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-   -   Cantering on the wrong leg! How do I correct this? (http://www.horseforum.com/horse-training/cantering-wrong-leg-how-do-i-117866/)

biancalilly 03-27-2012 02:41 PM

Cantering on the wrong leg! How do I correct this?
 
My 7 yr old gelding almost always canters on the wrong leg. He doesnt do it on the lunge just when Im schooling him (so its something Im doing). He does it more on the right side than left. How can i get him on the right leg everytime???

kitten_Val 03-27-2012 03:14 PM

Then he's either unbalanced under the saddle or you use the wrong cues to ask for departure (my guess would be 1st though). How do you ask for canter?

biancalilly 03-27-2012 04:33 PM

At first I would push him on from my bum, then back it up with my leg.
But a friend told me to get him on the right leg I should first warn him that I will be asking for a canter by first sitting (while in trot) then pushing with my bum and following with a squeeze from the outside leg only? Ive tried this and it seems to fustrate him as he starts then to throw up his head.
He is lazy and I somtimes wonder if he does it to avoid work in the arena?

oh vair oh 03-27-2012 05:43 PM

Assuming everything is medically correct..

Once I can get leg-yields at the trot, I push the inside bend I want, then cue for the lope with my outside leg slightly behind where it is. This sets the horse up in the bowed position to take the correct lead.

If I get a stubborn/lazy horse, I usually have to work on forward movement before I can select the lead. If the horse does not transition from a trot to a lope well on his favored lead, we need to work on him going the second I cue him. I usually cue and then pop with the rein. If he throws a fit, I back him up to get him balanced again. Horses may put themselves off balance on purpose to try and get out of work, so I either do tight circles and then ask for the lope-off, or I'll back them up a ton and ask for the lope-off right then.

kevinshorses 03-27-2012 05:53 PM

Get out of the horses way and let it do what it knows it needs to do. A horse doesn't want to take the wrong lead and it doesn't feel right to a horse so if you set the horse up and get your spine aligned with the spine of the horse then it will take the proper lead.

biancalilly 03-28-2012 07:01 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by oh vair oh (Post 1426773)
Assuming everything is medically correct..

Once I can get leg-yields at the trot, I push the inside bend I want, then cue for the lope with my outside leg slightly behind where it is. This sets the horse up in the bowed position to take the correct lead.

If I get a stubborn/lazy horse, I usually have to work on forward movement before I can select the lead. If the horse does not transition from a trot to a lope well on his favored lead, we need to work on him going the second I cue him. I usually cue and then pop with the rein. If he throws a fit, I back him up to get him balanced again. Horses may put themselves off balance on purpose to try and get out of work, so I either do tight circles and then ask for the lope-off, or I'll back them up a ton and ask for the lope-off right then.

yeah he is fit an healthy had all the checks!
I thought maybe I was imagining it but yes I always suspected he was doing it to get out of work as when on the wrong leg I pull him up to start again. Also on lazy days he does it more!!! Ok so the above about leg yields n inside bend is all abit technical for me. Ive always ridden cross country, jumping an such im just entering the world of schooling/dressage!!! need it in dummy terms! Thanks

kitten_Val 03-28-2012 08:50 AM

I don't believe in horses starting with the wrong lead just to get off the work. First, because wrong lead on circle is not comfortable for the horse, second, because the transition lope -> trot -> lope takes more work on horse's side then just loping around. Also if horse is stiffer on particular side (and it's always or at least almost always a case) it may be more difficult to pick the correct lead.

Personally I'd establish a nice forward trot (NOT rushing) on 20 m circle with slight bent to inside, and when you feel you are balanced and ready yourself ask for the canter (inner leg at the girth, outer leg slightly behind the girth, slide your hips).

Saddlebag 03-28-2012 09:16 AM

Instead of stopping him and asking him to stop, try keeping him going and gradually reducing the size of your circles. I know, if's uncomfortable for you but do your best. As the circles get smaller it gets more uncomfortable for him and hopefully he will switch. When he does, I'd continue with half a dozen strides then take a break. I agree, he could have figured out that by cantering disunited he gets to stop and many horses see that as a reward. That's why I want you to push him on instead.

kevinshorses 03-28-2012 12:12 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by biancalilly (Post 1427639)
yeah he is fit an healthy had all the checks!
I thought maybe I was imagining it but yes I always suspected he was doing it to get out of work as when on the wrong leg I pull him up to start again. Also on lazy days he does it more!!! Ok so the above about leg yields n inside bend is all abit technical for me. Ive always ridden cross country, jumping an such im just entering the world of schooling/dressage!!! need it in dummy terms! Thanks

Those are the dummy terms! You need a lesson or two or fifty with a good dressage coach. I can't believe that you were eventing and never had to worry about changing leads, leg yields and inside/outside bend.

equiniphile 03-28-2012 12:21 PM

Leads are very important with jumping and cross country.


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