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vergo97 04-08-2012 06:17 PM

lessons or loaning?
 
I have been having lessons for about 18 months, and I can walk, trot and canter. I have done very low jumps but I am not that good at it. I have one lesson a week.

I really want to get to know how to care for horses and not just how to ride though, as I would really like to have one when I'm older. I get to brush the horses and sometimes pick out their feet, but I learn nothing about food/health care/types of brushes.

Loaning a horse seems like the best thing to do, but I wouldn't be able to have my lessons as well as we wouldn't be able to afford it (we spend 80 a month on lessons at the moment).

Would leasing a horse be worth giving up lessons for? Can I still learn and improve my riding if I don't have lessons? And if I did loan a horse, would the owner be able to teach me things so that I know what I'm doing, or would I have to know everything already?

Skyseternalangel 04-08-2012 07:25 PM

I think you should go for it, who knows.. maybe you find a leasing situation where you get one free or discounted ride per week or per month. But it's so worth it.. you can always find a way to squeeze in a lesson now and then once you begin leasing and the best way to learn is miiiles in the saddle.

ThursdayNext 04-08-2012 07:42 PM

I learned all that stuff from the person I took lessons from. I told her that I wanted to take lessons with the idea of having my own horse at some point, and needed to know how to take care of them. She was happy to teach me (while it took a little time up-front, it meant less hassle for her). Have you asked about this at your lesson barn?

princecharming 04-08-2012 07:50 PM

im another HUGE leasing fan, but could you just ask your instructor to learn more about feed/care of more time with a lesson horse? at most barns i have been at, instructors LOVE if you are willing to help feed/brush/care for the lesson horses, its a great way to volenteer. I think leasing is a better way to learn more about riding, but for horse care i would like to work at a barn with many different horses so i could learn more about the different varieties(: good luck!!

Skyseternalangel 04-08-2012 09:39 PM

I agreed up until this part

Quote:

Originally Posted by princecharming (Post 1444107)
I think leasing is a better way to learn more about riding,

I have only leased two horses in my entire life. The first wasn't a verbal lease, I just rode and trained and cared for this Haflinger. In all my years of lessons, we're talking over 7 years at that time, I learned more with that free lease than I thought imaginable.

Lessons are mainly riding. You pay to learn how to ride a horse.

But you have a solid point, you can definitely ask to learn more about the care side of things.. but you won't learn nearly as much as you would with the right lease situation. Especially if the barn is busy and horses are in and out like gas in a tank.

Oh, and the second lease is my Sky, my first and only horse. He was a work-lease. Meaning, I worked.. and what I would have earned went into him. I worked over 12 hours a day for an entire summer for that horse, and one day he was mine. I learned so much about him during that lease though. About his health, his feet, about cleaning tack, how to take the horse's temperature, about deficiencies and when to call the vet, about stall rest and taking care of a wound, about handling and horse body language. Everything to scrubbing out and refilling the water buckets. Again, more than I ever hoped to learn in all my years of riding. And I'm still learning.

Even leasing for a short month, and then taking up lessons again would be beneficial. It's more than just riding. It really truly feels like you have a horse, without the entire truckload of responsibility.

Just if you do decide to lease, make sure there is a contract and make sure that you and if you live with parents, really look over it carefully.

DraftXDressage 04-08-2012 09:40 PM

I'm not sure how you'll learn anything leasing that you couldn't learn from lessons/asking questions/reading. In most part-least situations, the lessee and the lessor are using the horses on different days, so it's not as though you're going to spend tons and tons of time soaking up information from the lessor.

vergo97 04-09-2012 07:58 AM

When I go for my lesson, I am often rushed to get the horse ready, there isn't time for me to ask questions about grooming and I am told not to pick out the feet of one of the horses I sometimes ride because he can kick out. I have group lessons so there are about 3/4 of us getting ready, and the lesson before us are trying to get untacked so the people that work there are busy helping others.

I could ask at the stables if I could help out, but there are already lots of people that work there and I wouldn't want to be the person who gets in the way. I don't know anyone there, I don't even really know my instrustors well (there are three of them, and it's random which one I have for my lesson) and I feel a bit nervous asking.

princecharming 04-09-2012 08:48 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Skyseternalangel (Post 1444254)
I agreed up until this part



I have only leased two horses in my entire life. The first wasn't a verbal lease, I just rode and trained and cared for this Haflinger. In all my years of lessons, we're talking over 7 years at that time, I learned more with that free lease than I thought imaginable.

Lessons are mainly riding. You pay to learn how to ride a horse.

But you have a solid point, you can definitely ask to learn more about the care side of things.. but you won't learn nearly as much as you would with the right lease situation. Especially if the barn is busy and horses are in and out like gas in a tank.

Oh, and the second lease is my Sky, my first and only horse. He was a work-lease. Meaning, I worked.. and what I would have earned went into him. I worked over 12 hours a day for an entire summer for that horse, and one day he was mine. I learned so much about him during that lease though. About his health, his feet, about cleaning tack, how to take the horse's temperature, about deficiencies and when to call the vet, about stall rest and taking care of a wound, about handling and horse body language. Everything to scrubbing out and refilling the water buckets. Again, more than I ever hoped to learn in all my years of riding. And I'm still learning.

Even leasing for a short month, and then taking up lessons again would be beneficial. It's more than just riding. It really truly feels like you have a horse, without the entire truckload of responsibility.

Just if you do decide to lease, make sure there is a contract and make sure that you and if you live with parents, really look over it carefully.

darn, i read that post and completly agreed, then went back to the quote and realized it was from me:oops:

when you make those points i have to agree with you also, because im leasing my horse (full lease from a leasing company from a different state) and im learning a lot about horse care.

so, now that i have dissagreed with myself, good luck with your lease/lessons!

vergo97 04-09-2012 04:20 PM

yeah, that's the main reason I want to loan. I want to know about horse care, not just the riding :-)

Skyseternalangel 04-09-2012 08:38 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by vergo97 (Post 1445572)
yeah, that's the main reason I want to loan. I want to know about horse care, not just the riding :-)

I'm leasing out my horse right now as I am away in a different country and I communicate with my lessees via email and even before I left I made sure that they knew how to take care of him. I even taught my best friend who has been riding for over 10 years how to care for a horse. She never knew until I taught her.

Now it just takes the right situation. Some horse owners just want the money, some (like me) want the best for their horse and want to share their horse with others. And some just have no time to ride and want to keep their horse in shape.

No matter the reason, as long as you find someone that leases to you, who is willing to answer questions and help you go through things step by step, who lets you go to farrier appointments and vet shot days to see how the process works.

Plus you get allll day to groom if you wanted to, haha. That in of itself is awesome.

Like I said, you just need to find the right leasing situation.


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