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HelenOliviaa 04-01-2012 09:29 AM

Yong horse with no respect
 
Hi everyone,

The yard i work at has a 4 year old TB that has had a bad start to life (old owner was young and thought he could train a horse with little experience). Everyone is rather nervous around him which consequencially he is very pushy.

I have started working on him. I took him out to lunge to day and it was evident he had done it a lot before as he started cantering round the circle at some speed. He then started making the circle smaller aiming at me. I didnt move from my place as i knew he was trying to intimidate me. He then started turning his bum to me and kicking out at me.

Asking others, they think that he does this as he knows if he scares and charges at the person in the middle enough they will put him away. He has been ridden and again starts fighting with his rider. I am yet to ride him as think he needs manners and respect before i even attempt to ride him.

I think he could be a lovely horse so dont want to give up hope like everyone else. Any advice?

franknbeans 04-01-2012 10:17 AM

Start him at square one with teaching respect on the ground. Pretend he knows nothing, and do not allow him to show you anything but respect. THere are good resources everywhere, including several threads on here.

MHFoundation Quarters 04-01-2012 10:24 AM

I agree with franknbeans. Start at square one and look at him as one who hasn't had any training and knows nothing. Most important thing for anyone handling him is not to give him any slack because of history, demand respect from him at all times.

Saddlebag 04-01-2012 10:37 AM

TB's were bred to run even if never raced. Instead of lungeing him which he's likely sick of doing, can you turn him out and let him get rid of his excess energy from being cooped up in a stall. Usually 15 min is ample. Then begin your groundwork. Keep your lunge whip in your left hand letting it tail behind your. I'd tie the lash to the handle so he doesn't step on it and yank it out of your hand. Use your lunge line rather than a lead shank. If he becomes too energetic you can always send him out in the circle to lunge 3 circles. You can use this as a form of punishment for bad behaviour. More than 3 circles can start creating resentment. Less than 3 and you don't get your point across. Horses often don't make the connection after the first time. By the second, he's sorting it out and by the third time he has figured it out. "Hmm, if I bounce around, I have to work"

Lauren Woodard 04-01-2012 02:25 PM

If you allow him to close the circle on you and not do anything, of course, he's going to decide "Hey, I bet I can just cut in, get a quick kick or whatever in and then see what happens."
Why shouldn't he? Just standing there doesn't gain respect even though it's better than running for the fence.
Tell him to keep himself out and not bulge in even an inch so he knows you're watching.
That's the quick answer 'cuz I don't want to type more :-)

franknbeans 04-01-2012 02:56 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Lauren Woodard (Post 1434309)
If you allow him to close the circle on you and not do anything, of course, he's going to decide "Hey, I bet I can just cut in, get a quick kick or whatever in and then see what happens."
Why shouldn't he? Just standing there doesn't gain respect even though it's better than running for the fence.
Tell him to keep himself out and not bulge in even an inch so he knows you're watching.
That's the quick answer 'cuz I don't want to type more :-)

Actually, staying there (standing your ground) is exactly what you need to do. However, you need to reinforce that he cannot make you move, nor can he come into your space.

Lauren Woodard 04-01-2012 02:58 PM

Yes, staying there is important, but you also MUST indicate that horse NOT invade. If you JUST stand there it won't help.

Palomine 04-01-2012 03:36 PM

Why are you not tearing the rear up? Standing there as Lauren said is teaching nothing. He comes in, POP with lash whip and send him out.

And wouldn't tie lash to whip handle either. Use that length to keep horse off of you, and moving.

But lunging TB's only builds up their stamina. Working on manners from ground does more for them, than running them around. Plus gets their blood pumping and makes it even harder to get their attention.

franknbeans 04-01-2012 04:23 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Lauren Woodard (Post 1434350)
Yes, staying there is important, but you also MUST indicate that horse NOT invade. If you JUST stand there it won't help.

My point is-he who moves his feet first loses. Use your whip, carrot stick, whatever- but he MUST respect your space and he may NOT make you move. If you have to, he must have a quick reality check as far as who is in charge!

Island Horselover 04-06-2012 12:36 AM

Turning his butt into you and kicking out is the most disrespectful thing a horse can do! I had an issue with a new horse we tried to trailer load and it did not like it at all and tried to run me over and even turned his butt in... MAKE HIM WORK! Show him that this is a NO GO! Everytime he does something disrespectful make him run in the round pen, first it gets rid of some energy (might take a while with a TB) and make sure that you act right away, do not give him time to think that he can get away with it. When he is more or less exhausted, try it again and watch him closley, every single disrespectful thing he does needs to be corrected and if he does well reward him, wait until he licks his lips (even if it takes a while until he does) this is as important as showing him who is in charge! He will soon give up and enjoy doing what you want as this will be the easier way to go :)) Just make sure that you are the one in charge! Good luck with this and do not get frustrated and btw, I liked your statement that you do not attemp to get in the saddle before the respect issue is solved - WAY TO GO!!!


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