54 PM

:cry:I don't want you to take this the wrong way... but with the way the horse market is, you are better to either keep him or put him down. His habits as you describe them are chronic and will not be easily worked through. There is a very high chance that a new owner will take him home and try for a while, figure that they are over thier head, and sell again - or turn to methods that make people like me cringe.

There are so many horses out there right now that are perfect in everyway that don't have homes, it is hard to find a place for a problem child where he will be actually cared for and not abused.

If you can't ride him and don't want to keep him as a pasture ornament, it might be honestly more humane for a quick and painless death in a place where he is not scared.

I have promised my horse, who is the best trained horse in the stable, but who can be very hard to handle and in the wrong hands would be a disaster, that should I even not be able to care for him, I will see to it that he has a calm and painless death by my hands. As a responsible horse owner, I will not allow my beloved horse to possibly fall into hands where he would not be cared for or even worse, abused.

(OK, now I have to go hug my horse :cry:)

As for you wanted requirments, you can try, but I doubt you will get them. I have sold a horse under stipulations very close to those, and she got a great home - but the only thing wrong with her is that she was not a kid's horse. She went on to become a very happy broodmare and trail horse.

DancingArabian 03-09-2012 07:05 PM

Unfortunately, the only way you can guarantee he doesn't go to a bad home or to slaughter is to keep him. You can stipulate whatever you want, but it's not binding. They have no obligation to adhere to anything you ask - including, and not limited to, you being able to visit and remain in the loop about the horse.

horsemom2be 03-10-2012 06:40 PM

If you still feel that you should sell him why not give a trial period to someone who seems to be a good fit? That way they will get a month or two to see if they are a good fit for eachother. And then you still own the horse so if you visit and the home is terrible then you can take him back home.


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